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UNDERGRADUATE CATALOC 

2011-2013 



UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 

2011-2013 



"Birthplace of "Lift Every Voice and Sing" 



CATALOG 49 



Florida Memorial University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097) 
Telephone number 404-679-4500 to award bachelor's and Master's degrees. The University is 
also chartered by the State of Florida 



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Statement of Disclosure 

The information contained in this catalog represents the current requirements, regulations, 
programs, fees and other charges of Florida Memorial University. Regulations and requirements 
stated herein, including fees and other charges, are subject to change without notice at the 
discretion of the Board of Trustees and the President of the University. The University further 
reserves the right to require a student to withdraw at any time as well as the right to impose 
probation on any student whose conduct is unsatisfactory. Admission based on false statements 
or documents will be voided. Credit will not be granted for classes taken under these 
circumstances. In addition, tuition or fees paid will not be refunded if a student is dismissed or 
suspended from the University for cause. Any balances owed the University are considered 
receivable and will be collected. 

Florida Memorial University maintains a system of records which includes application forms, 
letters of recommendation, admission test scores, and student transcripts. Records are made 
available upon written request through the Office of the Registrar. Direct access and disclosure 
to a third party are prohibited by law. Access is given only upon written consent by the student 
or if required in legal matters. Disclosure of student records to parents is not prohibited if the 
student is listed as a dependent on the federal income tax form of the parent. A person does not 
have the right of access to educational records until he or she has been admitted and has 
actually begun attending Florida Memorial University. 

Parents of dependent students will be provided a hearing by Florida Memorial University if 
they wish to challenge the contents of the record. If still not satisfied, the parents of dependent 
students may add explanatory or rebuttal materials to the record. 

Florida Memorial University practices a policy of nondiscrimination in employment and 
admission. It is a policy of the University to provide equal opportunity to all persons without 
regard to race, religion, color, national origin, citizenship, age, sex, marital status, disabilities, 
labor organization membership, political affiliation, height, weight, and record of arrest without 
conviction. 



Table of Contents 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Statement of Disclosure iv 

Academic Calendar 4 

UNIVERSITY INFORMATION 

Institutional Statement of Purpose 10 

Accreditations 11 

Campus Facilities and Resources 14 

Campus Directory 16 

Requirements for Admission to the University 18 

Financial Information 22 

Freshmen and New/Transfer Student Orientation 29 

Anti-Hazing Policy 30 

Schedule of Tuition and Fees 32 

Payment of Tuition and Fees 35 

Exam Permit 36 

Refund Schedule 37 

ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

Academic Affairs 39 

Degree Programs 40 

Academic Standing 43 

Graduation Requirements 49 

Grading System and Quality Points 51 

Grade Reports 52 

Change of Grades 52 

Academic Honors 53 

Honor Societies 53 

Add, Drop and Withdrawal 55 

Academic Honor Code 57 

University Library and Services 63 

Freshman Studies 66 

Testing Center Services 69 

Core Curriculum 70 

Honors Program 72 

ACADEMIC SCHOOLS 

School of Arts & Sciences 74 

School of Business 163 

School of Education 178 

iv 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 215 

UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL 321 

INDEX 334 



Campus Map 



1. Main Entrance - A. B. Coleman Jr. 16. 
Drive, Welcome Center 

2. Lion Statue 17. 

3. Tennis Courts 

4. J.T. Brown Residence Hall 18. 

5. A.B. Coleman Sr. Residence Hall 19. 

6. New Residential Halls 20. 

• Health Center 21. 

7. R. Ray Goode Residence Hall 22. 

8. Willie C. Robinson Residence Hall 23. 

9. J.C. Sams Student Union 24. 

• Counseling Center 25. 

• Student Publication 26. 

10. William Lehman Aviation Center 27. 

11. Entrance Gate 2 28. 

12. James Weldon & J. Rosamond 29. 
Johnson Fine Arts Building 30. 

13. Music Annex 

14. Albert E. & Sadie B. Smith Dining 31. 
Hall/Conference Center 32. 

15. FIU/FMU Cooperative Use Building 33. 

34. 



Celestine Dixon & Sarah Rice Fountain 

of Excellence 
Lou Rawls Center for the Performing 
Arts 

M. Athalie Range Science Hall 
Athletic Annex 

A. Chester Robinson Athletic Center 
Entrance Gate 1 

Harry T. Moore Memorial Baseball Field 
Sarah A. Blocker Hall 
Nathan W. Collier Library 
Royal Puryear Administration Building 
Central Energy Plant 
Alumni Affairs 
Human Resources 
Church Relations 

Andrew Anderson & Donald Bacon 
Service Center 

Public & Governmental Affairs 
Pre-College Outreach 
Student Services Building 
Susie C. Holley Religious Center 




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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



2011-2013 Academic Calendar 

FALL SEMESTER, 2011 
AUGUST 

11* Faculty and Staff Conference/Workshops (All Offices will be closed unless otherwise 
indicated) 

1 1 * Faculty Meeting (TB A) 

12* Faculty and Staff Workshops 

12 Schools and Departmental Meetings (3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

13 Residence Halls Open - NEW STUDENTS ONLY 

13 New Student Campus Life Orientation Begins (Continues through 8/22) 

15 Testing - NEW STUDENTS ONLY (2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

16 Advising and Registration - NEW STUDENTS ONLY (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

16 ADJUNCT FACULTY ORIENTATION (6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.) 

1 7 Residence Halls Open - RETURNING STUDENTS 

1 7 Advising and Registration - NEW STUDENTS ONLY (9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.) 

18 Late Registration Begins -$50 fee (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

(Returning students who did not register early will be assessed a $50 fee.) 

18 Add/Drop Begins - $ 10 fee (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

19 MBA GRADUATE CLASSES BEGINS (SESSION A) 

19 Late Registration - ALL STUDENTS - Main Campus (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

20 Late Registration Ends - ALL STUDENTS - Main Campus (9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.) 
20* Purge (drop) students who have not cleared the Business Office (5:00 p.m.) 

22 MSED GRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN (SESSION A) 

22 UNDERGRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN 

27* Add/Drop Ends - $10 fee (9:00 a.m. - 1:00 pm) 

SEPTEMBER 

5 Labor Day (No Classes) 

6 Classes Resume 

7 Sophomore Year Experience Day 

8 Fall Convocation 

14 Senior Year Experience Day 
28 Junior Year Experience Day 

OCTOBER 

Major Orientation Month 

7 MBA GRADUATE CLASSES END (SESSION A) 

8 MSED GRADUATE CLASSES END (SESSION A) 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



OCTOBER (cont'd) 

3-8 Mid-Term Examinations (Exam Permit Required - See Student Accounts) 

10 MSED GRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN (SESSION B) 

11 Mid-Term Grades Due 

11 Hispanic Heritage Celebration 

13 Honors and Awards Day (Fall 2010 and Spring 2011 Honorees) 

13 MSED GRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN (SESSION B) 

14 MBA GRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN (SESSION B) 
15* Coronation 

15 Deadline for ordering caps and gowns for Fall 2011 Commencement 

NOVEMBER 

1 Early Registration for Spring 2012: November 2 through December 16 
(Returning students who did not register early will be assessed a $50 fee.) 

4 Last Day to Withdraw from a course (WP/WF) 

4 Deadline to Apply for Spring 2012 Commencement 

4 Deadline to Pay $200.00 Fee for Spring 2012 Commencement 

24-27 Thanksgiving Recess 

28 Classes Resume 

28 Deadline to Remove Incomplete Grades from Spring & Summer 2011 

28 Deadline for Credit by Examination 

28 Last day to withdraw officially from the university 

28 Last day to clear the Business Office for returning students who registered early for the 

Spring 2012 
28-December 3 Final Examinations for Graduating Seniors 

DECEMBER 

2 Classes End 

3 MSED GRADUATE CLASSES END (SESSION B) 

3 Senior Exams End 

3-9 Final Examinations (Exam Permit Required-See Students Accounts) 

4 Final Grades Due for Graduating Seniors by 12 MIDNIGHT 

7 Commencement Rehearsal at 6:00 p.m. 

8 Senior Banquet 

9 Baccalaureate Services 

9 MBA GRADUATE CLASSES END (SESSION B) 

10 Fall 2011 Commencement 

1 1 Residence Halls Close for Graduating Seniors at 5:00p.m. 

12 Final Grades Due (All other Students) by 12 MIDNIGHT 

Dec. 18, 2011- Jan.2, 2012: CAMPUS CLOSED FOR THE HOLIDAY BREAK 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



SPRING SEMESTER, 2012 
JANUARY 

2 Residence Halls Open - ALL STUDENTS 

2 New Student Orientation (2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.) 

3 Faculty /Staff Conference (8:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.) 
3 Faculty Meeting (2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.) 

3 Schools and Departmental Meetings (3:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

3 Testing - NEW STUDENTS ONLY (2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

4 Advising and Registration - NEW STUDENTS ONLY (9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.) 

5 Advising and Registration - ALL STUDENTS - MAIN CAMPUS (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 
5 Late Registration Begins- $50 fee (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

(Returning students who did not register early will be assessed a $50 fee at registration) 

5 Add/Drop Begins- $10 fee (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

6 Advising and Registration - ALL STUDENTS - MAIN CAMPUS (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.; 

7 Late Registration Ends - ALL STUDENTS - Main Campus (9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.) 
7 Add/Drop Ends- $10 fee (9:00 a.m. - 1:00 pm) 

7 Purge (drop) students who have not cleared the Business Office. (2:00 p.m.) 

9 UNDERGRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN 

9 MSED GRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN - (SESSION A) 

1 3 MBA GRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN - (SESSION A) 

16 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday (NO CLASSES) 

1 7 Classes Resume 

FEBRUARY 

BLACK HISTORY MONTH - (PROGRAMS WILL BE HELD THROUGHOUT THE MONTH) 

5 -12 Homecoming Week 

5 -12 Presidential Inauguration: Henry Lewis III, Pharm.D. 

14 Deadline to Apply for Summer 2012 Graduation 

14 Deadline to Pay $200.00 Fee for Summer 2012 Graduation 
27 MSED GRADUATE CLASSES END - (SESSION A) 

27 - March 3Mid-Term Examinations: (Exam Permit Required - See Student Accounts) 

MARCH 

2 MBA GRADUATE CLASSES END - (SESSION A) 

5-10 SPRING BREAK 

12 Classes Resume 

1 2 MSED GRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN - (SESSION B) 

1 2 Mid-Term Grades Due - 1 2:00 Noon 

15 Founders' Day 

16 Annual Employee Recognition Luncheon 

1 6 MBA GRADUATE CLASSED BEGINS - (SESSION B) 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Under graduate Catalog 



MARCH (cont'd) 

20 Deadline for ordering caps and gowns for Spring 2012 Commencement 

23 Last Day to Withdraw from a course (WP/WF) 

23 Faculty Senate Conference & Luncheon 

26 Early Registration for Summer & Fall 2012 Begins 

(Returning students who did not register early will be assessed a $50 fee) 

APRIL 

5 Research and Performing Arts Day 

6 Good Friday (NO CLASSES) 

13 Deadline for Credit-by-Examinations 

13 Deadline to Remove Incomplete Grades from Fall 2011 

13 Last day to withdraw officially from the university 

13 Deadline to Apply for Fall 2012 Commencement 

13 Deadline to Pay $200.00 Fee for Fall 2012 Commencement 
20 Last Day of UNDERGRADUATE CLASSES 

23 - 28 Final Examinations (Exam Permit Required - See Student Accounts) 

27 MSED GRADUATE CLASSES END - (SESSION B) 

28 MBA GRADUATE CLASSES END - (SESSION B) 

29 Final Grades Due for Graduating Seniors by 12 Midnight 

MAY 

2 Final Grades Due (All other Students) by 12 MIDNIGHT 

2 Commencement Rehearsal at 6:00 p.m. 

3 Senior Banquet 

4 Baccalaureate Services 

5 Spring 2012 Commencement 

6 Residence Halls Close at 5:00 p.m. 

SUMMER SESSION A, 2012 - May 16 th through June 19 th 
MAY 

10 Residence Halls Open 

10 Registration (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

(Returning students who did not register early will be assessed a $50 fee.) 

10 Add/Drop Begins - $10 fee (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

1 1 MBA GRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN - (SUMMER SESSION A) 
11 Late Registration Ends (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

11 Add/Drop Ends (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

14 MSED GRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN 

1 4 UNDERGRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN 

28 Memorial Day (HOLIDAY) 

29 Classes Resume 

29 Last day to Withdraw from a course (WP/WF) 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



JUNE 

8 Last day to withdraw officially from the university 

9 MBA GRADUATE CLASSES END - (SUMMER SESSION A) 

11-14 Final Examinations (Exam Permit Required - See Student Accounts) 

14 Last day of classes for Session A (UNDERGRADUATE) 

15 MBA GRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN - (SUMMER SESSION B) 

SUMMER SESSION B, 2012 - June 20 th through July 22 nd 
JUNE 

17 Residence Halls Open 

18 Registration (9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.) 

18 Add/Drop Begins - $10 fee (9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.) 

18 Final Grades Due by 6:00 p.m. - Session A 

1 8 UNDERGRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN 

19 Add/Drop Ends - $10 fee (9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.) 
19 Late Registration Ends (9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.) 

(Returning students who did not register early will be assessed a $50 fee.) 
29 MSED GRADUATE CLASSES END 

JULY 

4 Independence Day (NO CLASSES) 

5 Classes Resume 

5 Last day to withdraw from a course (WP/WF) 

5 Last day to withdraw officially from the university 

14 MBA GRADUATE CLASSES END - (SUMMER SESSION B) 

16 Residence Halls Close at 5:00 p.m. 

16-19 Final Examinations (Exam Permit Required - See Student Accounts) 
1 9 Last day of classes for Session B (UNDERGRADUATE) 
25 Final Grades Due by 6:00 p.m. - Session B 

SUMMER SESSION C, 2012 - May 16 th - July 16 th 
MAY 

10 Residence Halls Open 

10 Registration (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

(Returning students who did not register early will be assessed a $50 fee.) 

10 Add/Drop Begins - $10 fee (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

1 1 Late Registration Ends (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 
11 Add/Drop Ends (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

1 4 UNDERGRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN 
28 Memorial Day (HOLIDAY) 

June 

21 Last day to Withdraw from a course (WP/WF) 

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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



July 

5 Last day to withdraw officially from the university 

9-12 Final Examinations (Exam Permit Required - See Student Accounts) 

12 Last day of classes for Session C (UNDERGRADUATE) 
17 Final Grades Due for Session C by 6:00 p.m. 



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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Florida Memorial University's Mission 
statement of purpose 

Florida Memorial University serves a culturally diverse student population through programs 
in liberal and professional education. These programs are designed to prepare students to 
function in a highly competitive, technological and global society. Challenging educational 
opportunities are offered in a variety of instructional formats to traditional and non-traditional 
students. Internships and experiential learning programs are incorporated in an energetic 
learner-centered environment. Academic programs are supported by library services, 
information technology, academic advising, testing, developmental education, career 
development, counseling, intramurals, intercollegiate sports, student activities, and other 
support services. 

Florida Memorial University is dedicated to academic excellence, to the pursuit of knowledge 
and truth, to the free exchange of ideas, and to the transmission and preservation of African- 
American history and heritage. The University recognizes that education contributes to the 
quality of life and expects that students will leave its community of scholars and traditions 
prepared to participate fully in a global society. 

MISSION STATEMENT 

Florida Memorial University endeavors to instill in students the importance of becoming global 
citizens through life-long learning, leadership, character, and service which will enhance their 
lives and the lives of others. 



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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalo g 



Accreditation 

Florida Memorial University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033- 
4097)Telephone number (404-679- 4500) to award bachelor's and master's degrees. The 
University is also chartered by the State of Florida. 

ACBSP Accredited 

School of Business 

Florida Memorial University, through its School of Business, is accredited by the Association of 
Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) to offer the following business degrees: 

• The Bachelor of Science in Accounting 

• The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 

• The Bachelor of Science in Finance 

• The Bachelor of Science in Marketing 

CSWE Accredited 

School of Arts and Science 

Florida Memorial University, through its Social Work Program, is accredited by the Council on 
Social Work Education (CSWE) to offer the following degree: 

• The Bachelor of Social Work 
ABET ACCREDITED 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Florida Memorial University, through its Department of Computer Science, Math and 
Technology is accredited by the ABET to offer the following degree program: 

• The Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems 



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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



NASM Accredited 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Florida Memorial University, through its Department of Visual and Performing Arts, is 
accredited by National Association of Schools of Music (NASM). 

• The Bachelor of Music in Church Music 

• The Bachelor of Music in Jazz Studies 

• The Bachelor of Arts in Music 



Memberships and Affiliations 

American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) 

American Association for Higher Education 

American Council on Education 

American Library Association (ALA) 

Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) 

Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) 

Association of Fundraising Professionals 

Black Caucus of the American Library Association (BCALA) 

Council for Higher Education Accreditation 

Council of Independent Colleges 

Florida Association for Students Financial Aid Administrators 

Florida Association of Colleges and Universities 

Florida Association of Colleges for Teacher Education 

Florida Cooperative Education and Placement Association 

Florida Independent College Fund 

Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce 

Independent Colleges and Universities of Florida 

Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce 

National Association for Students Financial Aid Administrators 

National Association of College Deans, Registrars, and Admission Officers 

National Athletic Intercollegiate Association 

National Council of Educational Opportunity Associations 

National Intramural/Recreation Sports Association 

National Society of Fundraising Executives 

Public Relations Society of America 

Southeast Florida Library Information Network (SEFLIN) 

Southeastern Association of Colleges and Employers 

Southeastern Library Network (SOLINET) 

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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Southeastern Testing Association 

Southern Association for Students Financial Aid Administrators 

Southern Association of College Student Affairs 

Southern Association of Educational Opportunity Personnel Program 

Southern Regional Honors Council 

Sun Coast Conference 

The College Fund/UNCF 

United Way 



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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



CAMPUS FACILITIES AND RESOURCES 



The campus, surrounding a quiet lake, is situated on a spacious 50-acre site in Miami Gardens 
just north of the Opa-Locka Airport. The Palmetto Expressway (SR 826) is close by, offering 
easy access to 1-95, 1-75, and the Florida Turnpike. The campus complex is comprised of a 
cluster of modern air-conditioned buildings. Each building is less than a three-minute walk 
from the farthest point on campus. 

Andrew Anderson and Donald Bacon Service Center 

This one-story complex houses the offices of purchasing, facilities management and 
administrative services, and the Duplication Center. 

Sarah A. Blocker Hall 

This two-story building houses the staff of the Freshman Studies Department, faculty of the 
Department of Humanities, classrooms, and the offices of various support services. There are 
multiple laboratories: The Mathematics Resource Center, the Academic Skills Laboratory and 
the Writing Center. The Center for Advisement and Retention and the Testing Center are also 
located in the facility. 

Central Energy Plant 

This Facility houses the general maintenance department and a 3,300 sq. ft. air conditioning 
system of the university. 

Nathan W. Collier Library 

The Nathan W. Collier Library is located at the center of the Florida Memorial University 
campus. The library is an attractive two-level structure, with approximately 25,000 square feet 
of floor space with a reading room on each level, a Group Study Room and two information 
Commons housing 41 computer terminals. The seating capacity is over 500. The library 
collection is composed of over 127,000 volumes, e-books, over 50 web-based Full-Text Databases 
that provide access to the thousands of scholarly journals and newspapers and 450 
subscriptions to print journals in support of the academic programs. The library utilizes the 
Millennium Integrated Library System and it is an associate member of the Southeast Florida 
Library Information Network (SEFLIN). Through the SEFLIN consortium, students, faculty 
members and staff share book borrowing with member institutions. 



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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Florida International University/Florida Memorial University Cooperative 
Joint Use Facility 

This facility houses the Schools of Arts and Sciences, Education and School of Education 
Graduate Programs, including deans and faculty offices, as well as state-of-the-art technology- 
enhanced classrooms, laboratories, a 200 seat auditorium, and two conference rooms. 

Susie C. Holley Religious Center 

The Susie C. Holley Religious Center houses a chapel with seating for 600. The building also 
includes classroom space for religion and philosophy, and the offices of the Campus Minister 
and other religion and philosophy faculty. 

James Weldon and Rosamond Johnson Fine Arts Building 

This facility houses the Department of Visual & Performing Arts classrooms, practice rooms for 
piano, organ, and other instruments, rehearsal rooms for band and choir, an art studio, an 
amphitheater for open-air concerts, and offices for faculty. 

William Lehman Aviation Center 

This facility, named in honor of the late Congressman William Lehman, is a three-story, state-of- 
the-art complex. It contains modern spacious classrooms and laboratories, simulation trainers 
for the School of Aviation, a board join room, 200-seat auditorium with satellite downlink, 
electronic classrooms, Offices of the Provost, Interim Director for Information Management and 
Technology, Director of Grants and Sponsored Research, Director of Institutional Research, and 
School Business, Departments of Aviation and Safety, Computer Sciences and Mathematics and 
Technology, faculty offices, and an aviation education resource center. 

Royal W. Puryear Administration Building 

This facility houses the office of the President and the boardroom, the offices of the Vice- 
President for Business and Fiscal Affairs, the Vice- President for Institutional Advancement, and 
the central telephone switchboard. 

M. Athalie Range Science Hall 

This two-story building is the home of the Department of Health and Natural Sciences. 
Laboratories for the biology, chemistry, and physics programs are major features of this 
building. Space is also provided for an electronic classroom, as well as faculty offices, with 
adjoining laboratories to accommodate research and scientific experiments. 



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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 

Lou Rawls Center for the Performing Arts 

This 12 million dollar state-of-the-art facility houses the Matthew W. Gilbert 450 seat auditorium 
used for dramatic and musical productions, lectures, and assemblies. 

A. Chester Robinson Athletic Center 

The University gymnasium has a floor space of 1080 square feet for basketball, volleyball, 
indoor tennis, and other indoor sports. Adjoining the gymnasium is an L-shaped, 80 X 53 X 77- 
foot swimming pool for instruction and recreation. 

Residence Halls 

J. T. Brown - Used primarily by Freshmen males, this residence hall contains 
individual rooms, recreation and study lounges, laundry room, storage room, and space for the 
residence hall director. 

A. B. Coleman, Sr. - Upper-class male students are assigned to Coleman Hall; this 
resident hall contains individual rooms, recreation and study lounges, laundry room, storage 
room, and space for the residence hall director. 

Ray Goode - Used primarily to accommodate first-year female students, Goode Hall 
contains individual rooms, recreation and study lounges, laundry room, storage room, and 
space for the residence hall director. 

Willie C. Robinson - Used to accommodate upper-class female students, this 
residence hall contains individual rooms, recreation and study lounges, laundry room, storage 
room, and space for the residence hall director. 

Two Male Residence Halls (Building #1 and Building #3); these residence halls for 
males will contain suite-style rooms (private and semi-private) with bathrooms and 
kitchenettes, recreation and game rooms , fitness rooms, media rooms, multifunction reception 
rooms, study rooms, computer rooms, student lounges, laundry rooms, and rooms for vending 
machines. 

Two Female Residence Halls (Building #2 and Building #4); these residence halls for 
females will contain suite-style rooms (private and semi-private) with bathrooms and 
kitchenettes, recreation and game rooms , fitness rooms, media rooms, multifunction reception 
rooms, study rooms, computer rooms, student lounges, laundry rooms, and rooms for vending 
machines. In addition, Building # 2, will also have a smart classroom. 

J. C. Sams Activity Center 

The J.C. Sams Activity Center is situated by the campus lake. It contains the bookstore, 
counseling center, the university mailing center, school publication, game and entertainment 
rooms, the Sub Shop, meeting and conference rooms, space for social and cultural activities and 
an adjoining lakeside patio. 

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Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Albert E. and Sadie B. Smith Dining Hall and Conference Center 

The Albert E. and Sadie B. Smith Dining Hall and Conference Center opened in August, 2002. 
The Conference Center and Banquet Hall can accommodate 400 people or be divided into three 
areas of 133 people each. The Dining Hall can seat 560 people and has two serving areas. 

Student Services Building 

This one-story complex houses the offices of the Vice President for Student Affairs, Enrollment 
Management, Admissions, Financial Aid, Residential Life, Student Support Services, the 
University Registrar, Career Development, Student Accounts, and the Office of the Bursar. 

Off-Campus Site 

Florida Memorial University services the citizens of Broward County with our off-campus site 
located at 4620 North State Road 7, Building H, Suite 200, Lauderdale Lakes, FL 33319, 
telephone (954) 714-2442. Students may select general education and many upper-level courses. 



CAMPUS DIRECTORY 



Campus Address 

Campus Number: 

Campus Fax: 

Center for Advisement and Retention 

Academic Affairs Office 

Academic Schools 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Department of 
Aviation & Safety 

Computer Sciences & Mathematics 

Social Sciences 

Health and Natiwal Sciences 

Humanities 

Visual and Performing Arts 
School of Business 
Graduate Program (MBA) 
School of Education 

Graduate Programs (MSED) 
Admissions 
E-mail address: admit@fmuniv.edu 



15800 NW 42nd Ave. 

Miami Gardens, Florida 33054 

(305) 626-3600 

(305) 626-3769 

(305) 623-4231 

(305) 623-4223 



(305) 623-1440 
(305) 623-4100 
(305) 623-1408 
(305) 626-3699 
(305) 626-3128 
(305) 626-3683 
(305) 623-4288 
(305) 626-3629 
(305) 623-4279 
(305) 623-4280 
(305) 626-3758 



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Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Alumni Affairs 

Athletic Department 

Bookstore 

Career Placement Office 

Counseling Office 

Dean of Students 

Financial Aid 

Fiscal Affairs 

University Bursar 

Freshman Studies 

Health Clinic 

Housing 

Institutional Advancement 

International Students 

Library 

Public Relations 

Registrar 

Transcripts 
Transfer Credits 
Veteran Affairs 

Security 

Student Activities 

Student Affairs 

Student Support Services 

Testing 



(305) 626-3657 
(305) 626-3166 
(305) 626-3726 
(305) 626-3782 
(305) 626-3138 
(305) 626-0913 
(305) 626-3742 
(305) 626-3623 
(305) 626-3739 
(305) 626-3662 
(305) 626-3760 
(305)626-3718 
(305) 626-3608 
(305) 626-3751 
(305) 626-3641 
(305) 626-3624 
(305) 626-3752 



(305) 626-3771 
(305) 626-3715 
(305) 626-3710 
(305) 626-3721 
(305)626-3775 



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STUDENT AFFAIRS 



ADMISSIONS 



REQUIREMNTS FOR ADMISSIONS TO THE UNIVERSITY 

Florida Memorial University welcomes applications from men and women regardless of race 
color, sex, religion, age, or handicap. Our Admission decisions are based primarily on an 
applicant's academic promise as demonstrated by academic preparation, recommendation 
letter(s), personal statement, and SAT or ACT scores. 

A. FRESHMEN APPLICANTS 

1. Submit Application and Non Refundable Application of Fee $25.00 
Application is available online at http://vvvvw.fmuniv.edu/home/admissions 

2. Admissions Test Scores 

Applicants should submit SAT or ACT scores. Test scores are used for advisement and 
placement purposes for first-time college applicants. 

3. High School Transcript 

Graduation from an accredited high school or the equivalent (GED) is required. A student's 
high school preparation should include units in the following core areas: 

English 4 Units (3 with substantial writing) 

Mathematics 3 Units (Algebra I and above) 

Natural Science 3 Units (2 with lab) 

Social Science 3 Units 

Foreign Language 2 Units (in the same language) 

Approved Electives 4 units. 

4. Other Admissions Requirements 

The applicants must also submit the following to be considered for admission: 

• At least one letter of recommendation 

• A personal statement. 

B. TRANSFER APPLICANTS 

Students transferring to Florida Memorial University from another college or university are 
admitted on the basis of credits and grade point average earned in course work at the 
collegiate level. 



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1. Grade Point Average 

Transfer students must have earned a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in 
collegiate course work. However, grade point averages do not transfer to Florida Memorial 
University. 

2. Transfer Students from Community Colleges. 

Transfer applicants who possess the Associate of Arts (AA) degree from regionally 
accredited junior, community or four-year colleges at the time they are admitted to Florida 
Memorial University will be accepted as juniors, with the understanding that some 
prerequisite work may be required to fulfill degree requirements in their major at Florida 
Memorial University. Course work for students who enroll without the AA degree will be 
evaluated on a course-by-course basis. 

3. Definition of Credit Hour 

Florida Memorial University defines one academic credit hour to be 700 minutes of 
instruction per term, excluding final examinations, for regular lecture courses. Laboratory, 
internship, studio music, practicum, and certain other types of courses may be assigned 
credit hours that are different from the contact time, based on the type of instructional 
delivery. 

4. Transfer Credits 

In order to fulfill its mission to serve a culturally diverse student population arid to prepare 
students to function in a highly competitive, technological, and global society, Florida 
Memorial University seeks to make transfer of credit easier for students, while continuing to 
honor its obligation to maintain academic quality and integrity. Therefore, Florida Memorial 
University accepts courses earned at other post-secondary institutions, provided that: 

• The grade earned for these courses is a "C" or higher; 

• The courses represent collegiate coursework relevant to the degree program 

being pursued at Florida Memorial University; 

• The course content, level of instruction, and resulting competencies are 

equivalent to those of students enrolled at Florida Memorial University; and 

• All official transcripts are submitted to the University for evaluation prior to the 

transfer student's admission to the University. 

A maximum of 90 credits total may be transferred to Florida Memorial University. The school's 
dean and the Provost must approve all transfer credits used toward a degree. A minimum of 
25% of the credit hours required for a student's degree must be earned by instruction at Florida 
Memorial University. 



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TRANSFER CREDITS FROM INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

Postsecondary credits earned by international students at colleges and universities which 
pattern themselves after the British or other non-American education systems must be 
evaluated by an external transcript evaluation organization approved by Florida Memorial 
University. 

C. International Applicants 

International students are admitted on the basis of high school work. International students 
must meet the requirements of the University as stated in the previous section and comply 
with the following. 

High School Transcripts 

An international applicant must have graduated from a high school or secondary school. An 

official transcript and/or original diploma are required. 

1. High School Work 

International students who studied in the British educational system should have passed 
a minimum of five (5) subjects at the ordinary level in the General Certificate 
Examination or its equivalent, including English and mathematics. If student transcripts 
are not in English, students will also need to submit an official translation of their 
transcripts. Evaluations must be conducted through a member of the National 
Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) Organization or the 
recommended agencies below: 

Josef Silny & Associates 

7101 SW 102 Avenue 

Miami, FL 33171 

Tel: (305) 273-1616 

Fax:(305)273-1338 

http://www.silny.com or email info@jsilny.com 

World Education Services 

P. O. Box 745 

New York, NY 10113-0745 

(212)966-6311 

http://www.wes.org or email info@wes.org 

Educational Credential Evaluators, Inc. 

P.O. Box 514070 
Milwaukee, WI 53203-3470 
Phone: (414) 289-3400 
www.ece.org 

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2. Language Requirement 

If a student's native language is not English, proficiency in English must be established 
by a satisfactory TOEFL score (500 written /173 Computer /60 Internet). 

3. Standardized Test Scores 

International students should submit scores from either the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
(SAT) or the American College Test (ACT). 

International Transfer Students must meet the requirements of the University as stated in the 
previous section and comply with the following: 

1. Follow United States Citizenship and Immigration Services regulations regarding 
transfer of schools 

2. Complete and provide International Student Advisor with Transfer Release Form if 
transferring from another U.S. School 

3. Complete the Financial Statement of Support. 

D. ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

Florida Memorial University is an approved participant in the College Board's Advanced 
Placement Program. Students whose Advanced Placement scores meet the criteria as set 
forth in each academic area will receive university credit for courses covering similar 
material. 

E. INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE 

Florida Memorial University recognizes and gives college credit to students who successfully 
complete the International Baccalaureate examinations with grades of 4 or higher. An 
official IB transcript is required and must be sent directly from the International 
Baccalaureate Office. 

F. EARLY ADMISSION 

Florida Memorial University grants early admission to exceptional high school students who 
meet the following criteria: 

1. Earned a minimum high school grade point average of 3.0 

2. Scored 1000 or more on the SAT or 21 or more on the ACT. 

3. Submitted three letters or recommendation from high school officials such as a principal, 
counselor, and teacher. 



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CONDITIONAL ADMISSION 

Admission consideration may be given to students who do not meet the admission standards as 
stated above. Such students may be admitted conditionally. 

RE-ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY 

Students whose enrollment at Florida Memorial University is interrupted for more than one 
semester are required to submit an application for readmission. The application must be sent to 
the Office of Admissions. Students placed on academic suspension must sit out one semester 
(fall or spring) before eligibility for readmission is restored. 

Students in good academic standing who voluntarily withdraw from the University for one or 
more academic years are required to apply for readmission. A student must satisfy the degree 
requirements for graduation stated in the university catalog for the academic year in which the 
student is readmitted. 



Financial Aid 

T5Financial Aid is money in the form of scholarships, grants, work-study (part-time on campus 
employment to be used solely for school-related expenses), and loans awarded to assist students 
who otherwise would not be able to afford the cost of attending college. Financial Aid is 
awarded according to an individual's financial need and/or academic excellence. 

The Office of Financial Aid is located in the Student Services Building, Suite 159. Its primary 
objective is to ensure available funds are provided to eligible students in order that they may 
have access to a Florida Memorial University education. 

The University expects the family (parents and students) to assume the primary responsibility 
for financing the cost of attending college. We recognize that most families need assistance. 
The amount of help needed is determined by calculating the family's ability to pay. That 
amount, called the estimated family contribution (EFC), plus other outside funds that may be 
available to the student, is subtracted from the allowable cost of attendance. The resulting 
difference is called "Financial Need." 

We normally package (or combine), the various forms of financial aid in the following order: 
scholarships, grants, work-study and loans. Funds are limited and students are encouraged to 
apply early for financial aid. 



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How Soon to Apply 

Applications are available beginning January 1st each year, and families are encouraged to 
apply early for financial aid. Some programs handled by the Office of Financial Aid have very 
early priority dates. Students applying on or before these dates are given priority for the 
program. Those who apply after these dates are considered late and will only be eligible for 
these programs if additional funds become available. 

Student Alert 

Applications for financial aid will be considered when ALL required documents are received. 
To be considered for the majority of programs, students are advised to begin applying in 
January of the year they wish to start school and have ALL required documents submitted by 
April 1 st of that same year. 

Distribution of Funds 

Based on the information provided on the FAFSA by the student and parents, the Office of 
Financial Aid at Florida Memorial University will determine which funds the student is eligible 
to receive. An applicant must (1) show financial need, (2) be accepted or enrolled as a full-time 
student in an eligible program, (3) be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, (4) be capable of 
maintaining a satisfactory academic standing and normal progress toward a degree, (5) be 
registered with the Selective Service if required to do so, and (6) have not defaulted on any 
previous aid. 

Important Notice 

Financial Aid is distributed the first week after the drop/add period has ended. Only students 
with completed financial aid files will have their aid distributed. 

Evaluation and Awarding Process 

The Office of Financial Aid will determine the student's allowable educational expenses and the 
expected family resources. The difference between the two is the demonstrated need. Florida 
Memorial University will try to provide financial aid for all or a portion of the demonstrated 
need in the form of an Award Letter consisting of grants, scholarships, work-study, and loans. 

Satisfactory Academic Progress 

Federal regulations require the University to establish satisfactory academic progress for the 
receipt of Title IV Student Financial Aid. Two major components are evaluated in the 
determination of satisfactory academic progress: 

1. The qualitative component is the student's Grade Point Average (GPA) displayed on 
the academic transcript. 

2. The quantitative component is the maximum timeframe in which a student is expected 
to complete his/her degree program. 



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Florida Memorial University Office of Financial Aid reviews student records on an annual basis 
at the end of the academic year. Students who do not achieve satisfactory academic progress, 
will be notified. 

The minimum number of semester hours per academic year is 21 semester hours for the Federal 
programs, and 24 semester hours for Florida programs-Florida Student Assistance Grant 
(FSAG) and Florida Resident Access Grant (FRAG) Programs. Additionally, a minimum 
cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 1.85 for freshmen and 2.0 for all others must be 
maintained for all Federal programs. For the Florida programs, all students must maintain a 2.0 
cumulative GPA. 

Enrollment Status 

To receive financial aid a student enrollment status is determined as follows: 
Under-graduate Enrollment Status: 

• Full-time 12 or more credit hours 

• Three quarter time 9 to 1 1 credit hours 

• One - half time 6 to 8 credit hours 

• Less than half time 3 to 5 credits hours 

Students who carry fewer than (6) credit hours are ineligible for the Federal Direct Loans 
Programs. The only Title IV Financial Aid Program those students are eligible to receive is the 
Pell Grant which allows payment for less than half-time. 

Non-Degree Seeking Students 

Students who are enrolled as special (non-degree seeking) students are NOT ELIGIBLE for any 

type of financial aid programs. 

Transfer Students 

Students who have previously attended other colleges and post-secondary institutions must 
submit academic transcripts from those schools to the Financial Aid office. 

Eligible Non-Citizens 

Eligible noncitizens or U.S. permanent residents must provide copies of their Alien 
Registration ID cards to the Financial Aid office. 

Withdrawals 

Distribution of Financial Aid is for direct educational costs-tuition and fees, and room and 
board. Students who withdraw after receiving distribution of Title IV funds can expect a pro- 
rata calculation to be performed on their account and may incur a bill from Florida Memorial 
University, if they have withdrawn prior to earning the financial aid that was distributed to 
them. 



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Transferability of Financial Aid Awards 

The Office of Financial Aid at Florida Memorial University does not transfer aid to other 
colleges and does not have a Financial Aid Consortium Agreement with any other college. 
Should a student decide to transfer to another college, a separate application for financial aid 
must be made to that institution. 

International Students 

International students are not eligible for federal and state aid. They may, however, qualify for 
college scholarships and may participate in the Institutional College Work-Study Program 
(INSTWS). International students are warned that in many instances these programs provide 
only enough financial aid to cover a portion of the college expenses. The burden of financial 
responsibility will be on the student and his or her family to pay the costs of attending the 
Florida Memorial University. 

Financial Aid Programs 

The Office of Financial Aid at Florida Memorial University offers the following types of aid to 
eligible students: 

• Grants and Scholarships are awards (gift aid) that do not require repayment or work 

obligation. 

• Employment awards are awards that allow students to earn a portion of their educational 

expenses through part-time employment with eligible on-campus employers. 

• Loans are awards that must be repaid with low interest after the student is no longer 

enrolled at least half-time in a post-secondary institution. 

Grants, scholarships, employment and some loan programs are normally need-based forms of 
financial aid. A student's demonstrated financial need is determined by the standardized 
methodology performed by the Central Processor of the Department of Education Financial Aid 
System when the student applies for financial aid by completing a Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA). Most awards to students are made up of a combination of two or more 
types of aid programs and are referred to as a "financial aid package". Completing the FAFSA, 
along with the Florida Memorial University Institutional Application makes a student eligible 
for most grant, scholarship and employment programs; however, additional applications are 
required for the awarding of loans and some scholarships. 

Non-Florida Residents 

Additional financial aid may be available to non-Florida residents through their state of 
permanent residence. Students should contact their appropriate State Department of Education 
for additional Information. 

Summer School Assistance 

Summer school students enrolled for at least 6 credit hours may apply for financial aid. Awards 
for summer sessions will be made if funds are available after the regular academic year. To be 

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considered for Summer Financial Aid Awards, the student must have a completed financial aid 
file for the current academic year. Summer session concludes the academic year at Florida 
Memorial University. 

Federal Pell Grant Program 

This federally sponsored program provides financial aid to those who need it to attend 
approved colleges or universities. Awards range from $200 to $5,775 per academic year 
depending on a family's financial situation. To apply for this program, a student must complete 
the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) from the U.S. Department of Education. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) 

A very limited number of SEOG awards are made to those with exceptional financial need who 
are also Pell Grant recipients. A typical award ranges from $200 up to $1,400 per academic year. 
To apply for this program, a student must complete the Free Application for Federal Student 
Aid (FAFSA). 

TEACH Grant Program 

Through the College Cost Reduction and Access Act of 2007, Congress created the Teacher 
Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) Grant Program that provides 
grants of up to $4,000 per year to students who intend to teach in a public or private elementary 
or secondary school that serves students from low-income families. In exchange for receiving a 
TEACH Grant, students must agree to serve as full-time teachers in a high-need field in a public 
or private elementary or secondary school that serves low-income students (see below for more 
information on high-need fields and schools serving low-income students). As a recipient of a 
TEACH Grant, graduates must teach for at least four academic years within eight calendar 
years of completing the program of study for which they received a TEACH Grant. 

IMPORTANT: If a student fails to complete this service obligation, all amounts of TEACH 
Grants that received will be converted to a Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan which 
must then be repaid this to the U.S. Department of Education. Interest will be charged from the 
date the grant(s) was disbursed. Note: TEACH Grant recipients will be given a 6-month grace 
period prior to entering repayment if a TEACH Grant is converted to a Direct Unsubsidized 
Loan. To apply for this program, a student must complete the Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA) from the U.S. Department of Education. 

Florida Student Assistance Grant Program (FSAG) 

To receive FSAG, students must be full-time undergraduates with Financial Aid Need* and 
attend an eligible Florida institution. He or she must be a "Bona-fide Florida Resident for 
tuition purposes" defined as an independent person who has, or a dependent person who has a 
parent or legal guardian that has established and maintained legal residency in Florida for at 
least twelve (12) months prior to seeking enrollment in a post secondary institution. Renewal 
students must have earned 24 semester hours with a minimum of 2.0 GPA each academic year. 
You are eligible to receive this award for a maximum of 9 semesters. A student who does not 

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meet the annual minimum 24 semester hours with the minimum 2.0 GPA each academic year 
may not receive funding the following academic year. 

Florida Resident Access Grant (FRAG) 

To receive FRAG, you must be a full-time undergraduate student who attends an eligible 
independent Florida institution. You must be a "Bona-fide Florida Resident for tuition 
purposes". Which is an independent person who has, or a dependent person who has a parent 
or legal guardian that has established and maintained legal residency in Florida for at least 
twelve (12) months prior to seeking enrollment in a post secondary institution. Renewal 
students must have earned 24 semester hours with a minimum of 2.0 GPA each academic year. 
Students are eligible to receive this award for a maximum of 9 semesters. A student who does 
not meet the annual minimum 24 semester hours with the minimum 2.0 GPA each academic 
year may not receive funding the following academic year. 

Federal Work Study Program (FWS) 

This program provides jobs for a very limited number of students with financial need who must 
earn a part of their educational expenses. The Financial Aid office arranges jobs on campus for 
eligible recipients. Students work a maximum of 20 hours per week, scheduled not to conflict 
with their classes. An average award is about $1, 400 per academic year. Students are paid by 
electronic payroll deposits and must provide 1) a direct deposit request form from their 
financial institution; 2) a completed 1-9; 3) a completed W-4 form and 4) a work-study contract. 
To apply for this program, a student must complete the Free Application for Federal Student 
Aid (FAFSA). On the FAFSA, a student must indicate his or her interest in a "part-time job" or 
"work-study." 

Florida Memorial Institutional College Work-Study Program (FMUINSTW) 

This program provides jobs for a very limited number of students with financial need who must 
earn a part of their educational expenses. The Financial Aid office arranges jobs on campus for 
international student workers. Awards are based on available funds and not guaranteed. To 
apply for this program, a student must contact the Student Financial Aid office. 

To apply for the following programs, a student must complete the Florida Memorial University 
Financial Aid Institutional Application. 

Federal Direct -Subsidized Loan 

This is a low-interest loan made to students by the federal government. Eligibility for a 
"subsidized" Federal Direct/Stafford Loan is based on financial need as determined by a 
federally mandated formula. "Subsidized" means that the federal government will pay the 
interest on the loan while a student is in school and during specified deferments. Eligible 
freshmen may borrow up to $3,500 per year, sophomores up to $4,500; and juniors and seniors 
may borrow up to $5,500 per year. The maximum allowable undergraduate indebtedness for the 
Federal Direct Subsidized Loan is $23,000. Federal Direct/Stafford Loans are disbursed in two 
installments: one in the fall semester and one in the spring semester, after enrollment for each 

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semester. When the loan is disbursed, a federally required origination fee of 1 percent (which is 
used to offset administrative costs of the program) is deducted from the loan by the 
government, along with a nonrefundable insurance fee of up to 1 percent of the principal 
amount of the loan. Repayment begins six months after the borrower's last enrollment on at 
least a half-time basis. 

Federal Direct-Unsubsidized Loan 

The Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan is a low interest loan made to students by the federal 
government. Under this program, the student borrower (and not the federal government) pays 
the interest that accrues on the loan while the student is in school. Eligibility for a Federal Direct 
Unsubsidized Loan is determined by the Financial Aid office using a federally mandated 
formula. Eligible dependent students may borrow up to $3,000 per semester. Dependent 
students whose parents have been declined the Federal PLUS due to adverse credit may 
increase their unsubsidized borrowing by an additional $3,000 per semester, bringing their total 
eligibility in the Unsubsidized Loan Program to $9,000. Eligible independent students may 
borrow up to $3,500 per semester and up to $10,500 per year. A student who shows need for 
only part of an annual subsidized Federal Direct/Stafford Loan may borrow the remainder 
through an unsubsidized loan. The maximum allowable loan undergraduate indebtedness for 
the Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan is $34,500. When the loan is disbursed, a federally 
required origination fee of 0.5 percent (which is used to offset administrative costs of the 
program) is deducted from the loan by the government or bank, along with a nonrefundable 
insurance fee of up to 0.5 percent of the principal amount of the loan. 

Federal PLUS Loan (Parent's Loan) 

The Federal PLUS Loan is a federally insured loan and is based on credit-worthiness as 
determined by them. The interest rate for the Federal PLUS Loan varies annually (a new rate is 
effective each July 1), and the rate is based on the 52-week U.S. Treasury Bill rate plus 3.10 
percent not to exceed 9 percent. Federal PLUS Loans are disbursed to the college in two 
installments: one in the fall semester and one in the spring semester, after enrollment for each 
semester. When the loan is disbursed, a federally required origination fee of 3 percent (which is 
used to offset administrative costs of the program) is deducted from the loan by the 
government, along with a nonrefundable insurance fee of up to 1 percent of the principal 
amount of the loan. Parents of dependent students may borrow up to the cost of education 
minus any financial aid. These loans, in combination with all other aid (including loans) may 
not exceed the educational cost. Repayment of principal and interest begins 60 days after the 
loan is disbursed. 

Florida Academic Scholars Award, Florida Merit Scholars Award, and Florida Gold Seal 
Vocational Scholars Award 

To receive Florida Bright Futures Scholarships, students must complete a free Initial Student 
Florida Financial Aid Application during the last year in high school (after December 1 and prior 
to graduation) by accessing www.FloridaStudentFinancialAid.org online. Renewal students 



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who receive funding during the current academic year must have earned 24 semester hours 
with a minimum of 2.75 GPA each academic year. 

Florida Mary McLeod Bethune Scholarship Fund 

To receive a MMB scholarship, students must meet certain scholastic requirements, demonstrate 
financial need, and attend Florida Memorial University, Florida Agricultural & Mechanical 
University, Bethune Cookman, or Edward Waters College. Students must be enrolled as full- 
time undergraduates and be at least one-year Florida Residents as determined by the institution. 
Renewal students must have earned 24 semester hours with a minimum of 3.0 GPA each 
academic year. 

Air Force ROTC and Army ROTC 

ROTC academic scholarships are offered to students who meet specific requirements. These 
scholarships cover the cost of the University's tuition and books and provide the student a tax 
free subsistence allowance per month. For more information on ROTC scholarships, contact 
Captain Arnold Tolbert at (305) 626-4277. The current academic criteria for each award are 
included in the Application for Admission. The criteria may also be obtained from the Office of 
Admissions and the Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. 

Presidential Scholarship 

The Presidential Scholarship is offered to high school graduates who will enter college for the 
first time. The award covers the cost of full-time tuition after all federal and/or state financial aid 
and other external scholarships have been applied. Upon enrollment, students must register for 
at least 12 semester hours (college-credit courses) and maintain a 3.50 cumulative grade point 
average to renew the awards. Awards may be renewed for a maximum of 10 semesters of study. 

Honors Scholarships 

The Honors Scholarship is available to high school graduates who are entering college for the 
first time. The award is $2,000 per year after all federal and/or state financial aid and other 
external scholarships have been applied. The award does not cover room and board or books. 
Students must register for at least 12 credit hours and maintain a 3.3 GPA and earn 24 credit 
hours per academic year to renew the scholarship. The scholarship awards may be renewed for 
a maximum of 8 semesters of study. 

Freshman, New and Transfer Student Orientation 

A collaborative effort between the Offices of Student and Academic Affairs is designed to help 
entering freshman and new/transfer students become adjusted and make a successful transition 
to university life at Florida Memorial University. During the orientation period, students attend 
a series of workshops, seminars, and social activities where they are presented information 
about the University's history, support centers, services, facilities, testing, and placement. 
Students are also presented with University policies and regulations, introductions to 
University personnel in both formal and informal settings and are assigned an academic advisor 
who assists them throughout the year. Registration is also an integral component of the 

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orientation program. The objective of the orientation period is to provide students with 
information that will help them cope with the independence and responsibility of becoming a 
university student. 

Anti-Hazing Policy 

Hazing of students will not be a part of any initiation practices, whether for new students, social 
clubs, or Greek-letter organizations. Hazing done in the name of an organization can result in 
the organization's loss of privileges, including suspension of its operating privileges on campus. 
Hazing done by a student as an independent act can result in the student's dismissal from the 
University. Violation of this regulation must be reported to the Vice President for Student 
Affairs. All cases involving hazing will be referred to the Judicial Affairs Committee. 

Grievance Procedures for Students 

Florida Memorial University has adopted an internal grievance procedure providing for the 
prompt and equitable resolution of complaints alleging any action prohibited by this anti- 
hazing policy and/or conduct in violation of Title VI, Title VII, Title IX, Section 504, the Age 
Discrimination Act, and the Americans with Disability Act. The following university officials 
have been designated to respond to allegations regarding any such violation: The Vice 
President for Student Affairs, The Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs, the Director 
of Human Resources Management, or the Counseling Center Coordinator. 

Complaints alleging misconduct as defined in this policy should be reported within 90 days of 
the alleged offense. Complainants may seek informal or formal resolution. All complainants 
must complete a written Discriminatory Harassment Report in the form of a memorandum. 
The report must include the name of the person or office alleged to have committed the offense, 
the date(s) or time period of the offenses, specific examples of the offending behavior(s) or 
actions, and the complainants contact information. 

Complainants are encouraged to explore an informal resolution before filing a formal 
complaint. An informal resolution focuses on communication and education, while formal 
procedures focus on investigation and discipline. Informal complaints will be resolved within 
15 working days with a written resolution given to each of the parties involved. If the situation 
results in an impasse, complainants will be given a notice of impasse with 15 working days 
from the filing of the incident. If a notice of impasse is given and complainants wish to file a 
formal written complaint, complainants must do so within 30 working days of the date of notice 
of impasse unless a waiver in filing time is requested. 

When a formal complaint is filed, an investigation will be initiated. The person accused of 
misconduct will be given 10 days to provide a signed response to the requesting official. A copy 
will be provided to the complainant. If the alleged fails to respond, the presumption will be 
made that the allegation(s) in the complaint are true. A written determination will be issued to 
the complainant within 60 working days of the receipt of the formal written complaint. If the 



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procedure requires an extension of time, the complainant will be informed in writing of the 
reasons, the status of the investigation, and the probable date of completion. 
If complainants dispute the findings or are dissatisfied with the recommendations, 
complainants may request reconsideration of the case to the president in writing within 45 
working days of receipt of the written determination. Complainants also have the right to file 
with the appropriate state or federal authorities as set forth in the applicable statutes. 

Cases that may require disciplinary action will be handled in accordance to the established 
discipline procedures of the University. Student organizations in violation of this policy may be 
subject to the loss of university recognition. Complainants shall be protected from unfair 
retribution. Nothing in this policy statement is intended to infringe on the individual rights, 
freedom of speech, or academic freedom provided to members of the Florida Memorial 
community. The scholarly, educational, or artistic content of any written or oral presentation or 
inquiry shall not be limited by this policy. Accordingly, this provision will be liberally 
construed but should not be used as a pretext for violation of this policy. 

Student Concerns and Complaint Policies 

This policy provides a process for students to raise concerns and file complaints when they are 
dissatisfied with a University service, or policy, or an action by a University employee. The 
process aims to be constructive and positive in resolving differences and working toward a 
better community at Florida Memorial University. 

This policy covers academic and non-academic matters except in areas where other formal 
policies and procedures take precedence. These other policies include the Grade Appeal Policy, 
Policy Prohibiting Discrimination and Harassment, Standards of Conduct, and the Honor Code. 

General principles 

• Whenever possible and in a timely manner, students should raise concerns informally 
with the faculty member, staff member, or other student involved. 

• If the student is unsuccessful with informal resolution, the complaint should be taken to 
the appropriate division chair, school dean, or vice president who will handle student 
complaints as quickly and as fairly as possible. 

• As a measure of good faith, students should be prepared to make their identities known 
when they raise concerns or complaints. Matters raised anonymously will not be 
addressed formally. 

• There will be no adverse effect on or retaliation against a student raising a concern or 
complaint in good faith or against any person who in good faith provides information 
regarding a concern or complaint. 

• Written complaints will receive written responses within 30 days and will be kept on 
file. 



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A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Procedures 



Academic matters: if a student has a complaint or concern about a course or faculty 
member, it should be directed first to the appropriate division chair or school dean, then 
to the provost. If the student has a complaint about an academic policy or its 
enforcement, it should be addressed to the office of the Provost and Vice President for 
Academic Affairs. 

Non-academic matters: If a student has a complaint or concern about a non-academic 
matter, it should be addressed to the Vice President for Student Affairs. 

Tuition and Fees 





Fall 2011 


Spring 2012 


Annual 


Summer 2012 


Commuter Students 










Tuition(12-15 Hours) 


$6,012.00 


$6,012.00 


$12,024.00 


$6,012.00 


General Fees 


$1,270.00 


$1,270.00 


$2,540.00 


$625.00 


Total -Commuter Students 


$7,012.00 


$7,012.00 


$14,024.00 


$6,637.00 


Residential Students 










Existing Rooms 


$1,630.00 


$1,630.00 


$3,260.00 


$1,019.00 


Board 


$1,426.00 


$1,426.00 


$2,852.00 


$891.00 


Room & Board-Existing 


$3,056.00 


$3,056.00 


$6,112.00 


$1,910.00 


New Residence Halls: 










Private Suites(lBR-lBA) 


$2,520.00 


$2,520.00 


$5,040.00 


$1,575.00 


Board 


$1,426.00 


$1,426.00 


$2,852.00 


$891.00 


Room & Board- Priv. 1 


$3,946.00 


$3,946.00 


$7,892.00 


$2,466.00 


Semi-Private Suites (2BR-1BA) 


$1,935.00 


$1,935.00 


$3,870.00 


$1,209.00 


Board 


$1,426.00 


$1,426.00 


$2,852.00 


$891.00 


Room & Board-Semi -Priv. 


$3,361.00 


$3,361.00 


$6,722.00 


$2,100.00 


Private Suites (2BR-1 BR) 


$2,295.00 


$2,295.00 


$4,590.00 


$1,434.00 


Board 


$1,426.00 


$1,426.00 


$2,852.00 


$891.00 


Room & Board-Priv. 2 


$3,721.00 


$3,721.00 


$7,442.00 


$2,325.00 


Quad Suites (4BR-2BA) 


$2,070.00 


$2,070.00 


$4,140.00 


$1,294.00 


Board 


$1,426.00 


$1,426.00 


$2,852.00 


$891.00 


Room & Board-Quad. 


$3,496.00 


$3,496.00 


$6,992.00 


$2,185.00 



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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



The total cost of tuition, fees, room and board is calculated by adding the cost for tuition and 
fees to the cost for room and board depending on the residence type above. 

Admission Application $25.00 

Course Add/Drop $10.00 

Undergraduate Credit By Exam (each credit hour) $501.00 

Graduate Credit By Exam (each credit hour) $663.23 

Graduation $200.00 

Key/Damage Deposit (refundable) $50.00 

Dorm Damages $25.00 & up 

Document Photocopy $0.10 

Late Registration Fee $50.00 

Library Fines per day per book $0.25 

Library Lost Book Charge $50.00 

Mailbox key deposit (refundable) $10.00 

Mailbox rental Fee $10.00 

Parking Decal w/Transponder $15.00 

Parking Citation $15.00 & up 

Failure to early register $50.00 

Promissory note Fee $50.00 

Replacement Diploma $10.00 

Replacement I.D. Card $25.00 

Room Reservation Fee-new student $250.00 

Returned Check Fee $25.00 

Tuition Installment Plan- late payment Fee * $25.00 

Transcript, Regular US Mail $3.00 

Transcript, Certified US Mail $6.00 

Transcript, Next day delivery $12.00 

Transcript, Overseas $18.00 & up 

Tuition per credit hour Undergraduate $501.00 

Tuition per credit hour Graduate $663.23 

*NON-REFUNDABLE 

The schedule of tuition, fees and service charges is reviewed and published annually. Current 
information on these amounts is available at the Student Accounts Office. The University 
reserves the right to change without notice its tuition, fees, service charges, rules, and 
regulations at the beginning of any semester and during the year should conditions so warrant. 
This right will be exercised judiciously. 

Description of Service Charges 

Books, school supplies, travel expenses, medical expenses other than those provided on-campus 
and through the Student Health Insurance Program, and miscellaneous personal items are 
additional expenses which must be considered when preparing a student's budget. 

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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Admission Application: A fee of $25 must be sent to the University with each application for 

admission. This fee is nonrefundable and is not credited to the student's account upon 

admission. 

Course Add/Drop: A fee of $10 is charged for each course added or dropped from a student's 

schedule after the close of registration. 

Credit fry Exam: A $501 per credit hour examination fee is charged for departmental proficiency 
examinations for undergraduate credit. A $663.23 per credit hour examination fee is charged 
for departmental proficiency examinations for graduate credit. 

Graduation: A fee of $200 is charged to graduating students for their caps and gowns, the 
graduation banquet, and other ceremonial activities related to the Baccalaureate and 
Commencement exercises. All graduates must pay this charge even if they choose not to 
participate in the activities. 

Room Reservation Fee: All new students desiring on-campus housing are required to pay a 
room reservation fee of $250 ($200 for all returning students each semester) prior to arriving on 
campus. If for any reason a student decides not to attend Florida Memorial University or 
changes his/her mind about residing on campus, the reservation fee is nonrefundable and will 
not be credited to the student's account. All resident students are assigned a mailbox. The rental 
fee is $10 per academic year plus a $10 refundable deposit for the mailbox key. All keys should 
be returned at the end of each semester. 

Key/Damage Deposit: A $50 deposit must be paid on or before registration by every student 
who will live in the residence hall. This deposit is not a part of the housing fee. It will be 
refunded when the student leaves his/her campus residence hall, provided he/she (1) checks out 
properly, (2) returns his/her room and mailbox keys and other University property, (3) is not 
responsible for any damages to University property, (4) does not have an account balance with 
the University and (5) has observed University policies concerning room cancellations and 
withdrawals from the residence hall. Refunds are not done automatically. An application for a 
refund must be submitted to the Bursar's Office. 

Late Registration: A fee of $50 is charged to any student who registers for courses after the last 
day scheduled for registration in the University catalog or as published by the Registrar. All 
currently enrolled students who do not register early during the early registration period for the 
next semester will be assessed a $50 fee during regular registration. 

Meals: All resident students are required to purchase a semester board (meal) plan. If the Lion's 
Express ID card is lost, stolen, washed, destroyed, misplaced or damaged, a student should 
report this immediately to the Living and Learning Advisor and apply for a replacement at the 
cashier's window (cost is $25 for a replacement). Non-resident students may purchase twenty 
(25) meals for $112. These twenty-five meals will be credited to the Lion's Express ID card and 
can be used for any meal in the cafeteria. No one is permitted to eat in the cafeteria without his 

35 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



or her computerized Lion's Express ID card or cash payment. If the card is lost, damaged, stolen 
or invalid, students must report this to the Bursar Office. Food Service is not responsible for the 
issuance of ID cards. 

Parking Decal: A fee of $15 per year is charged for a parking decal and transponder which 
registers a vehicle for use of campus roadways and parking facilities. An additional fee of $15 
per year is required for the purchase of a replacement decal or second-car decal. A valid ID, 
driver's license, car registration and insurance information are required. 

Replacement Diploma: A fee of $10 is charged to replace a diploma. Requests must be made 
through the Registrar's Office. 

Replacement I.D. Card: A fee of $25 is charged to replace a lost or stolen University Lion's 
Express identification card. 

Returned Checks: Pursuant to Florida law, any check issued to the University for which 
sufficient funds are not available to ensure payment upon presentation is subject to a returned 
check fee of $25. 

Room and Board: Students who reside on campus must pay the full Room and Board fee. 
Room and board fees provide for the use of dormitory space access and during the period stated 
in the University calendar. 

Promissory Note Fee: A processing fee of $50 is charged to defray the cost of providing a 
deferred payment plan for students who are unable to pay the full amount of their bill at the 
time of registration. 

Transcript Fee: A fee of $3 is charged for each requested copy of a transcript. Transcripts will be 
sent by regular US mail. If requested, transcripts may be sent by Certified US mail for a fee of 
$6, or by next day delivery for $12 or overseas for $18 and up depending on the destination. 

Payment of Tuition and Fees 

1. All tuition and fees are due and payable at the time of registration. 

2. Students who receive financial aid must pay the difference between their financial aid 
awards and their total charges for the semester before being permitted to attend classes 
for a given semester. 

3. Financial Aid classified as "pending" or "applied for" will not be accepted toward 
meeting the requirements for registration unless a positive evaluation is given by the 
Director of Financial Aid or his/her designee. 

Students may choose to pay charges owed for an upcoming semester through a University- 
approved semester-long installment plan. All inquiries and applications should be made 
directly to Tuition Management Services (TMS), Tuition Installment Plan, or call toll free 1- 

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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



800-722-4867. Notification of awards and scholarships from outside sources used to pay a 
student's account must be sent directly to the Student Accounts Office from the sponsor. The 
notice must either accompany the payment or state the manner in which the sponsor is to be 
billed. 

Bursar 

Florida Memorial University 

15800 NW 42nd Avenue 

Miami Gardens, Florida 33054 

When payment is made in cash, the payer must receive a receipt and retain that receipt for 
future reference as evidence of the cash payment. Students or their representative should not 
send cash in the mail or pay cash to any person other than the University's Cashier. Students 
should ask for a receipt at the time of payment if one is not given. Personal checks are not 
accepted. 

Deferred Payment Plan 

Should parents or students desire to defer payment of a portion of the basic charges for tuition, 
fees, room and board, arrangements should be made directly with the Student Accounts Office. 
A deferment processing fee of $50.00 per plan will be charged for this privilege. 

Each student must satisfy all financial obligations to the University in accordance with the 
Deferred Payment Plan in order to (1) retain campus housing, (2) take midterm and final 
examinations, and (3) continue matriculation in the following semester. 

Exam Permits 

Students are required to present examination permits prior to taking midterm and final 
examinations. Exam permits are picked up at the Student Accounts Office. 

Special Stipulations 

A student is not considered registered until he/she has been cleared financially and his/her 
registration form has been stamped and signed by the Student Accounts Office. The release of 
transcripts diplomas and grades is prohibited if any unpaid balances are owed to the 
University. 

Students are expected to meet their payment obligations promptly and without notice from the 
Student Accounts Office. It is the student's personal responsibility to inform his/her parents, 
guardians, and sponsors of all financial obligations to the University and the due dates for 
payment. Students must also follow up with the Student Accounts Office on a regular basis to 
ensure that payments are received and credited to their accounts. 



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Florida Memorial University 

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Refund or Adjustment of Tuition, Fees, and Other Charges 

Tuition refunds are based on the total tuition charges and not on the amount paid. Board 
charges are refundable on a prorated basis to students who have properly withdrawn. Financial 
Aid programs which provide awards to students will be refunded in accordance with the 
formula required by local, state, or federal law. Balances due as a result of the refund are the 
responsibility of a student who withdraws. 

Fees paid for application, processing charges, mailbox rental, room charges, etc. are not 
refundable. No portion of a scholarship from Florida Memorial University is refundable. 

When a student is assigned a Florida Memorial University student network account, space is 
automatically allocated to the student on Florida Memorial University's central server for 
storage of personal data. A student may withdraw or cancel classes from Florida Memorial 
University within three (3) working days, pursuant to S.246.D.41 (1) (n) 3.e of the Florida 
statutes and receive a full refund with the exception of non-refundable charges. All refunds 
shall be made within thirty (30) days of the date that the University determines that the student 
has withdrawn. Tuition and general fees shall be refunded in full in any of the following 
circumstances: (1) courses canceled by the University; (2) involuntary call to active military 
duty; (3) documented death of the student; (4) exceptional circumstances, with the approval of 
the President of the University or his designee. 

Students must submit required official forms in order to withdraw from the university. The 
student will receive tuition and general fees refunds, less an administrative fee not to exceed 5% 
of the term's tuition at the following rates: 

Refund Schedule 

Tuition and general fees each Fall and Spring Semester 

If time of withdrawal from the University is made: Amount Refunded 



o/ * 

/o 

0/ * 



o/ * 



Before the end of the 5th day of classes 100% 

Between the 6th - 10th day of classes 80% 

Between the 11th - 15th day of classes 60% 

Between 16th - 20th day of classes 40% 

No refunds will be made after the 20th day of classes. 

Summer Session 

1st - 5th day of classes 100%* 

No refund will be made after the 5th day of summer classes 
*Less administrative cost 



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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Fees and room charges are not refundable. Board is prorated based on date of withdrawal. If a 
credit balance exists from overpayment or at the time of withdrawal, a refund for the balance 
will be processed within 30 days of the date that the University determines the student has 
withdrawn. Refund checks are distributed at the Bursar's Office. 

CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER 

The Career Development Center, located in the Student Services Building, Suite 114, is charged 
with assisting its students and alumni in becoming global leaders. The Career Center seeks to 
assist students with identifying their career needs and interests, gaining relevant work 
experience through co-ops and internships, as well as providing guidance in full-time 
professional job search. The Career Development Center also provides group and individual 
counseling, job readiness workshops, career assessment inventories, resume preparation and 
interviewing techniques, etiquette training and proper business decorum. 

Employer relations focuses on establishing and maintaining strong relationships with 
employers and assisting them in their recruiting needs. Career fairs, on-campus recruitment, 
and resume referrals are provided to assist organizations in meeting their staffing needs, goals, 
and objectives. 

Available Services 

• Walk-In Advising 

• Job Search Techniques 

• Career Advising & Assessment 

• Resume Referral Service 

• Mock Interviews 

• Internship Program 

• On-Campus Recruiting 

• Career Fair 

• Graduate School Expo 

• Black Executive Exchange Program 

• Career Seminars and Workshops 

• Service Learning 



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A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Florida Memorial University is administered by the Office of the Provost. The Academic 
programs are designed to broaden the intellectual experiences and abilities of students and, at 
the same time, recognize and provide for intellectual diversity as individual interests and goals 
are satisfied. Academic Affairs consists of the following academic schools and support units: 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Department of Aviation and Safety 

Department of Computer Sciences, Mathematics and Technology 

Department of Health and Natural Sciences 

Department of Humanities 

Department of Social Sciences 

Department of Visual and Performing Arts 
School of Business 

Graduate Program (Business) 
School of Education 

Graduate Programs (Education) 
Department of Freshman Studies 

Center for Advisement and Retention 

Testing Center 
Grants and Sponsored Research 
Honors Program 
Institutional Effectiveness 

Institutional Assessment 

Institutional Research 
Study Abroad Program 
University Library and Services 
University Registrar 

The Department of Freshman Studies does not offer degrees. The Schools offer majors in 
subject areas leading to the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees. The School of 
Education offers the Master of Science in Education degree and the School of Business offers the 
Master of Business Administration degree. 

Academic Programs are designed to broaden the intellectual experiences and abilities of 
students and, at the same time, recognize and provide for intellectual diversity as individual 
interests and goals are satisfied. 



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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Academic Regulations, Procedures, and Standards 

The academic year consists of two semesters, fall and spring, of approximately fifteen weeks 
each. The University also offers several summer sessions. Students enrolled in twelve to 
eighteen credit hours per semester are classified as full-time. Students wishing to take more 
than eighteen credit hours must obtain approval prior to registering from the School's Dean and 
the Provost. 

A reduced credit load is a maximum of twelve semester credit hours. Reduced loads are 
assigned to students in educational development programs, on academic probation, or involved 
in work activities that interfere with the student's academic progress. Part-time students are 
those who enroll in fewer than twelve semester credits. 

Degree Programs 

Thoughtful consideration should be given to the selection of a major. It is not necessary to 
declare a major during the freshman year. Careful selection of courses in the general interest 
area is recommended. Requirements for a major are set by each school. By the end of the 
sophomore year, students must officially declare a major. Transfer students with an associate 
degree must declare a major upon entering the University. When declaring a major, students 
must submit a formal application to the respective school dean. At this time, a faculty advisor 
will be assigned. Majors offered at Florida Memorial University are: 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Department of Aviation and Safety 

Airway Science (concentration in Airway Science Management) 

Aeronautical Science (concentration in Flight Education and concentration in Air Traffic 
Control) 
Department of Computer Science, Mathematics and Technology 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Science 

Management Information Systems 

Mathematics 
Department of Health & Natural Sciences 

Biology (and concentration in Radiobiology) 

Biology /Nursing (Dual Program with University of Miami and Florida International 

University) 

Chemistry (B.A. and B.S.) 

Chemistry (B.A. with concentration in Radiochemistry) 

Pre-Engineering (Dual Program with Florida International University) 

Environmental Studies 

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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Physics 
Department of Humanities 

Communications (concentration in Public Relations) 

Communications (concentration in Broadcast) 

English 

Religion and Philosophy 
Department of Interdisciplinary Studies 

Interdisciplinary Studies 
Department of Social Sciences 

Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice (concentration in Criminology) 

Criminal Justice (concentration in Pre-Laio) 

Political Science/Public Administration 

Psychology 

Social Work 

Sociology 
Department of Visual and Performing Arts 

Music (with concentrations in Church Music, Jazz Studies and B.A. in Music) 

School of Business 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Finance 

Hospitality Management (Dual Program with Florida International Univ.) 

Marketing 

Graduate Program 

Master of Business Administration (MBA) 

School of Education 

Elementary Education/ESOL 
Exceptional Student Education/ESOL 
Middle Grades 

General Science (5-9) 

English/ESOL (5-9) 

Mathematics (5-9) 

Music Education (K-12) 

Physical Education (K-12) 
Secondary Education 

Mathematics (6-12) 

Biology (6-12) 
Graduate Programs 

Masters of Science in Education (MSED) 

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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Computer Educational Technology 
Elementary Education 
Exceptional Student Education 
Reading 

A major consists of a minimum of 62 hours in an area; a minor consists of a minimum of 18 
hours. Minors are available in most areas where a major is offered, in addition to African- 
American Studies, economics, finance, history, and social work. Upon selection of a major, 
students are required to file a proposed program of courses with the school advisor and with 
the dean's approval. To change a major, students must 

1 . Obtain a Declaration/Change-of-Major form from their current school 

2. Obtain the signature of the appropriate school deans (previous and new) and 

3. Submit the form to the Office of the Registrar 

The change of major becomes effective on the date the change of major form is filed in the Office 
of the Registrar 

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

The purpose for credit by examination is to validate credits earned at other institutions or to 
exempt students from courses in which they have had related professional experience(s). 
Students who satisfy either one of the aforementioned criteria may earn a maximum of 15 
credits using this method. Credit by examination may not be used to correct registration errors. 
It cannot be used to satisfy course work for which the student has received a grade from Florida 
Memorial University. 

To apply for credit by examination, students must obtain an application from the Office of the 
Registrar and have the application approved by the dean of the specific school and the Provost 
prior to paying the examination fee. 

The dean and a committee of faculty will review the data submitted, interview the student, and 
determine if that student may take the examination. Examinations are prepared or selected by 
the school's faculty. Examinations will include a comprehensive coverage of course materials. 
Students may be required to complete written assignments as well as standardized short- 
answer and/or essay questions. Students may not apply for credit by examination during their 
expected term of graduation. 

A letter grade of "P" will be assigned upon successful completion of the examination. If 
unsuccessful, the grade of "F" will be assigned. 

Credits earned by credit by examination cannot be used to satisfy residency requirements, nor 
are these credits included in the calculation of the grade point average. Students who qualify for 

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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



credit by examination will have only one attempt to satisfy course requirements using this 
method. 

Academic Standing 

Good Academic Standing, Warning, Academic Progress, Probation, Suspension, Dismissal, 
Academic Appeal, and Readmission 

Good Academic Standing 

The required cumulative grade point average (GPA) for Good Academic standing and eligibility 
for graduation at Florida Memorial University is 2.0 for all programs except for the School of 
Education, which requires a cumulative GPA of 2.5 for graduation. 

Academic Warning (Freshman Only) 

Freshman who have attempted 0-29 credit hours and whose cumulative grade point average 
falls below 2.0 will be placed on Academic Warning for one semester. All students on Academic 
Warning must meet with their academic advisor. Students on Academic Warning can take a 
maximum of 12 credit hours. These students will not be allowed to complete their registration 
for the following semester without the academic advisor's signature on the Academic Referral 
Form. The advisor may require adjustment of the student's courses or course load. 

Academic Probation 

Students will be placed on Academic Probation when they fail to earn and maintain a 
cumulative GPA of 2.0. Students placed on Academic Probation must receive their advisor's 
approval to register for more than 12 credit hours. Students are removed from Academic 
Probation when their cumulative grade point average reaches a minimum of 2.0. 

Academic Suspension 

Students will be suspended from the University for one semester (Fall or Spring) if they fail to 
satisfy the aforementioned requirements. All suspended students must apply for re-admission 
to the Academic Standing Committee. 

Academic Appeal 

Students on Academic Suspension will be granted the right to appeal in writing. The Academic 
Standing Committee will make the final decision concerning suspension. If the suspension is 
rescinded, the student will be returned to Academic Probation status. 

Academic Dismissal 

Students returning from Academic Suspension who fail to achieve and maintain a cumulative 
GPA of 2.0 after two consecutive semesters of study will be dismissed from the University. 
Academic Dismissal carries a separation from Florida Memorial University for one (1) academic 
year before eligibility for re-admission may be restored. 



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Re-admission 

Students in good academic standing (2.00 cumulative GPA or above), who separate from the 
University for one or more years, are required to apply for re-admission to the Admissions 
Office. Students must satisfy the degree requirements for graduation stated in the University 
catalog for the academic year in which they are readmitted. A one semester separation from the 
University does not require a student in good standing to file for readmission. 

Students not in good academic standing (suspended or dismissed) who separate from the 
University for one of more years are required to apply for readmission in the Office of the 
Provost. 

Students on probation who withdraw from the University must submit a personal statement 
and two letters of recommendation to the Provost to be considered for re-admission. 

Transfer of Credits Policy 

Florida Memorial University accepts courses earned at other institutions provided that 

• The grade earned for these courses is a "C" or higher. 

• The courses represent collegiate coursework relevant to the degree program being 

pursued at the Institution. 

• The course content, level of instruction and resulting competencies are equivalent to those 

of students enrolled at the institution. 

• All Official University transcripts are submitted to the institution for evaluation prior to 
the transfer students' admission to the University. 

A maximum of 90 credits total may be transferred to Florida Memorial University. Furthermore, 
the number of credits awarded for a particular transfer course may not exceed the number of 
credits assigned to the equivalent course at the University. The school's dean and the Provost 
and Vice President for Academic Affairs must approve all transfer credits used toward a degree. 

Verification of content of transfer courses is made from University catalogs, course syllabi, and 
certified copies of military documents, and by following guidelines published by the American 
Council on Education or the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions 
Officers. 

Advanced Placement Program 

Florida Memorial University cooperates fully with accredited high schools and colleges in the 
Advanced Placement (AP) Program of the College Entrance Examine Board. AP courses are 
available to juniors and seniors in most United States high schools. 

• Students must earn a score of 3 or higher on the nationally administered exam. 

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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



• An official Grade Report must be submitted for credit 

• Credits will not be awarded for examination that duplicate course work or other exam 

credits previously posted to a student's academic record. 

• Students are awarded credits only; they are not given grades for Advanced Placement 

Courses, and Advanced Placement 

• Courses are not included in the GPA. 

• All AP credits granted will meet Florida Memorial University's degree requirements. 

• There are no additional fees involved for providing Advanced Placement services. 

Florida Memorial University Advance Placement (AP) Credit Course List 

Min. AP Sem. 



Exam Title 

History of Art 

Studio Art-Draw Portfolio 

Studio Art-General Port 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Computer Science A 
Computer Science AB 
Economics-Microeconomics 
Economics-Macroeconomics 
English-Lang & Comp 
English-Liter and Comp 
French Language 
French Literature 
Gov and Politics-Comp 
Gov and Politics-U.S. 
History-European 
History-United States 
Math-Calculus AB 
Math-Calculus BC 
Music Theory 
Physics B 

Physics C (Mechanics) 

Articulation Agreement 



Score Hrs 



Courses 



3 


3 


ART 101 


4 


3 


ART 131 


3 


3 


ART 121 


4 


6 


BIO 101, BIO 130 
BIO 131, BIO 206 


4 


5-10 


CHE 110, CHE 111 
CHE 112, CHE 113 


4 


3 


CSC 101 


4 


6 


CSC101,CSC232 


3 


3 


ECO 202 


3 


3 


ECO 201 


4 


6 


ENG101, ENG102 


4 


6 


ENG 101, ENG202 


3 


6 


FRE 201, FRE202 


3 


6 


FRE 305, FRE 306 


3 


3 


POL 311 


3 


3 


POL 301 


3 


3 


HIS 101 


3 


3 


HIS 200 


4 


3 


MAT 200 


4 


6 


MAT201, MAT202 


3 


6 


MUS 101, MUSI 02 


4 


s 


PHY200, PHY 201 
PHY 202, PHY 203 


4 


4P 


PHY 200, PHY 201 



Florida Memorial University cooperates fully with the community college system of Florida 
through an articulation agreement. Under this agreement, students who have completed an 
associate of arts degree (AA) from a regionally accredited community college in Florida will be 



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admitted lo Florida Memorial University as juniors, with the understanding that some 
prerequisite work may be required for the degree programs in which they enroll. 

Students with an associate of arts degree from other regionally accredited colleges outside the 
state of Florida will also be admitted as juniors with the same stipulations as described above. 

Credit for Life Experience Opportunity (CLEO) 

Credit for Life Experience Opportunity (CLEO) Program, off-campus sites, courses for 
individuals seeking professional education area certification or re-certification, non-credit 
courses, certificate programs, and continuing education units. Additionally, the department 
offers the Bachelor of Arts degree in Interdisciplinary Studies for working adults. 

Objectives of the Department 

Overall, the purpose of this department is to enrich, expand, and extend the university's 
primary mission of teaching and service: 

1. To maintain a curriculum that meets the needs of working adults 

2. To provide instruction and instruction to meet the needs of mature life-long learners 

3. To offer courses at Off-Campus sites to facilitate the continuing education efforts of working 
adults. 

4. To offer professional seminars, symposiums, and workshops 

5. To provide a forum for the enrichment of individuals through a lecture/artist series that 
encourages dialogue among local, county, state, and national communities 

6. To offer Continuing Education Units (CEU's) for non-credit activities that address identified 
needs of many unique audiences 

7. To offer Credit for Life Experiences Opportunity (CLEO) that are comparable and applicable 
to credit offered by the university 

8. To assist students in understanding the role of the Department of Continuing Education 

9. To provide students with information pertaining to the Interdisciplinary Studies degree 
program 

10. To prepare the students for graduate and professional school 

Mission Statement 

The Department of Continuing Education (DCE) serves to facilitate the University's degree- 
granting programs in the provision of educational opportunities and other experiential learning 
programs for traditional and non-traditional learners and serves as the catalyst for various 
interest groups in meeting professional and personal development needs. The department is 
responsible for the University's off campus centers; the Weekend Program; Credit for Life 
Experience Opportunity (CLEO) 



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Credit for Life Experience Opportunity (CLEO) Program 

The Credit for Life Experience Opportunity (CLEO) Program encompasses all adult experiential 
learning modes to obtain university credit for applicable practical learning. The College Level 
Examination Program (CLEP), portfolio development, National Program on Non-collegiate 
Instruction (PONSI), and credit-by-exam are used to determine credits. 

The purpose of the Credit for Life Experience Opportunity Program at Florida Memorial 
University is to provide a quality adult experiential learning program that offers the 
opportunity for successful completion of a baccalaureate degree. Further, using various learning 
tools that link practical experience to applicable university level learning, the mature learner 
maximizes the value of his/her professional experiences. 

In addition to meeting the CLEO program credit requirements, all students must complete a 
minimum of 30 credits through traditional classroom instruction at Florida Memorial University 
in order to be awarded the baccalaureate degree. 

The Interdisciplinary Studies degree program bridges the academic disciplines of business, the 
humanities, and the social sciences. 

To be eligible to apply to the CLEO Program, the student must 

• be a working adult 25 yrs. of age or older 

• have a minimum of five (5) years of professional experience (exceptions must be based 
on recommendation CLEO Portfolio Advisor) 

• complete the CLEO Application Packet 

• 

Attend a preliminary interview meeting with the CLEO Coordinator 



College Level Examination Program (CLEP) Policies 
General Information 

Florida Memorial University recognizes that a well-rounded education contributes to the 
quality of life. The University expects that students will leave its community of scholars and 
traditions prepared to participate fully in society. The University also recognizes and honors 
students' prior learning and may award credit for knowledge gained through independent 
study, advanced high school or honors classes, or other experiences outside of the University's 
classroom. CLEP tests measure the mastery of University-level introductory course content in a 
wide range of disciplines. 



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Credits Awarded 

Florida Memorial University will not award CLEP credits for the following: 

• Credit will not be awarded in a subject in which student has once been enrolled at the 
University level. 

• Credit cannot be earned through CLEP while on academic suspension from the 
University. 

• Credit will not be awarded for any course in which a student previously earned a failing 
grade. 

• Credit cannot be earned to raise a grade previously earned in a University course 

• Credit will not be awarded for exams taken without written approval from department 
chair and or an academic advisor. 

• Total number of credits by examination that a student may earn is twenty-four (24). 
Credits exceeding that amount will not be awarded. NO EXCEPTIONS. 

• Credit will not be awarded as part of the last 30 hours applicable to a degree. 

Score minimums, credit hours awarded, and course equivalencies awarded are subject to change 
for any examination without prior notice. 

Test Fee 

The fee for taking a test is $50 per test. A student may pay by check or money order made 
payable to CLEP, or by credit card (Visa, MasterCard, or American Express). There is also a $50 
institutional fee, which is due at the time 

Acceptable Scores and Credits 

Based on the American Council on Education's recommendation, Florida Memorial University 
will accept and award credits for the following CLEP courses: 

Examination Course Equivalent 

Analyzing & Interpreting Literature ENG 111 

English Composition with Essay ENG 101 

English Literature ENG 303 

English Literature II ENG 304 

French Language Level 1 (2 semesters) FRE 201 

French Language Level 2 (4 semesters) FRE 202 

Spanish Language Level 1 (2 semesters) SPA 201 

Spanish Language Level 2 (4 semesters) SPA 202 

American Government POL 301 

Hist, of the U.S. Early Colonization to 1877 HIS 321 

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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Hist, of the U.S. II 1865 to the Present HIS 324 

Human Growth and Development PSY 306 

Humanities DRA 200 

Principles of Macroeconomic ECO 201 

Principles of Microeconomic ECO 202 

Introductory Psychology PSY 200 

Social Science & History SSC 101 

Social Science II SSC 102 

Introductory Sociology SOC 200 

Biology BIO 101 

College Algebra MAT 1 1 1 

Intermediate Algebra MAT 110 

College Math II MAT 102 

Physical Science PSC 101 

Trigonometry MAT 113 

Principles of Accounting ACC211 

Introductory Bus Law BUS 311 

Information Systems & Comp Application CSC 101 

Principles of Marketing MAR 301 

Principles of Management BUS 211 

Registration 

For further information, please contact the Testing Center located in the Sarah Blocker Hall 
Building, room 211-212 at (305) 626-3775. 

Transfer Credits from International Institutions 

Postsecondary credits earned by international students at colleges and universities which 
pattern themselves after the British or other non-American education systems must be 
evaluated by an external transcript evaluation organization approved by Florida Memorial 
University. 

Graduation Requirements 

Advisors and faculty will advise students toward meeting requirements for graduation; 
students have the ultimate responsibility of fulfilling requirements for graduation. Students are 
responsible for filing an application for a degree in the Office of the Registrar the semester prior 
to graduation. All Graduation Fees are due upon applying for graduation. Following are the 
basic requirements for graduation: 



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1. Students must satisfy the curriculum requirements, complete a minimum of 120 credit 
hours, and meet the curriculum requirements for graduation specified by their degree 
program; 

2. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or (2.5, for education and pre- 
hospitality management graduates) 

3. Completion of a minimum of twenty-five percent (25%) of the total number of credits 
required for the degree at Florida Memorial University 

4. Completion of a senior thesis or project for non-education majors 

5. Fulfillment of all financial obligations and procedural requirements. 

6. All requirements for graduation must be satisfied at least 24 hours after the last day of 
final examinations. Students who fail to complete requirements are required to file a 
new graduation application. (See Academic Calendar for deadlines.) Only those 
students who have completed all requirements for graduation will be permitted to 
participate in commencement exercises. 

Second Baccalaureate Degree 

A second bachelor's degree may be awarded when: 

1. Requirements of an appropriate academic school for a second degree have been met. 

2. The student has completed a minimum of 30 credit hours at Florida Memorial 
University. 

3. Requirements for graduation from the University have been met. A bachelor's degree 
has been earned from an accredited four year college or university and 30 additional 
credit hours of course work are completed at Florida Memorial University. All 
requirements of the major school must be met. 

Dual Majors 

A student who desires to have dual majors must simultaneously meet the demands of both 
majors. Requirements for each major must be successfully satisfied. Transcripts will indicate the 
completion of dual majors; however, one degree will be awarded. 

ATTENDANCE POLICY 

Students are expected to attend all classes for which they are registered and are not authorized 
to attend classes for which they are not registered. Absences during the first two weeks of 
classes are especially discouraged as professors are required to report to the Registrar's office 
the students who are registered in their courses but have not attended. The Registrar's office 
will proceed to drop these students from the reported courses; however, it is the students' 
ultimate responsibility to drop or withdraw from the courses they no longer plan to attend. 
Students are permitted one unexcused absence per credit hour of day courses. Students are 
permitted two unexcused absences for courses offered during the evening. Students exceeding 

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the number of unexcused absences will be in jeopardy of failing the course and may be 
withdrawn from the class by the instructor. Calculation of absences begins from the first class 
meeting for students whose names appear on the initial class roster. Acceptable absences 
include illness, serious family emergencies, special curricular requirements (e.g., University 
fairs, field trips and approved meetings), military obligations, and participation in official 
University-sponsored activities, such as music performances and athletic competitions if the 
students are in good academic standing. If accompanied by a letter from the Vice President for 
Student Affairs, absences from class for court-imposed legal obligations (e.g., jury duty or 
subpoena) will be excused. Participation in University-sponsored activities is excused if the 
students are in good academic standing. Students are responsible for any and all class work and 
may not use University-sponsored activities as a plea for extension of time to complete 
assignments, or for permission to take makeup examinations or quizzes, or to excuse missed 
exams/coursework. 

GRADING SYSTEM AND QUALITY POINTS 



Grades 


Grade Quality Points 


A 


4.00 


A- 


3.70 


IU 


3.30 


B 


3.00 


B- 


2.70 


C+ 


2.30 


c 


2.00 


c- 


1.70 


D+ 


1.30 


D 


1.00 


1 


0.00 


W 


Official Withdrawal from the University 


WP 


Withdraw passing 


WF 


Withdraw failing 


I 


Incomplete 


P 


Passed 


u 


Unsatisfactory* 


AU 


Audit 


NC 


No credit 



^Developmental Courses 

Students must complete reading, English, mathematics, and all major required courses with a 
minimum grade of "C" The "C-" grade is not a passing grade in the aforementioned courses. 
Students who are failing a general education course at midterm must pre-register to repeat that 

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course during the next scheduled offering. All repeated courses must be taken at Florida 
Memorial University. 

Students may be given an "I" only if a small part of the course is missed because of unavoidable 
circumstances and there is a reasonable chance of obtaining a "C" or better if the students 
complete the missing work. Students must complete this work within the established period of 
time (see Academic Calendar) without further registration or class attendance. Failure to adhere to 
this policy within one semester after receiving a grade of incomplete will result in the grade of 
"I" converting to the grade of "F." Students who have filed for graduation may not receive an 
"1" during the term in which they plan to graduate. If a grade of "I" is received, the student 
must reapply for graduation at the next scheduled application period. 

Grade Reports 

Students may review their grades via the University's website. A password is necessary to 
access this program. The report will also reflect the term grade point average and a cumulative 
grade point average. Grade reports are unofficial records. The University reserves the right to 
withhold the grade reports of students with financial obligations. 

Grade Appeal 

Students may appeal a grade in a course if it is demonstrated that a faculty member has made a 
capricious or prejudicial evaluation in grading. To resolve grade grievances, students must 
adhere to the following procedures: 

1. Discuss the problem with the instructor with whom they have the grievance 

2. Meet with the school dean if the problem cannot be resolved with the instructor 

3. File a written grade appeal with the Grade Dispute Committee if the school dean cannot 

resolve the problem. 

A written grade appeal must be appropriately filed in the semester following the one in which 
the disputed grade was given. 

Change of Grades 

Final grades can be changed only in instances of documented error. Grade changes must be 
reported by the professor on the Change of Grade Form. The form must be signed by the 
instructor and submitted with the appropriate documentation to the dean who in turn will 
submit it the Provost and Vice President. Upon approval, the form is forwarded to the Office of 
the Registrar where the grade change is recorded. Upon request, a student whose grade is 
changed will receive a student copy of the transcript reflecting the grade change. A grade may 
not be changed after two (2) semesters have elapsed, unless a written appeal by the student has 
been upheld, after the aforementioned time period. 



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ACADEMIC HONORS 

Honors at Graduation 

The following honors are awarded at graduation to students who have maintained high 
scholarship. 

Cum Laude- cumulative grade point average of 3.20 to 3.49. 

Magna Cum Laude- cumulative grade point average of 3.50 to 3.79. 
Summa Cum Laude- cumulative grade point average of 3.80 or higher. 

Other Academic Honors 

Tlie President's List- Full-time students who have earned a semester 
grade point average of 4.0 (with a minimum of 
12 semester hours and above) 

The Dean's List- Full-time students who have earned a semester 

grade point average of 3.5 to 3.99 (with a minimum 
of 12 semester hours and above) 

The Honor Roll- Full-time students who have maintained a semester 

grade point average of 3.0 to 3.49 (with a 
minimum of 12 semester hours and above) 

Students enrolled in fewer than 12 semester hours of coursework, who have incomplete grades 
or pending grade changes, will not be considered for academic honors for that semester. 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

Alpha ETA Rho - is an international professional college aviation fraternity (open to male and 
female students) that serves as a contact between the aviation industry and educational 
institutions to foster, promote, and mentor today's college students towards successful careers 
in any aviation field. Established in 1929, membership is open to aviation-related majors who 
maintain a GPA of at least 3.0. 

Alpha Kappa Mu - Alpha Kappa Mu National Honor Society is a general scholarship honor 
organization that is open to junior and senior men and women in all academic areas. The society 
was founded at Tennessee A & I State University in Nashville on November 26, 1937. 
Alpha Phi Chapter of Alpha Kappa Mu at Florida Memorial University is open to all juniors and 
seniors with a GPA of 3.3 or better. The purpose of the Society is to promote high scholarship, to 

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encourage sincere and zealous endeavor in all fields of knowledge and service, to cultivate a 
high order of personal living, and to develop an appreciation for scholarly work. 

Sigma Fan Delta - Sigma Tau Delta is an International English Honor Society. Sigma Tau 
Delta's central purpose is to confer distinction upon students of the English language and 
literature in undergraduate, graduate, and professional studies. Sigma Tau Delta also 
recognizes the accomplishments of professional writers who have contributed to the fields of 
language and literature. One of the largest members of the Association of College Honor 
Societies, Sigma Tau Delta has over 600 active chapters, more than 900 faculty sponsors, and 
inducts approximately 7,000 members annually. Members have the opportunity to be 
recognized for their outstanding achievements, enrich their education, receive help making 
career choices, and advance their careers. 

Kappa Delta Pi - Kappa Delta Pi is an International Honor Society dedicated to scholarship and 
excellence. The Society was founded March 8, 1911. Florida Memorial University received its 
Charter April 23, 1995. The Society subscribes to four ideals: Fidelity to Humanity, Science, 
Service and Toil. Invitation to membership in the FMU Phi Eta Chapter is extended to 
undergraduates who have obtained or earned an overall grade point average of 3.0 or above 
and to faculty and University administrators. 

Delta Mu Delta - Delta Mu Delta National Honor Society in Business Administration is to 
promote higher scholarship in training for business and to recognize and reward scholastic 
attainment in business subjects. Membership in Delta Mu Delta should be the goal of every 
student in the School of Business. To be eligible for membership, the academic ranking of those 
being considered must place them in the upper 20 percent of the junior and senior level classes. 

Psi Chi- Psi Chi National Honor Society in Psychology was founded in 1929 for the purposes of 
encouraging, stimulating, and maintaining excellence in scholarship, and advancing the science 
of psychology. Membership is open to graduate and undergraduate men and women who are 
making the study of psychology one of their major interests and who meet the minimum 
qualifications. Psi Chi is a member of the Association of University Honor Societies (ACHS) and 
is an affiliate of the American Psychological Association (APA) and the American Psychological 
Society (APS). Psi Chi functions as a federation of chapters located at more than 975 senior 
colleges and universities in the USA. The national office is located in Chattanooga, Tennessee. 

Upsilon Pi Epsilon-An International Honor Society for the Computing and Information 
Disciplines. The mission of UPE is to recognize academic excellence at both the undergraduate 
and graduate levels in the Computing and Information Disciplines. UPE is a member of the 
Association of College Honor Societies (ACHS). 



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REGISTRATION 

Students must comply with student load requirements as explained in the Academic 
Regulations section of this catalog. 

Dates for early registration, registration, and late registration for fall, spring, and summer 
semesters are published in the University Academic Calendar. Students are required to register 
in accordance with this schedule. 

Schedules of classes are available on the university's web site (www.fmuniv.edu). Students are 
urged to study schedules carefully and, in conjunction with their advisors, plan courses of study 
on the official registration worksheet form. This form is available in the academic advisors' 
offices. 

Students currently enrolled will be charged a late registration fee if not registered early. 
Students have not completed registration until cleared by the University's Business Office. 
Registration will be canceled if not completed by the established deadline. 

Students will not be permitted to enroll after the late registration period. 

Course Cancellation 

Course(s) may be canceled by school deans in the event of insufficient enrollment or lack of an 
instructor. 

Add, Drop and Withdrawals 

Courses may be added during the designated add period at the beginning of each semester. 
Students may neither register for nor add courses after this period. Courses may be dropped 
through the second week of the semester. (See appropriate date on the academic calendar.) 
Students may not drop a course after this period but may only withdraw from the course or the 
University. Dropped courses are not reflected on the student's transcripts. 

Withdrawal from Courses 

At the end of the drop period, students may withdraw from one or more courses during the 
withdrawal period indicated on the academic calendar. "WP" (Withdraw - Passing) or "WF" 
(Withdraw - Failing) will be given to reflect academic progress at the time of withdrawal. 



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Withdrawal from the University 

Students may withdraw from the University as late as one week before the last week of classes. 
After this time, official documentation should support an emergency beyond the control of the 
student. An official withdrawal form must be executed during the term for which the student 
wishes to withdraw from the University. Students who wish to withdraw from the University 
should contact the Office of the Registrar for procedural information. The effective date of the 
withdrawal is the student's last date of attendance according to faculty records. Failure to 
adhere to these procedures will result in a grade of "F" in all courses in which the student is 
registered. 

A student who leaves the University without official notification due to extraordinary 
circumstances beyond the student's control and receives failing grades may submit a written 
request for an academic retroactive withdrawal no later than one semester after the receipt of 
final term grades. Relevant documentation and a letter of explanation must be submitted to the 
Registrar's Office. The withdrawal effective date will be the last day of classes of the term in 
question, according to the University's Academic Calendar. 

Students can also be administratively withdrawn from the University at any time by the 
Registrar upon recommendation by the Vice President for Student Affairs, Provost and 
Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, or the President. Such withdrawals may be 
made for disciplinary reasons, or when students fail to meet financial obligations or academic 
regulations. 

Students whose enrollment at Florida Memorial University is interrupted for more than one 
semester are required to submit applications for re-admission. The applications must be sent to 
the Office of Admissions. Students placed on academic suspension must remain in that status 
for one semester (fall or spring) before being considered for readmission. Students who 
voluntarily withdraw from the University for one or more academic years are required to apply 
for re-admission. Degree requirements stated in the University Academic Catalog for the 
academic year a student is readmitted must be satisfied. 

Auditing a Course 

Students may register to audit courses with the written approval of the instructor and the dean 
of the major school. Credit will not be granted for audited courses. Students are not required to 
prepare written assignments or to take examinations. A per credit hour fee for each course 
audited is assessed according to the current fee schedule. 



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Concurrent Enrollment at another University 

Students may be allowed, in extenuating circumstances, to enroll in another regionally 
accredited institution for specified courses. Approval of the school dean and Provost and Vice 
President for Academic Affairs is necessary. Failure to obtain approval will cause denial of 
credit. Further, students seeking concurrent enrollment are limited to the conditions of Florida 
Memorial University student credit load and grade requirement policies. 

Transient Permit 

Florida Memorial University - Students who enroll at other institutions with the intention of 
using credits earned toward graduation from Florida Memorial University must receive prior 
permission from the school dean and the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. 
Students must complete a Transient Permit Form available from the Office of the Registrar. 

Students may take courses only at other regionally accredited institutions. Only grades of "C" 
or better can be applied to Florida Memorial University transcripts. 

Other Institutions - Students from other institutions who enroll at Florida Memorial University 
should present approval from the home institution prior to registering for courses. 

Classification of Students 

Florida Memorial University classifies students by level and special status according to the 
number of hours completed. 

Classifications by level are as follows: Freshman - to 29 semester hours 

Sophomore - 30 to 59 semester hours 

Junior - 60 to 89 semester hours 

Senior - more than 89 semester hours 

Students who are not enrolled in degree programs are classified as non-degree seeking students. 

ACADEMIC HONOR CODE 

Florida Memorial University recognizes honesty and integrity as necessary to the academic 
purpose and function of the institution. The University, therefore, expects a high standard of 
individual honor in all academic endeavors from each student. 

Academic dishonesty includes cheating, plagiarism, forgery, collusion, and credential 
misrepresentation. Students found guilty of academic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary 
action, including loss of credit, suspension, or immediate dismissal from the University. 

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Cheating - The use or attempt to use unauthorized materials, information, study aids, or 
computer-related information. This includes giving or receiving, offering or soliciting 
information on tests or written assignments, and/or vising notes or books other than those 
explicitly permitted by the instructor during an examination. 

Plagiarism - Representation of words, data, works, ideas, computer programs, or anything not 
generated in an authorized fashion properly cited as one's own. 

Forgery - Willful misrepresentation or altering of documents with intent to defraud. It is a crime 
punishable by law. Its most common occurrence among students includes, but is not limited to, 
the misrepresentation of signatures (especially that of an academic advisor) on official 
documents of the University or the attempt to cash checks that are not lawfully their own. 

Collusion - Cooperation of student(s) with staff personnel in securing confidential 
information/material (tests, examinations, etc.); bribery by student(s) or staff personnel to 
change examination grades and or grade point average(s); cooperative efforts by students and 
student assistant(s) in gaining access to examinations or answers to examinations for 
distribution; and resubmission of term papers and/or reports that have been submitted 
previously and graded, but have been secured and re-circulated among students. 

Credential Misrepresentation - Use of untrue written statements regarding matters of fact in 
order to gain admission to or employment at Florida Memorial University. This also includes 
misstatements of fact, distribution of false printed material, and conduct manifestly intended to 
deceive or mislead. 

STUDENT RECORDS 

Florida Memorial University does not release student record information, except as permitted 
under the Buckley-Pell Amendment to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 
(FERPA). 

Student records are confidential, and information which can identify a student will not be 
released to a third party unless authorized by the student. A record of all authorizations will be 
kept in the student's file. Students may request, in writing, access to personal official records 
and may challenge the accuracy of records maintained by the University. The Office of the 
Registrar will respond to any request within ten working days. 

Requests for official or unofficial Florida Memorial University transcripts are made in person to 
the Office of the Registrar or by the U.S. mail. Telephone requests will not be honored. Third 
party requests must include a signed release authorization from the student. 

The following information is necessary to process a transcript: 

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• Student name 

• Student identification number or Social Security number 

• Date of birth 

• Dates of attendance 

• Degree(s) obtained (if any) 

The request must be signed and dated by the student the full address of the person or 
institution receiving the transcript. A $3.00 fee is required, in cash or money order for 
each copy of the transcript. 

Transcript requests should be addressed to: 

Registrar's Office 
Florida Memorial University 
15800 NW 42nd Ave. 
Miami Gardens, FL 33054 

Students negotiating with co-op employers who require grades should request a transcript in 
the usual manner and allow the usual time. 

Rights Granted To Students Under The Buckley-Pell Amendment To The Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act Of 1974 (FERPA-Public Law 93-380) 

To comply with the Buckley-Pell Amendment to the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act 
of 1974, commonly called the Buckley Amendment, the administration of Florida Memorial 
University informs the students of their rights under this act. The law affords students rights of 
access to educational records and protects students from the release and disclosure of those 
records to third parties. Educational records are those records, files, and other materials that 
contain information directly related to a student's academic progress, financial status, medical 
condition, etc., and are maintained by the university or a party acting on behalf of the 
university. 

Educational Records 

Educational records are defined as those records created to assist the offices of academic 
divisions, admission, business, evening degree program, financial aid, president, provost, 
registrar, student affairs and institutional research in their support of basic institutional 
objectives and any records identified by student name that contain personally identifiable 
information in any medium. Educational records, with the exception of those designated as 
directory information (described below), may not be released without the written consent of the 
student to any individual, agency, or organization other than the following authorized 
personnel or situations: 

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1. Parents, if student is a dependent as defined by Section 152 of the Internal Revenue 
Code of 1954. 

2. Florida Memorial University faculty and staff who have an educational interest in the 
student. 

3. Officials of other schools in which the student seeks to enroll (transcripts). 

4. Certain government agencies specified in legislation. 

5. An accrediting agency in carrying out its function. 

6. In emergency situations where the health or safety of the student or others is involved. 

7. Educational surveys where individual identification is withheld. 

8. In response to a judicial order. 

9. In a campus directory after the student has deletion options. 

10. In connection with financial aid. 

Student may request, in writing, an opportunity to review their official educational records 
maintained by the university. Educational records excluded from student access are: 

1. Confidential letters and statements of recommendation which were placed in the record 
before January 1, 1975. 

2. Medical and psychological information. 

3. Private notes and procedural matters retained by the maker or substitutes. 

4. Financial records of parents or guardian. 

Students may challenge any data in their educational record that is considered to be inaccurate 
or misleading. Student must submit the challenge in writing as stated below. For more 
information about educational records maintained by the university, students should contact 
the registrar. 

Directory Information 

The university may release directory information to parties having a legitimate interest in the 
information. Directory information consists of the following: student name, address, telephone 
listing, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized 
activities and sports, weight and height of athletes, date of attendance, degrees and awards 
received and most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the student. 
Mailing lists of Florida Memorial University students will not be provided outside the 
university community except to the U.S. Department of Defense for military recruiting purposes 
as required by the Solomon Amendment. Students who wish to exercise their rights under the 
law to refuse to permit release of any or all of the categories of personally identifiable 
information with respect to themselves must notify the registrar in writing, preferably before 
completion of registration for the first term of enrollment for that academic year. 



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Student Review of Records 

To review his or her student records, a student must submit a written request to the registrar. 
Request forms for such a hearing and information about the procedures to be followed are 
available in the registrar's office. Access will be made available within 45 days of receipt of the 
written request. Certified transcripts may be withheld if a student has not met all obligations to 
the university. After inspection of a record, the student has the right to challenge any material 
which may be inaccurate or misleading or which violates the student's privacy. The student 
may do so by requesting the correction or deletion of such information in writing on the above 
listed form. This appeal may be handled in a formal meeting with the party or parties 
concerned or through a formal hearing procedure. Formal hearing procedures are as follows: 

a) The hearing shall be conducted and decided within a reasonable period of time 
following the request for a hearing. 

b) The hearing shall be conducted and the decision rendered by an institutional official or 
other party who does not have a direct interest in the outcome of the hearing. 

c) The student shall be offered a full and fair opportunity to present evidence relevant to 
the issues raised. 

d) The decision shall be rendered in writing within a reasonable period of time after the 
conclusion of the hearing. 

Note: A hearing may not be convened to contest grades. The grade appeal procedures are 
listed in the Grade Appeal policy of the catalog. 

Student's Written Consent to Release Educational Records 

Written consent by the student to release educational records to a third party must specify the 
records to be released and the recipient of such records. Request forms for the release of 
appropriate records are available in each office containing educational records. 

Notification of Parents 

Parents may obtain non-directory information (grades, GPA, etc.) only at the discretion of the 
institution and after it has determined that the child is legally their dependent. Florida 
Memorial University recognizes the importance of support and interest of parent and families of 
students in all areas of the college program. Students are encouraged to share information about 
their experience and programs with their families. In keeping with the philosophy, it is not 
Florida Memorial University's policy to disclose non-directory information based solely on 
dependent status. Parents may also acquire non-directory information by obtaining and 
presenting a signed consent from their child. 



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Further information relating to the Buckley-Pell Amendment to the Family Education Rights 
and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) may be obtained by contacting the Registrar, Florida 
Memorial University, 15800 NW 42 nd Avenue, Miami Gardens, Florida 33054. 

VETERANS AFFAIRS 

Florida Memorial University maintains a Veterans Affairs Office in the Office of the Registrar to 
assist veterans and dependents of veterans who are entitled to V.A. educational benefits under 
Chapter 30, 32, or Chapter 35 of Title 38, U.S. Code and Chapter 106, Title 10, USC. 

Standards of Progress Policy for Veterans 

Students are considered to be in good academic standing when their cumulative grade point 
average is a minimum of a 2.0. Florida Memorial University's policies on academic warning, 
probation and suspension are based on the potentiality that students can overcome academic 
difficulty and make appropriate progress toward a degree. 

Academic Warning (Freshmen Only) (See page 43) 

Academic Progress (See page 43) 

Academic Probation (See page 43) 

Academic Suspension (See page 43) 

Academic Appeal (See page 43) 

Academic Dismissal (See page 43) 

Re-admission (See page 44) 

Termination of Veterans Benefits - A student receiving Veterans Educational Benefits who is 
placed on academic warning must regain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or better at 
the end of the semester following the notification. If, at the end of this semester, the cumulative 
grade point average is below 2.0, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs will be notified 
concerning termination of the student's veterans educational benefits. 

CENTER FOR URBAN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 

The Center for Urban Environmental Studies provides educational and research opportunities 
to faculty and students and outreach to communities on environmental issues with emphasis on 
South Florida. The Center has six components: 

• Bachelor of Science in Environmental Studies 

• Minors in Ecology and Environmental Studies 

• Community Environmental Education, Awareness, and Outreach 

• Faculty Development 

• Campus Environmental Awareness and Student Internships, and 

• Environmental Research 



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Interested faculty may apply to become Center Associates by contacting the Director or the 
Associate Director. Students who are interested in majoring in Environmental Studies or in 
participating in environmental internship experiences should also contact the Director. The 
Center and its Geographical Information System (GIS) Lab are located in LEH 206. 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY AND SERVICES 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The mission of the Nathan W. Collier Library is to provide resources and instructional materials 
in support of the transmission and exchange of scholarly information. The library evaluates its 
programs, collections, technology, service delivery, and other activities on a regular basis, in 
order to meet the challenges of a changing technological and global society. The library seeks to 
be both an educational resource center for the university community, and a learning 
organization that constantly works to maximize its effectiveness in accomplishing its mission. 

Grants and sponsored research 

The Office of Grants and Sponsored Research assists the faculty and staff in identifying grant 
and research funding opportunities, in writing and developing grant proposals, and in 
monitoring grants management activities. 

Its goal is to advance the mission of the University through the use of external funds received 
from grant and contract awards. To this end, the office endeavors to encourage and support 
grant writing, grants management and sponsored research activities as these processes enhance 
teaching and learning, support institutional growth, promote faculty development and provide 
service to the community (see the Office of Grants and Sponsored Research for a copy of the 
Proposal Writing and Grant Development Guide). 

Grant and contract funds received by the University are managed in accordance with 
restrictions imposed by the external funding agency or organization and in accordance with 
standard and generally accepted accounting principles and federal regulations. This office 
assists with the implementation of grants and contracts, with the monitoring of program 
expenditures, and with grant reporting and closeout requirements. 

The Office of Institutional Effectiveness 

The Office of Institutional Effectiveness is responsible for the collecting, recording, 
disseminating and reporting vital data related to all aspects of the University. The key 
functional areas of this Office are Institutional Research, Strategic Planning, and Assessment. 
Additionally, the Office of Institutional Effectiveness is responsible for the oversight of all 
University Accreditations (Regional, Departmental, and Programmatic). This Office also 
conducts Program Reviews, Faculty/Staff Workshops, and the coordination of the meetings for 

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the purpose of reviewing, developing or enhancing the University's Strategic Plan. The Office 
also serves as a clearinghouse for appropriate University statistics. 

The Office of institutional Effectiveness operates under the auspices of the Provost and Vice 
President for Academic Affairs and is managed by the Associate Vice President for Institutional 
Effectiveness. 

This Office serves to contextualize data and inform institutional decision making related to 
budgeting, resource allocation, annual planning, implementation of action plans, and 
assessment schedules. This Office aims to achieve this by maintaining objectivity, while 
appropriately assessing, analyzing, interpreting, and sustaining the integrity of the University's 
data. 

The Office of Institutional Research is responsible for the collection, analysis, and reporting of 
official information about the University, its students, and faculty. This includes reporting the 
United States Department of Education's Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System 
(IPEDS) annual surveys, The University Fund/UNCF's Annual Survey, and the Independent 
Colleges and Universities of Florida's Accountability Report. It assists other offices in the 
construction, administration, and analysis of surveys and reports. It also prints, distributes, 
analyzes, and reports the Course and Instructor evaluation survey during the fall and spring 
semesters. The Office is staffed by a Director, a staff assistant, and several student assistants. 

The Mission of the Assessment Office is to assist the campus community in developing and 
maintaining a quality assessment program for the institution that is based on student learning 
outcomes and assessment of administrative support of the University's Mission. The 
Assessment Director is dedicated to supporting Florida Memorial University's commitment to 
academic excellence. 

Pre-College/Development Courses 

Students who on the basis of test scores administered by Florida Memorial University exhibit 
deficiencies in English, reading, or mathematics will be required to take appropriate courses 
prior to enrolling in courses in the Core Curriculum. Students will receive letter grades for these 
courses. Developmental courses will not be counted as part of credit hours required for 
graduation. Developmental courses become a part of the student's permanent academic record. 
Additional information pertaining to these courses is found in the Freshman Studies section of 
the catalog. 



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FRESHMAN STUDIES 

The principal mission of the Freshman Studies Department is to provide freshmen with the 
skills and support necessary to become successful in their chosen field of study and to 
implement a comprehensive program for their retention. To this end, Freshman Studies offers 
and instructs students in a college success and study skills seminar and oversees and monitors 
the progress of the students. Freshman Studies also provides instruction for students in 
developmental English, mathematics, and reading courses. 

The Department serves as the initial point of entry for all first-year students and for undeclared 
transfer students who have earned less than 60 credit hours. Additional academic services 
provided by the Department include academic advising, degree plan development, skill 
enhancement and reinforcement, tutorial services and thematic workshops for student 
development. In its institutional role, the Freshman Studies Department: 

• provides academic advisement for students during their tenure as freshmen; 

• provides comprehensive support for retention; 

• orients new students to the University; 

• instructs students in preparatory level English, reading, and mathematics; 

• offers a college and life success seminar (FMU 101 University 101); 

• provides supplemental instruction through academic skills laboratories; 

• oversees and monitors the academic progress of students; and 

• certifies student for major department transitioning. 

Entrance Requirements 

Most new students are required to take the Accuplacer Computerized Placement Test (CPT) or 
an equivalent standardized placement examination prior to registering for classes. The CPT 
measures achievement levels in reading, English, and mathematics. Based on the results of the 
test, students are assigned appropriate college-level courses, pre-college level preparatory 
courses or both. New, non-transfer, students are not required to take a placement test if they 
have the minimum scores and/or grades listed on either of the tests below: 

• ACT 19 (Composite) 

• SAT Math (Quantitative) 440 

• SAT Verbal or Writing 420 

International students with passing grades (or scores I-V) in Ordinary Level (O Level) and GCE 
Advance Level (A Level - now known as CAPE) are also exempt from taking the placement test. 
Transfer students who have declared a major (and are not required to take pre- 
college/developmental studies courses in English, mathematics, and reading) are referred 
immediately to the degree-granting school of choice for advisement. 



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Progression Standards 

Students must pass each course in any sequence of reading, English, or mathematics courses 
with a grade of "C" or better. Students who earn midterm grades of "C-" "D", "D+" or "F" in 
any reading, English, or mathematics course(s) must pre-register for that same course(s) before 
advancing to the next course in the sequence. Grades of "C-", "D", "D+" and "F" are not passing 
grades, and the class must be repeated immediately before enrolling in the next level of the 
course. The grade of "C-"is considered passing in FMU 101 -University 101. 

Mathematics Resource Center 

The Mathematics Resource Center is a supplemental learning assistance facility in the Freshman 
Studies Department. The Mathematics Resource Center provides a supportive environment 
where students can work to enhance academic performance on concepts explored in class. The 
Mathematics Resource Center services include tutoring, remediation, reinforcing, enriching, and 
classroom work. Priority is given to students who must complete required laboratory hours in 
conjunction with their courses although other students seeking assistance are served. The 
essential assistance strategy is one-on-one and small group tutoring with subject area 
professionals and peer tutors. Thematic workshops related to— mathematical concepts are 
organized to address a limited range of academic concerns. In addition, tutors work with study 
groups to review for midterm and final examinations. 

Academic Skills Laboratory 

The computerized Academic Skills Laboratory provides students an opportunity to reinforce 
classroom instruction and to eliminate specific academic deficiencies through the use of 
computer software programs. The Skills Lab is vised by students primarily to strengthen skills in 
all areas. Students may also develop skills in the use of computers (especially word processing). 
The laboratory coordinator and staff assist, monitor, and supervise students who are referred to 
the laboratory by instructors. 

Writing Center 

The Writing Center is a complimentary laboratory component of the Freshman Studies 
Department designed to assist students in developing, improving, and enhancing their writing 
skills. Students are aided in acquiring the necessary skills to write effectively through 
individualized tutoring and computer-assisted instruction. Portfolios are maintained by the 
Center's personnel for students and instructors to monitor students' progress. 

Center for Advisement and Retention (CAR) 

The mission of the Center for Advisement and Retention (CAR) is to coordinate the institutional 
advising system and provide academic support services which promote academic success and 

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student progress toward graduation. The CFAA provides developmental, educational and 
academic skills workshops and serves as a resource for Florida Memorial University faculty, 
staff and students for issues related to academic advising. 

Academic Advisement in Freshman Studies 

The Freshman Studies Department is responsible for the initial academic advisement and course 
scheduling of all new students and the on-going continuous advisement for freshmen and 
undeclared majors. These processes occur in the Center for Advisement and Retention within 
the department. The academic advising program is designed to provide students with 
guidelines necessary to progress through college-level credit courses and chart appropriate 
initial courses of study and assist students in determining where they may be best suited in 
exploring major career options. The advising process begins prior to new student orientation 
and continues throughout the students' tenure in the department. Components of the advising 
process are workshops and seminars, the college catalog, degree plans, check sheets, 
transcripts/academic history, related test scores, transfer credits, and the assigned advisor. 
Students should confer with an advisor regularly. However, advising errors do not exempt 
students from the responsibility of meeting all degree requirements for graduation. 

Pre-College/Developmental Studies Program 

The goal of the Pre-College/Developmental Studies Program is to strengthen academically 
under-prepared students in English, mathematics, and reading through intensive instruction 
and tutorial assistance. As a consequence, students' skills are improved and brought to college- 
level in the related areas. These courses are required for all freshmen and some transfer students 
whose college placement test results fall below the minimum requirement for enrolling in 
required courses in the core/general education curriculum. All Pre-College/Developmental 
Studies Program courses include laboratory assignments in addition to regular classroom 
assignments and participation. Students must successfully complete pre-college/developmental 
courses within three (3) grading periods. Pre-College/Developmental Studies Program courses 
require a minimum grade of "C" for passing. Because of the preparatory nature of the 
program, credits earned in pre-college developmental courses do not count toward minimum 
graduation requirements. Students may use credits earned in these courses to qualify for 
financial aid, however. Additionally, grades and credits earned in these courses continue to be 
included in the GPA and are not deleted from the calculation until all other degree 
requirements have been met. 

Pre-College/Development Studies Program Curriculum 

DSE 099 Essentials of College English 3 

DSM 099 Essentials of College Math 3 

DSR 099 Essentials of College Reading 3 



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Pre-College Developmental Studies Program Guidelines 

1. Students testing into DSE 099 may not enroll concurrently in writing intensive courses. 

2. Students testing into DSM 099 may not enroll concurrently in computation intensive courses. 

3. Students testing into DSR 099 may not enroll concurrently in reading intensive courses. 

4. Students enrolled in two or more pre-college/developmental studies courses may enroll in a 

maximum of 15 credit hours at the discretion of a Freshman Studies advisor with 
appropriate courses. 

PRE-COLLEGE/DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES 

DSE 099 Essentials of College English (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course prepares students to be successful in ENG 101 College Writing I. The course 
concentrates on the fundamentals of edited American English for writing and addresses 
grammar, mechanics, usage, sentence structure, and paragraph development in essays. 
Information technology is incorporated throughout the course. 

DSM 099 Essentials of College Math II (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course prepares students to be successful in MAT 110 Intermediate Algebra. As an 
introductory Algebra, the course covers simplifying and evaluating algebraic expressions, and 
solving linear equations involving integers, fractions, decimals, percents, and their applications. 
The course also covers reading and interpreting graphs, simplifying polynomials and 
exponents, factoring expressions, and solving basic geometry problems. 

DSR 099 Essentials of College Reading (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course helps students develop proficiency for reading university-level materials. The 
course emphasizes vocabulary development, comprehension, and critical thinking skills. 

Testing Center 

The Testing Center provides testing services for Florida Memorial University students, faculty, 
staff and the community. Florida Memorial University is a national test center. National tests 
include ACCUPLACER, ACT, SAT, CLEP, DSST, LSAT, and TOEFL. As a member of NCTA 
(National College Testing Association), the Center also participates in the CCTC (Consortium of 
College Testing Centers) which is a referral service that facilitates test administration services 
for distance learning students. In addition, the Center serves as a test site for several of the 
nation's leading certification and licensure testing companies. Services for faculty include 
proctoring exams, scoring multiple-choice tests and providing analyses of the results. Testing 
Center administers placement tests to freshmen to identify the students' academic levels in 
reading, writing and mathematics. Results from the assessment are used to advise students and 
design course schedules that encourage students to take advantage of their strengths and move 
toward improvement of their weaknesses. Florida Memorial University awards college credit 
for standardized examinations that authenticate the required knowledge and competencies for 



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one or more subject areas. The credit awarded, based on the University's approved course 
equivalents, will appear on the student's official College transcript as earned credit only. 

CORE CURRICULUM 

The purpose of the core curriculum is to expose students to a common body of knowledge 
which lays the foundation for upper level courses. The core curriculum is also designed to 
ensure that students have some exposure to the content and methods of inquiry in the major 
subject fields in a liberal arts education. The core curriculum follows: 

African American History (3 credits) Select 1 from the following: 
HIS 103 African American History I OR 
HIS 104 African American History II 

Communications (12 credits) 

ENG 101 College Writing I 

REA 101 Critical Thinking and Reading or 

ENG 111 First Year Literature 

ENG 102 College Writing II 

COM 103 Introduction to Public Speaking 

College and Life Skills (3 credits) 

FMU 101 University 101 

Health (2 credits) 

PED 110 Dimensions of Wellness 

Religion (3 credits) 

REL 101 Introduction to Religion or 
REL 201 Introduction to Philosophy 5 '' 

Natural Sciences (6 credits) Select 2 from the following: 
BIO 101 Biological Science 
PSC 101 Physical Science 

ENV 101 Introduction to Environmental Studies OR 
6 credits of more advanced science courses 

Quantitative Reasoning (6 credits) Select 1 option: 
Option I 

MAT 110 Intermediate Algebra 

MAT 111 College Algebra 
OR 
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6 credits of more advanced mathematics courses 

MAT 112 Pre-Calculus 

MAT 113 Trigonometry 

MAT 114 Finite Math* 

MAT 201 Calculus I 

MAT 202 Calculus II 

Humanities (3 credits) Select 1 from the following: 
ART 200 Art Appreciation 
DRA 200 Drama Appreciation 
MUS 200 Music Appreciation 
ENG 405 Creative Writing 

Technology (3 credits) Select 1: 

CSC 101 Introduction to Computers 
EDU 331 Instructional Technology* 
PEG 101 Introduction to Engineering** 

OR 

3 credits of a more advanced computer course 

Modern Foreign Language (6 credits) Select 1: 

SPA 201 Elementary Spanish I 
AND SPA 202 Elementary Spanish II 

OR 
FRE 201 Elementary French I 
AND FRE 202 Elementary French II 

OR 
CHI 201 Elementary Chinese I 
AND CHI 202 Elementary Chinese II 

OR 
SPA 323 Spanish for Native Speaker I 
AND SPA 324 Spanish for Native Speakers II 

OR 

FRE 312 French for Native Speakers I 
AND FRE 313 French for Native Speakers II 

Social Sciences (3 credits) Select 1 from the following: 
SOC 200 Introduction to Sociology 
OR 
PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 



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History/Government (3 credits) Select 1 from the following: 
ECO 201 Macroeconomics (for non-business majors) 
ECO 202 Microeconomics (for non-business majors) 
HIS 104 African American History II 
HIS 200 History of the United States 
POL 301 U.S. Government 

*Core requirement for Education Majors 
**Core requirement for V re-Engineer ing Majors 

Students are exempt from taking Educational and Life Seminar (FMC 101) if they are (a) 25 
years or older; (b) hold an associate of arts or science degree from a regionally accredited 
community University; (c) are transfer students and have taken an equivalent course at a 
regionally accredited college or university. 

Pre-College/Development Courses 

Students who on the basis of test scores administered by Florida Memorial University exhibit 
deficiencies in English, reading, or mathematics will be required to take appropriate courses 
prior to enrolling in courses in the Core Curriculum. Students will receive letter grades for these 
courses. Developmental courses will not be counted as part of credit hours required for 
graduation. Developmental courses become a part of the student's permanent academic record. 
Additional information pertaining to these courses is found in the Freshman Studies section of 
the catalog. 

Honors Program 

The Honors Program provides an alternative academic curriculum for highly motivated 
students. This advanced curriculum helps prepare students for study in graduate and 
professional schools upon graduation. The mission of the Honors Program is to inspire students 
to become leaders within both their professions and communities. 

Admission Criteria 

Admission to the Honors Program requires 

• High School GPA of 3.5 and above 

• Letters of Recommendation 

• SAT score of 1000 or better or ACT score of 23 or better 
Retention in Honors Program 

Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better to continue in the 
Honors Program. If the GPA falls below 3.0, the student will be allowed one semester to raise 
the GPA to the required level. 



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Honors Program Curriculum 

Students in the Honors Program curriculum take courses which replace certain core courses of 
the general education curriculum. Honors students will take Honors Seminar I & II in lieu of 
education and life seminar requirement; Honors Mathematics I and II in lieu of core 
mathematics requirement; Honors English I and II in lieu of core English requirements and 
Reading 101; Insight I and II in lieu of core science requirements; Technology (honors) in lieu of 
Introduction to Computers; African American History I and II. Please see the Honors Advisor 
for approval upon satisfactory completion of courses. 



First Year 



MAT 103H 


Honors Mathematics I 


3 


ENG104H 


Honors English I 


3 


SCI 104H 


Insight I (Science) 


3 


SEM 101H 


Honors Seminar I 


1 


MAT 104H 


Honors Mathematics II 


3 


ENG 105H 


Honors English II 


3 


SCI 104H 


Insight II (Science) 


3 


SEM 102H 


Honors Seminar II 


! 


Second Year 






CSC 202H 


Technology (Honors) 


3 


HIS201H 


African American History I 


3 


HIS 202H 


African American History II 


3 


Third Year 






RSC 303H 


Research Methods (Honors) 


3 


Fourth Year 







RSC 403H 



Honors Thesis 



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School of 

ARTS & SCIENCES 

The mission of the School of Arts and Sciences is to explore the story of the universe and to 
equip students with the skills they will need to write the next chapter in that story. The School 
offers its majors and programs through six departments, and is responsible for providing all 
students with the Liberal Arts foundation that will enable them both to be successful in their 
chosen major and to be life-long learners. 

Department Of Aviation and safety 

The Department of Aviation & Safety offers the following degree programs: 

• The Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Science (Concentration in Flight Education) 

• The Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Science (Concentration in Air Traffic Control) 

• The Bachelor of Science in Airway Science (Concentration in Airway Science 

Management) 

• Minor in Homeland Security 

• Minor in Aviation Safety 

The Department offers rigorous programs designed to educate future administrators and 
technical managers of the aerospace industry. The curriculum stresses quantitative reasoning, 
human factors, human resources management, written and oral communications, computer 
literacy, and aeronautics. In addition, aviation programs incorporate problem recognition and 
solving, critical thinking, and decision-making to bridge the gap between theory and practice. 
Individuals with an aviation related degree will have a broad perspective of the aerospace 
industry, the environments in which it operates, and its impact on global transportation and 
economics. 

Academics and flight instruction are supported by a fleet of enclosed simulators. Students must 
complete all major courses with a grade of C (2.0) or better and maintain a minimum 
cumulative GPA of 2.0. 

Department Mission Statement 

The Department of Aviation & Safety produces students who embrace the importance of 
becoming global citizens through life-long learning, leadership, character, and service in the 
field of aerospace, safety and security, which will, in turn, enhance their lives and the lives of 
others. 



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Departmental Goals 

Graduates of the department will 

• demonstrate the ability to function effectively in technical, administrative, supervisory, 
managerial, and crewmember positions in the aerospace industry. 

• demonstrate an understanding of the technical nature of the aerospace industry and the 
interfaces that exist between and among technology, human, and other resources. 

Departmental Student Learning Outcomes 

Graduates of the department will 

apply mathematics, science and applied sciences to aviation-related disciplines 

demonstrate the ability to analyze a problem, identify and define the computing 

requirements appropriate to its solution 

demonstrate the ability to design, implement and evaluate a computer-based system, 

process, component, or program to meet desired needs 

demonstrate the ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal. 

demonstrate the ability to make professional and ethical decisions 

demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively, using both written and oral 

communication skills 

demonstrate the ability to engage in and recognize the need for life-long learning and 

assess contemporary issues 

demonstrate the ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern technology necessary 

for professional practice 

demonstrate the ability to assess the national and international aviation environment. 

Bachelor of Science in 

Aeronautical Science 

(Concentration in Air Traffic Control) 

This program prepares students to apply technical knowledge and skills to air traffic 
management and control. It includes instruction in flight control; the use of radar and electronic 
scanning devices; plotting of flights; radio communication; interpretation of weather conditions 
affecting flights; flight instrumentation used by pilots; and maintenance of flight-control center 
or control-tower log books. This degree program further prepares students to become qualified 
for hire by the FAA or private sector entities providing air traffic control services. 

IMPORTANT NOTE: Prior to selecting the Air Traffic Control concentration, an interested 
student must meet with the Director of Aviation & Safety to determine eligibility. The Federal 
Aviation Administration imposes specific conditions and requirements upon all prospective 
controllers and employees. In addition, while graduates will have received extensive training in 
air traffic control, they must pass the Air Traffic Selection and Training Test Battery (ATSAT), a 

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rigorous physical exam, a drug test, and an intensive security and background investigation 
before employment with the FAA can be pursued. 

Program Mission 

The Aeronautical Science (Concentration in Air Traffic Control) Program prepares students to 
apply technical knowledge and skills to air traffic management and control. 

Program Goal 

Students will pass the Air Traffic Selection and Training Test (ATSAT) with a highly qualified 
rating. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Graduates will 

• demonstrate proficiency in airport ground operations, radar and electronic scanning 
devices and flight plotting. 

• demonstrate proficiency in oral/written communication. 

• demonstrate proficiency in interpretation of weather conditions affecting flight 
operations. 

• demonstrate proficiency in the maintenance of flight-control center or control-tower log 
books. 

• demonstrate sound judgment and decision making concerning all areas of flight safety. 

Graduation Requirements 

This program requires a minimum of 122 semester hours for completion. 53 credit hours are 
devoted to required core curriculum courses; 51 credit hours cover Aviation/Air Traffic Control 
courses; 3 hours are devoted to business courses; and 9 hours of additional electives. All core air 
traffic control courses must be completed with a grade of "B" (3.0) or better. 

Freshman Year 

First Semester Second Semester 

AWS201 Intro to Aeronautics 3 CSC 101 Intro to Computers 3 

ENG 101 College Writing I 3 ENG 102 College Writing II 3 

FMU 101 University 101 3 HIS 103 African American His I 3 

COM 103 Intro to Public Speaking 3 PED 110 Dimension of Wellness 2 
REA 101 Critical Think & Read 3 MAT 111 College Algebra 3 

or 
ENG 111 First Year Lit 

15 14 



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Sophomore Year 
First Semester 

AWS 232 Air Traffic Control 
AWS 200 Aviation History 
BIO 101 Biological Science 
MAT 112 Pre Calculus 
Foreign Language I 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Second Semester 

PSY 200 Intro to Psychology 
BUS 2 1 1 Prin. of Management 
REL 201 Intro, to Philosophy 
AWS 316 Terminal Operations I 
Foreign Language II 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
L5 



Junior Year 
First Semester 

HIS/GOV Req. 

AWS 240 Aviation Weather 

Aviation Elective 

ENG 309 Adv Gram& Eng Comp 
MAT 200 Applied Calculus 
AWS 235 Air Traffic Control Ops 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 



Second Semester 

PSC 101 Physical Science 
Aviation Elective 
MAT 205 Intro to Prob & Stats. 
AWS 315 ATC Radar Procedures 
AWS 320 Air Transportation 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



Senior Year 
First Semester 

AWS 395 Airport Mgt 

AWS 305 VFR Tower Ops 

AWS 410 Adv. Tower Operations 

AWS 420 Flight Safety 

AWS 401 Nat'l Airspace System 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Second Semester 

AWS 412 Enroute Operations 
AWS 450 Sr. Project in Aviation 
AWS 418 Crew Resource Mgt 

Aviation Elective 

BUS 361 Leadership App. 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Total Credit Hours 122 

Approved Aviation Electives = Any courses above 100 from AWS, BUS, SAF, CSC, AHS 

Minor in Aviation Safety 

This program serves as a foundation for students who have an interest in pursuing graduate work or a career in this 
area of study. Students are required to complete a minimum of eighteen credit hours from the courses listed below. 
These eighteen credit hour courses must include AWS 201, AWS 420, and SAF 101. An additional nine credits must 
come from the selection listed below. All courses must be completed with a grade of "C" (2.0) or better. 

Core Course Requirements Credits 

AWS 201 Introductions to Aeronautics *# 3 

AWS 420 Flight Safety *# 3 

SAF 101 Intro, to Occupational Health & Safety 3 

At least nine credits must be chosen from the following: 

SAF 110 System Safety 3 

SAF 241 Safety and Security of Aviation Ground Operations 3 

SAF 245 Industrial Safety and Health Management 3 

AWS 232 Air Traffic Control (Preq- AWS 201, or AVT201) # 3 



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AWS 240 Aviation Weather* 3 

AWS 415 Seminar in Aviation Science 3 

AWS 418 Crew Resource Management* 3 

AWS 425 Aircraft Accident Investigation 3 

AWS 430 Flight Physiology * 3 

* = Courses required for Aeronautical Science Degree 

# = Courses required for Airway Science Degree 

Note: Students majoring in Aeronautical Science, Airway Science or Air Traffic Control must select courses not 
listed as core requirements for their prospective academic degree programs. 

Minor in Homeland Security 

This minor has a strong focus on the nation's transportation infrastructure and planning for, 
responding to, and emergency management of events dealing with acts of terrorism and natural 
and man-made disasters. This minor complements degrees in safety, aeronautical science, 
airway science management, and criminal justice. 18 credit hours are required from the 
following courses: 

Course Title Credits 

AHS 101 Introduction to Homeland Security 3 

AHS 105 Fundamentals of Transportation Security 3 

AHS 201 Contemporary Security Management 3 

AHS 215 Disaster Recovery 3 

AHS 310 Homeland Security Law and Policy 3 

AHS 320 Terrorism & Homeland Security 3 

AHS 321 Corporate Security 3 

AHS 325 Border Security and Homeland Defense 3 

AHS 326 Maritime Security 3 

Additional Information 

This minor consists of at least 18 hours of coherent academic course work. At least 6 hours must 
be fulfilled at the upper level (300- 400). In addition, at least 6 hours of course work applied to 
this minor must be completed at Florida Memorial University. Students are required to earn a 
grade of C (2.0) or higher to pass. 

Bachelor of Science in 

Aeronautical Science 

Concentration in Flight Education 

The concentration in Flight Education is the Professional Pilot Program. Students completing 
this degree will earn the appropriate Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certificates 
necessary to seek employment as flight crew members and flight instructors. All flight training 
is conducted off-campus at a designated Part 141 Flight Training School. 



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THERE ARE SIGNIFICANT COSTS ASSOCIATED WITH FLIGHT TRAINING. Prior to 
selecting the Flight Education concentration, interested students MUST meet with the Director 
of Aviation & Safety to discuss eligibility requirements as specified by Federal Aviation 
Regulations as well as cost considerations for flight training. These issues must be fully 
understood by the student and his/her parents or guardians prior to enrollment. 

Program Goal 

Graduates of the Aeronautical Science (Concentration in Flight Education) Degree Program will 
be proficient aviators who embrace the importance of becoming global citizens through life-long 
learning, leadership, character, and service in the field of aviation. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Graduates of the Aeronautical Science program with a concentration in Flight Education will 

• perform all tasks specified in the areas of operation for the certificate or rating sought 
with the approved standards. 

• demonstrate a mastery of the aircraft with the successful outcome of each task 
performed. 

• demonstrate sound judgment and demonstrate single-pilot competencies. 

• exhibit knowledge of the elements related to weather information by analyzing weather 
reports, charts and forecasts from various sources. 

• demonstrate knowledge of the aerospace industry and the interfaces that exist between 
and among technology, human, and other resources. 

Graduation Requirements 

This program requires a minimum of 120 semester hours for completion. 58 credit hours are for 
required core curriculum courses; 18 credit hours cover aviation technology courses; 32 hours 
are devoted to aviation science course; and 12 hours are required for additional electives. 



Freshman Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




AWS 200 


Aviation History 


3 


AVT 202 


Priv Pilot (Flight) 


-i 


AWS201 


Intro to Aeronautics or 
Priv Pilot Cert. (Ground) 


3 


AVT 203 


Navigation & Pert. 


3 


ENG 101 


College Writing 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 


COM 103 


Intro to Public Spkg. 


3 
15 


CSC 101 


Intro to Computers 


3 
14 



Sophomore Year 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



AVT 301 Instr. Pilot Rating (Grnd) 3 AVT 303 

AVT 302 Instr. Pilot Rating (Fit) 2 AVT 304 

AWS 420 Flight Safety 3 AWS 240 



Com. Pilot Cert. (Grnd) 3 
Com. Pilot Cert. (Fit) 2 

Aviation Weather 3 



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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



HIS 103 


African American His. I 


3 


REA 101 


Crit. Thkng & Read or 


3 


PED110 


Dim. Of Wellness 


2 


ENG111 


First Year Literature 




ENV 101 


Intro to Environ. Science 


3 
lb 


BUS 211 


Prin. of Management 


3 
14 


Junior Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 






Aviation Elective 


3 




Aviation Elective 


3 


AWS 270 


Aircraft Engines 


3 


SSC 102 


Cont. Society II 


3 


BIO 101 


Biological Science 


3 





Foreign Language II 


3 





Foreign Language I 


3 


PHY 200 


College Physics I 


3 


MAT 112 


College Algebra 


3 


PHY 201 


College Physics I Lab 


1 








REL 201 


Intro to Philosophy 


3 






15 






16 



Senior Year 
First Semester 

AVT 405 Multi-Eng Aircraft Sys. 

AWS 310 Aviation Legislation 
AWS 430 Flight Physiology 
AWS 450 Senior Project Aviation 
Aviation Elective 





Second Semester 




3 




Aviation Elective 


3 


3 


AWS 418 


Crew Resource Mgt. 


3 


3 


BUS 361 


Leadership Applications 


3 


3 


ENG 308 


Adv. Grammar & Comp. 


3 


3 


PSY 200 


Intro. To Psychology 


3 


15 






15 



Bachelor of Science in 

Airway Science 

(Concentration in Airway Science Management) 

A degree in Airway Science Management prepares students for administrative, supervisory, 
and managerial positions in the aviation industry. The program is oriented to the business 
nature and human resource needs of the aviation industry. Graduates may pursue entry level 
positions in airport management, general aviation operations, air carrier management, and 
various government agencies. All core aviation courses must be completed with a grade of "C" 
(2.0) or better. 

Program Mission 

Graduates of the Aeronautical Science (Concentration in Airway Science Management) Program 
will embrace the importance of becoming global citizens through life-long learning, leadership, 
character, and service in the fields of aviation management. 



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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Program Goals: 

Graduates will 

• demonstrate the ability to function effectively in technical, administrative, supervisory, 
and managerial positions in the aerospace industry. 

• demonstrate a mastery of the technical nature of the aerospace industry and the 
interfaces that exist between and among technology, human, and other resources. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Graduates will 

• demonstrate an understanding and awareness of the aviation management culture. 

• demonstrate knowledge and appreciation of airport/airline management and security, 
finance, decision-making and the air transportation system. 

• demonstrate knowledge of federal and other aviation regulations and non-aviation 
regulations appropriate to aviation business operations. 

Graduation Requirements 

This program requires a minimum of 120 semester hours for completion. 54 credit hours are for 
required core curriculum courses; 33 credit hours cover aviation science courses; 12 hours are 
devoted to business courses; and 15 hours are required for additional electives. 



Freshman Year 








First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 1 02 College Writing II 


3 


AWS200 


Aviation History 


3 


CSC 101 Intro to Comp 


3 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3 


AWS201 Intro to Aero 


3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 


Aviation Elective 


3 


REA 101 


Crit Think/Read or 


3 


HIS 103 Afri Amer Hist I 


3 


ENG 111 


First Year Lit 


IS 




L5 


Sophomore 


Year 








First Semester 




Second Semester 




AWS232 


Air Traffic Control 


3 


Aviation Elective 


3 


BIO 101 


Biological Science 


3 


COM 103 Intro Pub Spk 


3 


BUS 211 


Principal of Mgmt. 


3 


Foreign Language II 


3 





Foreign Language I 


3 


BUS 480 Managerial Psych. 


3 


PSY 200 


Intro to Psy. 


3 

15 


REL201 Intro to Philosophy 


3 
is 


Junior Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




PHY 200 


College Physics I 


3 


AWS310 Aviation Legis. 


3 


PHY 201 


College Physics I Lab 


1 


PSC 101 Physical Science 


3 



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Florida Memorial University 
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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



MAR 301 Principles of Mktg. 3 

Aviation Elective 3 

ENG 309 Adv. Grammar & Comp 3 
AWS 320 Air Transportation 3 

16 



PED110 Dim. of Wellness 2 

SSC 201 Contem. Societies II 3 
SOC 305 Group Dynamics 3 

14 



Senior Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




AWS 390 


Airline Mgmt 


3 


FIN 311 


Prin. of Finance 


3 


AWS 420 


Flight Safety 


3 


AWS 351 


Aviation Labor Rel. 


3 


ACC211 


Prin. of Accounting I 


3 


AWS 450 


Sr. Project in A via. 


3 


BUS 350 


Human Resource Mgt. 


3 


BUS 361 


Leadership Appl. 


3 





Aviation Elective 


3 
15 





Aviation Elective 


3 
15 



Approved Aviation Electives = Any Course above 100 from CSC, AWS, BUS, SAF, AHS 

Department Of Computer Sciences, Mathematics, and Technology 

The Department of Computer Science, Mathematics, and Technology offers the following 
degrees: 

• The Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems 

• The Bachelor of Science in Computer Science 

• The Bachelor of Science in Management Information Systems 

• The Bachelor of Science in Mathematics 

The Computer Information Systems (CIS) major provides an opportunity for students to learn 
to combine general business knowledge with the latest software engineering tools and 
techniques to create and exploit information systems for organization success. The CIS major is 
a business-related program that focuses on application development. The program prepares 
students for occupations similar to computer science but with an application-related slant. The 
CIS student must thoroughly understand the requirements of a business organization to design 
and specify computer systems. 



The Computer Science (CS) major provides an opportunity to study algorithms and data 
structures, and to apply the hardware and software implementations of computers and 
computer systems. The Computer Science major covers theory and programming. The 
program also prepares students for a possible research career as well as diverse careers, such as 
game programming, database design, artificial intelligence, networking, and robotics. 

The Management Information Systems (MIS) major takes a broad perspective of the computer 
field extending to management of computers in the business world and the application of 
information technology. The MIS major is business related and focuses on management of 
businesses and computer resources along with the behavioral and organizational studies. The 
MIS major is more business related than the CIS degree and contains less technical emphasis. 

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The Mathematics (MAT) major prepares students for advanced studies or careers as 
mathematicians, actuaries, mathematical economists, operations researchers, or teachers of 
mathematics. Mathematics concentrates on the systematic evaluation of mathematic formulas 
and the application of pure science to real-world problems. 

Department Mission Statement 

The mission of the Department of Computer Sciences, Mathematics and Technology is to 
produce graduates who demonstrate knowledge of the fundamentals of their disciplines, 
intellectual maturity, and high moral and ethical standards. Our graduates will be aware of 
contemporary local, national, and global issues, they will become lifelong learners, and they will 
seek continual professional improvements to adapt to the ever-changing technological demands 
of the contemporary workplace. 

In addition, the Department equips general education students with the technological and 
analytical skills necessary to perform effectively in their careers or professions. 

Departmental Goals 

1 . To create and maintain a high quality education for students 

2. To teach students to develop an analytical ability to solve problems using mathematics, and 
computer and information sciences in a socially responsible way, so that they may continue 
to apply their knowledge as technology evolves 

3. To offer up-to-date technology and laboratory experiences, so students will have 
technological skills that are current in the workplace 

4. To encourage faculty professional development, so that faculty members remain current in 
their field 

5. To support faculty and students in scholarly activities. 

Departmental Requirements 

1. Complete a minimum of 121 credit hours, including all general education requirements, 
with a minimum cumulative G.P.A. of 2.0 

2. Complete all major courses with a minimum grade of "C" 

3. Complete all course requirements and credit hours specified by the degree program 

4. Successfully complete a senior project 

5. Complete the department exit examination. 



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Florida Memorial University 

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Bachelor of Science in 

Computer Information Systems 

The Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Information Systems (CIS) prepares the student for 
a career using information technology and the computer as tools to solve business problems and 
to provide organizations with strategic advantages in business operation. 

The mission of the CIS program is to produce graduates who demonstrate technical proficiency 
and those essential business skills necessary to successfully perform in various information 
technology environments. 

Graduates of the CIS program will have a firm foundation in business and technology and an 
understanding of the way technology helps accomplish applicable goals and objectives. 

The CIS major prepares students for possible careers as technical support specialists, computer 
operators, database administrators, database programmers, system analysts, software engineers, 
web programmers, network administrators, and multimedia specialists. 

Program Goals 

The goals of the BS in Computer Information Systems (CIS) program are to ensure that 
graduates will have the following: 

1. The acquisition of quantitative, analytical, problem-solving, and modern business, 
programming, and technology skills needed to perform effectively in a business 
environment as an information scientist and/or a graduate student 

2. The interpersonal skills essential for productive teamwork and effective written, oral, 
and graphical communication skills in public settings 

3. The professional and social responsibilities and knowledge of ethical values of modern 
local and global information technology. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Each CIS graduate will demonstrate the following: 

A. An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the 
discipline 

B. An ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements 
appropriate to its solution 

C. An ability to design, implement and evaluate a computer-based system, process, 
component, or program to meet desired needs 

D. An ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal 

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Florida Memorial University 

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E. An understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security, and social issues and 
responsibilities 

F. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences 

G. An ability to analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, 
organizations, and society 

H. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, continuing professional 

development 
I. An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practices 
J. An understanding of processes that support the delivery and management of 

information systems within a business application environment. 

Computer Information Systems Course Requirements 

I. General Education Core Courses (38 credit hours) 

CSC101 Introduction to Computers 

FMU101 University 101 

REA101/ Critical Thinking & Reading or 

ENG111 First Year Literature 

ENG101 College Writing I 

ENG102 College Writing II 

COM103 Introduction to Public Speaking 

REL101 Introduction to Religion 

PED110 Dimensions of Wellness (2) 

Social Sciences Requirement 

African American History 

Humanities Requirement 

Modern Foreign Languages I 

Modern Foreign Languages II 

Science Courses include one semester laboratory science (7 credit hours) 

Natural Sciences Requirement I 

Natural Sciences Requirement II 

Natural Sciences Requirement Lab 



II. Mathematics/Statistics Courses (12 credit hours) 

M ATI 11 College Algebra 
MAT200 Applied Calculus 
MAT205 Probability and Statistics 
MAT210 Discrete Mathematics 

in. CIS Environment Courses (21 credit hours) 

ACC211 Principles of Accounting I 

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Florida Memorial University 
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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



ACC352 Managerial Accounting 

BUS 211 Principles of Management 

MAR301 Principles of Marketing 

ECO Economics Elective (Macro Economics or Micro Economics) 

FIN301 Business Finance 

Business or Computer Elective 

IV. Computer Courses (42 credit hours) 

List of Computer Classes required for a Major in Computer Information Systems: (42 

semester hours of which at least 18 must be advanced.) 

Core Computer Information System (24 credit hours) 

CSC230 Computer Programming I 

CSC330 Computer Programming II 

CSC333 Systems Analysis and Design 

CSC341 Computer Organization 

CSC360 Computer Operating Systems 

CSC375 Network and Data Communication 

CSC483 Database Concepts and Design 

CSC494 Software Project Development 

Advanced Computer Information Systems Electives (18 credit hours) 

CSC345 Web Technology 

CSC350 Special Problems I 

CSC351 Special Problems II 

CSC385 Artificial Intelligence 

CSC405 Programming Languages 

CSC430 Computer Programming III 

CSC445 Management Information Systems 

CSC460* Senior Project (Capstone Course) 

CSC475 Computer Algorithm 

CSC487 Database (SQL) Programming 

CSC490* Computer Ethics 

CSC493 Computer Security 

CSC498 Cooperative Education in Computer Science I 

CSC499 Cooperative Education in Computer Science II 

* must include these courses 



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Florida Memorial University 
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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Graduation Requirements 

This degree program requires a minimum of 120 semester hours for completion. 



Freshman 
First Semester 



CSC 101 

MAT 111 
ENG 101 
FMU 101 
Kl A Hll 
or ENG 1 1 1 



Intro to Computers 
College Algebra 
College Writing I 
University 101 
Critical Think & Read 
First Year Literature 



Second Semester 



3 
3 
3 


CSC 230 


Comp Programming I 
Natural Science Req. I 
African American Hist. 


3 
3 
3 


3 
3 


ENG 102 
REL 101 


College Writing II 
Intro to Religion 


3 
3 



IS 



15 



Sophomore 
First Semester 



CSC 330 
MAT 200 



COM 103 
PED110 



Comp Programming II 

Applied Calculus 

Nat. Science Req. II 

Nat. Science Req. II 

Lab 

Intro to Public Spk. 

Dim. Of Wellness 



Second Semester 



3 


CSC 333 


Sys Analysis & 


3 


3 




Design 




3 


MAT 210 


Discrete Math. 


3 


I 





Economics Elective 
(Mac/Micro) 


3 


3 




Humanities Req. 


3 


2 




Social Science Req. 


3 


15 






15 



Junior 

First Semester 

CSC 341 Computer Organ. 

CSC 360 Operating Systems. 

ACC 21 1 Prin. Of Accounting I 
BUS 2 1 1 Principles of Mgmt 

Foreign Lang. Req. I 



Second Semester 



3 


CSC 375 


Network & Data Comm. 


3 


3 


ACC 352 


Managerial Accounting 


3 


3 


FIN 301 


Business Finance 


3 


3 
3 
15 





Advanced Comp Elec 
Foreign Lang. Req. II 


3 
3 
15 



Senior 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




CSC483 Database Concepts & Desi. 
CSC494 Systems Development 

Bus or Comp Elective 

Advanced Comp. Elec. 

MAT205 Probability & Statistics 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 


CSC460 
CSC490 

MAR301 


Senior Project 
Computer Ethics 
Adv. Comp. Elec. 
Adv. Comp. Elec. 
Marketing 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Minor in Computer Information Systems 

Note: Students choosing to minor in Computer Information Systems must ensure that all prerequisites necessary for the courses 
listed below are met including mathematics prerequisites. 

CSC333 Systems Analysis & Design 

CSC330 Computer Programming II 

CSC360 Computer Operating Systems 

CSC341 Computer Organization 

CSC375 Networks and Data Communications 



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Florida Memorial University 

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CSC483 Database Concepts and Design 

Bachelor of Science in 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

The Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science (CS) prepares students for technical 
leadership in the information technology industry and for continuing toward an advanced 
degree and research in Computer Science. 

The mission of the Computer Science program is to produce professionally knowledgeable and 
well-rounded graduates who are prepared to meet the ethical and social obligations in the field 
of information technology. 

The study of Computer Science exposes students to a broad range of fundamental concepts: in 
programming, data structures, operating systems, database systems, computer architecture, and 
software engineering. The major may lead to careers as computer programmers, system 
analysts, software engineers, networking engineers, web developers, database administrators, 
or systems programmers. This degree is ideal for students who are planning to continue their 
studies to achieve careers in academics and research in the field of Computer Science. 

Program Goals 

The goals of the BS in Computer Science program are to ensure that graduates will have the 
following: 

1. A strong foundation in computer science, along with the analytical, problem-solving, 
and modern programming technical skills and competencies needed to perform 
effectively as computer scientists 

2. The interpersonal skills essential for productive teamwork and effective written, oral, 
and graphical communication skills in public settings 

3. A solid knowledge base and a social awareness, including ethical values needed to 
perform in the local and global information technology industry. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Each CS graduate will demonstrate the following: 

A. An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the 
discipline 

B. An ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements 
appropriate to its solution 

C. An ability to design, implement and evaluate a computer-based system, process, 
component, or program to meet desired needs 

D. An ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal 

E. An understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security, and social issues and 
responsibilities 

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Florida Memorial University 

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F. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences 

G. An ability to analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, 
organizations, and society 

H. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, continuing professional 

development 
I. An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practices 
J. An ability to apply mathematical foundations, algorithmic principles, and computer 

science theory in the modeling and design of computer-based systems in a way that 

demonstrates comprehension of the tradeoffs involved in design choices 
K. An ability to apply design and development principles in the construction of software 

systems of varying complexity. 

I. General Education Core Courses (38 credit hours) 

CSC101 Introduction to Computers 

FMU101 University 101 

REA101/ENG1 1 1 Critical Thinking & Reading or First Year Literature 

ENG101 College Writing I 

ENG102 College Writing II 

COM103 Introduction to Public Speaking 

REL101 Introduction to Religion 

PED110 Dimensions of Wellness (2) 

Social Sciences Requirement 

African American History 

Humanities Requirement 

Modern Foreign Languages I 

Modern Foreign Languages II 

II. Support Courses - Mathematics & Sciences 
Mathematics/Statistics Courses (15 credit hours) 

MAT201 Calculus I 
MAT202 Calculus II 
MAT205 Probability & Statistics 
MAT210 Discrete Mathematics 
Advanced Mathematics Electives 
MAT305* Geometry 
MAT350* Linear Algebra 
MAT211* Discrete Mathematics II 
MAT307* Number Theory 
MAT411* Numerical Analysis I 
* choose only one advanced math 



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Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Science Courses (14 hours) 

Fourteen (14) hours of science include the equivalent of a two semester sequence in a laboratory 
science are required. 

Natural Sciences Requirement I 

Natural Sciences Requirement II 

PHY201 College Physics I 
PHY202 College Physics I Lab 
PHY203 College Physics II 
PHY204 College Physics II Lab 

III. Computer Science Courses (51 credit hours) 

List of Computer Science Classes required for a Major in Computer Science: (45 semester hours of which 18 must be 
advanced) 

Core Computer Science (21 credit hours) 

CSC230 Computer Programming I 

CSC330 Computer Programming II 

CSC335 Data Structures 

CSC341 Computer Organization 

CSC360 Computer Operating Systems 

CSC430 Computer Programming III 

CSC490 Computer Ethics 

Advance Core Computer Science 22 credit hours) 

CSC375 Network and Data Communication 

CSC385 Artificial Intelligence 

CCS395 Software Engineering Principles 

CSC405 Programming Languages 

CSC483 Database Concepts & Design 

CSC494 Software Project Development 

CSC460 Senior Project (Capstone Course) 

Computer Science Electives (12 credit hours) 

CSC350 Special Problems I 

CSC351 Special Problems II 

CSC475 Complexity & Analysis of Algorithms 

CSC493 Computer Security 

CSC487 Database (SQL) Programming 

CSC498 Cooperative Education in Computer Science I 

CSC499 Cooperative Education in Computer Science II 



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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Graduation Requirements 

This degree program requires a minimum of 121 semester hours for completion. 



Freshman 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




CSC 101 Intro to Computers 


3 


CSC 230 


Computer Program I 


3 


MAT 201 Calculus I 


3 


MAT 202 


Calculus II 


3 


ENG 101 College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


FMU 101 University 101 


3 


REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


3 


REA 101 Critical Think & Read 


3 


PED 1 10 


Dim. of Wellness 


2 



or ENG 111 First Year Literature 



IS 



N 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Sophomore 
First Semester 

CSC 330 Computer Program II 
MAT205 Probability & Statistics 

Natural Science Req I 

African American Hist 

Intro to Public Spking. 

Junior 

First Semester 

CSC341 Computer Organization. 3 
CSC360 Operating Systems 3 

CSC385 Artificial Intelligence 3 
PHY200 College Physics I 3 

PHY201 College Physics I Lab 1 
Foreign Language Req. I 3 
16 



Second Semester 

CSC335 Data Structure 
MAT210 Discrete Mathematics 

Natural Science Req II 

Humanities Req. 

Social Sciences Req. 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



Second Semester 

CSC430 Computer Program III 3 

CSC375 Network & Data Com. 3 

MAT Advanced Math Elective 3 

PHY202 College Physics II 3 

PHY203 College Physics II Lab 1 

Foreign Lang. Req. II 3 

16 



Senior 

First Semester 

CSC395 Software Engineering 3 

CSC405 Programming Lang 3 

CSC483 Database Concepts & Des3 

CSC Computer Science Elec. 3 

Elective 3 

15 



Second Semester 

CSC460 Senior Project 
CSC475 Complex & Ana of Alg. 
CSC494 Software Project Dev. 
CSC490 Computer Ethics 
CSC Computer Science Elec. 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Minor in Computer Science 

Note: Students choosing to minor in Computer Science must ensure that all prerequisites necessary for the courses listed below 

are met including mathematics requirements. 

CSC335 Data Structures 

CSC341 Computer Organization 

CSC360 Computer Operating Systems 

CSC430 Computer Programming III 

CSC375 Networks and Data Communications 

CSC405 Programming Languages 



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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Bachelor of Science in 

Management Information Systems 

The Bachelor of Science degree program in Management Information Systems (MIS) provides 
students with the skills and knowledge required for employment in computer and business 
industries. 

The mission of the MIS program is to produce graduates who demonstrate both the managerial 
and technical expertise necessary to manage and control the information system resources of an 
organization. 

MIS graduates have the flexibility of finding careers in any industry as programmers, systems 
analysts, business managers, technical support personnel, web designers, database 
administrators, network and security specialists, as well as other managerial positions. 

Program Goals 

The goals of the BS in Management Information Systems program are to produce graduates 
who will have the following: 

1. Sufficient quantitative, analytical, and problem solving skills in conjunction with a 
foundation in business, management, system analysis and design, and programming 
skills to solve and to manage information technology as a tactical resource in a business 
organization 

2. The skills to work cooperatively in a team, and to disseminate the results and findings to 
provide recommendations in an effectively written and oral presentation using 
computer applications 

3. The professional and ethical values and broad knowledge needed to be a responsible, 
well-rounded citizen of contemporary society. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Each management information system graduate will demonstrate the following: 

a. An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the 

discipline 

b. An ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements 

appropriate to its solution 

c. An ability to design, implement and evaluate a computer-based system, process, 

component, or program to meet desired needs 

d. An ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal 

e. An understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security, and social issues and 

responsibilities 

f. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences 

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g. An ability to analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, 

organizations, and society 
h. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, continuing professional 

development 
i. An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practices 
j. An understanding of processes that support the delivery and management of information 

systems within a business organization. 

Management Information Systems Course Requirements 

I. General Education Core Courses (38 credit hours) 

CSC101 Introduction to Computers 

FMU101 University 101 

REA101/ENG111 Critical Thinking & Reading or First Year Literature 

ENG101 College Writing I 

ENG102 College Writing II 

COM103 Introduction to Public Speaking 

REL101 Introduction to Religion 

PED110 Dimensions of Wellness (2) 

Social Sciences Requirement 

African American History 

Humanities Requirement 

Modern Foreign Languages I 

Modern Foreign Languages II 

Science Courses include one semester laboratory science (7 credit hours) 

Natural Sciences Requirement I 

Natural Sciences Requirement II 

Natural Sciences Requirement Lab 

II. Mathematics/Statistics Courses (12 credit hours) 
MAT111 College Algebra 

MAT200 Applied Calculus 
MAT205 Probability and Statistics 
MAT210 Discrete Mathematics 

III. MIS Environment Courses (21 credit hours) 
ACC211 Principles of Accounting I 

ACC212 Principles of Accounting II 

BUS 211 Principles of Management 

BUS311 Business Law 

ECO Economics Elective (Macro or Micro) 

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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



FIN301 Business Finance 
MAR301 Principles of Marketing 
Business or Computer Elective 

IV. Computer Courses (42 credit hours) 

List of Computer Classes required for a Major in Management Information Systems: (42 semester hours of which 
at least 18 must be advanced.) 

Core Management Information System (24 credit hours) 

CSC230 Computer Programming I 

CSC250 Visual Basic Programming 

CSC333 Systems Analysis and Design 

CSC341 Computer Organization 

CSC360 Computer Operating Systems 

CSC375 Network and Data Communication 

CSC483 Database Concepts and Design 

CSC494 Software Project Development 

Advanced Management Information Systems Electives (18 credit hours) 

CSC345 Web Technology 

CSC350 Special Problems I 

CSC351 Special Problems II 

CSC385 Artificial Intelligence 

CSC405 Programming Languages 

CSC430 Computer Programming III 

CSC445 Management Information Systems 

CSC460* Senior Project (Capstone Course) 

CSC475 Computer Algorithm 

CSC487 Database (SQL) Programming 

CSC490* Computer Ethics 

CSC493 Computer Security 

CSC498 Cooperative Education in Computer Science I 

CSC499 Cooperative Education in Computer Science II 

* must include these courses 



Graduation Requirements 

This degree program requires a minimum of 122 semester hours for completion. 



Freshman 
First Semester 
CSC 101 
MAT 111 
ENG101 
FMU 101 



Intro to Computers 3 

College Algebra 3 

College Writing I 3 

University 101 3 



Second Semester 

CSC 230 Comp Programming I 3 

Natural Science Req. I 3 

Micro Computer App. 3 

ENG 102 College Writing II 3 



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RE A 101 Critical Think & Read 

or ENG 111 First Year Literature 



3 
15 



REL 101 Intro to Religion 



IS 



Sophomore 
First Semester 



CSC 330 
MAT 200 



CSC 250 
PED110 



Comp Programming II 
Applied Calculus 
Nat. Science Req. II 
Nat. Science Req. II Lab 
Visual Basic Prog. 
Dim. Of Wellness 



Second Semester 



3 


CSC 333 


Sys Analysis & Design 


3 


3 


MAT210 


Discrete Math. 


3 


3 


COM103 


Intro to Public Speaking 


3 


I 


ECO_ 


Macro/Micro Economics 


3 


3 


HIS_ 


African American Hist 


3 


2 





Social Science Req. 


3 


14 






IS 



Junior 

First Semester 

CSC 341 Computer Organ. 

CSC 360 Operating Systems 

ACC 21 1 Prin. Of Accounting I 

BUS 2 11 Principles of Mgmt 

Foreign Lang. Req. I 



Second Semester 



3 


CSC 375 


Network & Data Comm. 


3 


3 


ACC 212 


Prin. Of Accounting 11 


3 


3 


FIN 301 


Business Finance 


3 


3 





Humanity Elective 


3 


3 





Foreign Lang. Req. II 


3 


15 






L5 



Senior 

First Semester 

CSC445 Management Info. Sys. 

CSC494 Systems Development 

Business Law 

CSC483 Database Concepts & Desi. 3 

MAT205 Probability & Statistics 



Second Semester 



3 


CSC460 


Senior Project 


3 


3 


CSC490 


Computer Ethics 


3 


3 


CSC445 


Management Info. Sys. 


3 


3 


CSC487 


Database Programming 


3 


3 


MAR301 


Marketing 


3 


15 






L5 



Minor in Management Information Systems 

Note: Students choosing to minor in Management Information Systems must ensure that all prerequisites necessary 

for the courses listed below are met including mathematics requirements. 

CSC250 Visual Basic Programming 

CSC333 Systems Analysis & Design 

CSC360 Computer Operating Systems 

CSC341 Computer Organization 

CSC375 Networks and Data Communications 

CSC483 Database Concepts and Design 

CSC 445 Management Information Systems 



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Bachelor of Science in 

Mathematics 

The Department of Computer Science, Mathematics, and Technology offers an undergraduate 
program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics. The mission of the 
mathematics program is to produce professionally knowledgeable and well-rounded graduates 
who have a foundation of logical thinking, problem-solving, and decision-making with solid 
analytical skills applicable to any field of study. 

The curriculum of the program covers geometry, college algebra, modern algebra, trigonometry, 
calculus statistics, numerical analysis, ordinary differential equations, and discrete mathematics. 
It also includes computer science, social science and humanities courses in order to produce 
knowledgeable and well-rounded graduates. 

This program is designed to prepare students for advanced study or careers as mathematicians, 
actuaries, mathematical economists, operations researchers, or teachers of mathematics. A 
minimum of 45 credit hours in mathematics above the 100-level is required. 

Program Goals 

The goals of the BS in the Mathematics program are to produce graduates who will have the 
following: 

1. A mature understanding of fundamental mathematical concepts and techniques 

2. The ability to use mathematical models to formulate, analyze and solve real life problems 

3. The ability to communicate mathematical ideas clearly and logically to both specialized 

and general audiences. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Each mathematics graduate will demonstrate the following: 

1. The ability to define fundamental mathematics concepts 

2. The ability to develop mathematical models from real world applications and apply 

problem-solving skills 

3. The ability to perform mathematical research 

4. The ability to prepare technical reports and presentations 

5. The ability to use technology to communicate mathematical concepts both orally and 

verbally. 



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Graduation Requirements 



This degree program requires a minimum of 121 semester hours for completion. 



Freshman 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


MAT 112 


Pre-Cal cuius 




CSC 101 


Intro to Computers 


3 


MAT 113 


College Trigonometry 




REA 101 


Crit Think/Read or 


3 


RI 1 101 


Intro to Religion 




ENG 111 


First Year Lit. 




ENG 102 


College Writing II 




PED 1 10 


Dimen of Wellness 


2 





Social Science Req. 




FMU 101 


University 101 


3 

14 








Sophomore 










First Semester 




Second Se 


mester 




MAT 201 


Calculus 


3 


MAT 202 


Calculus II 


3 


MAT 205 


Statistics 


3 


MAT 210 


Discrete Math I 


3 


CSC 230 


Computer Prog. I 


3 


CSC 330 


Computer Prog. II 


3 




Humanities Req 


3 




Social Science Req. 


3 


COM 103 


Intro to Pub Spk 


3_ 
15 





Afri American Hist. 


3 
15 


Junior 












First Semester 




Second Semester 





MAT 301 Calculus III 
MAT 350 Linear Algebra I 
Nat Science Req 

Nat Science Req Lab 

Foreign Lang Req 

Approved Math Elec. 



3 


MAT 302 


Multi-Vari Calculus 


3 


3 


MAT 351 


Linear Algebra II 


3 


3 




Nat Science Req 


3 


1 





Nat Scie Req Lab 


1 


3 





Foreign Lang Req 


3 


3 


CSC 405 


Prog Language 


3 


lb 






16 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



Senior 

First Semester 

MAT 309 Intro to Mod Alge 
MAT 410 Differential Equa 
MAT 450 Senior Project in Math 
MAT 402 Advanced Calculus 
Approved Math Elec. 



Second Semester 



3 MAT 406 


Complex Vari 


3 


3 


Approved Math Elec. 


3 


3 


Approved Math Elec. 


3 


3 


Approved Math Elec. 


3 


3 


Approved Math Elec. 


3 


15 




15 



APPROVED MATH ELECTIVES 

MAT 200 Applied Calculus 

MAT 211 Discrete Mathematics II 

MAT 303 History of Mathematics 

MAT 305 University Geometry 

MAT 307 Number Theory 

MAT 403 Real Analysis 

MAT 404 Topology 

MAT 405 Vector Calculus 

MAT 411 Numerical Analysis I 

MAT 412 Numerical Analysis II 



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MAT 414 Probability Theory 
MAT 420 Directed Reading I 
MAT 421 Directed Reading II 

In addition, mathematics majors must complete the departmental requirement of one year of 
natural science courses (with labs). 

Minor in Mathematics 

A minor in mathematics consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours in mathematics beyond the 
100-level. A grade of C or better must be earned in each course. Courses that for the minor must 
be selected from the list of core and elective mathematics courses in consultation with the 
mathematics advisor. 

Department of health and natural sciences 

The Department of Health and Natural Sciences offers majors in Biology, Chemistry, 
Environmental Studies, and Physics, concentrations in Radiobiology and Radiochemistry, and 
participates in a dual-degree program in Engineering with Florida International University and 
dual degree programs in Nursing with the University of Miami and Florida International 
University. 

Mission of the Department 

The Department's undergraduate program is broadly inclusive to meet the academic needs of 
national and international students. The department offers programs that lead to baccalaureate 
degrees in biology, chemistry, environmental studies, physics, medical technology and; offers 
pre-professional programs in engineering, through support courses in physics; and, through 
collaborations with other institutions, offers dual degree programs leading to a Bachelor of 
Science in engineering, and two Bachelor of Science degrees, one in Biology and the other in 
Nursing (awarded from the partnering institute). 

The Department of Health and Natural Sciences provides a challenging and supportive 
environment that prepares its students for responsible participation and leadership in an ever- 
changing technologically advanced global society. 

The Department's primary responsibility is to meet the needs of students in the fields of natural 
and life sciences. This responsibility is accomplished through teaching, community service, and 
scholarly activities. 

Goals of the Department 

The Department of Health and Natural Sciences offers baccalaureate degrees in the Health and 
Natural Sciences, which serve a multi-cultural student body. The Department prepares students 
for graduate and professional schools and for careers in scientific and health related fields. The 

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Department provides technical, content courses in the natural sciences for science education 
students, as well as courses for the general education core curriculum. The Department's 
curriculum and educational support systems ensure that every graduate has skills in the 
following areas: 

• Electronic communication 

• Disciplinary applications of technology 

• Critical thinking and analysis 

• Intellectual, cultural, and spiritual development. 

The Department promotes and stimulates faculty development, and faculty, staff, and student 
collegiality, and maintains high standards of scholarship, character, and integrity. 

The Department discharges its responsibilities with integrity, civility, and sensitivity, while 
promoting dignity and respect for others. 

Degree Requirements 

To be certified for graduation in the Department of Health and Natural Sciences students must 
meet the following requirements: 

1. Complete a minimum of 121 credit hours, including all general education requirements, 
with a minimum cumulative G.P.A. of 2.5, 

2. Earn a grade of "C" or better in all major courses 

3. Take the departmental exit examination. Earn a grade of "C" (2.0 grade quality points) 
or better in all science and mathematics courses required for graduation. 

4. Earn grades of "C" (2.0) or better in all science, mathematics and physics courses taken, 
regardless of (science) major. 

Credits in MAT 110, 114 BIO 101, or PSC 101, or any lower level remediation course cannot be applied 
toivard graduation credit in any major offered by the School. 

Bachelor of Science in 

BIOLOGY 

The mission of the Bachelor of Science degree program in Biology is to produce students with 
sound and rigorous training in the biological sciences so that they will be successful graduates 
in professional/graduate school or the workforce. The program emphasizes hands-on learning 
for students and active research with opportunities for students to work under the expert 
guidance of its faculty. 



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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Program Goals 

Graduates of the BS Program in Biology will 

• be knowledgeable enough in their field to seek employment or admission to 
graduate/professional school 

• have research and communications skills to function in a professional setting. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Graduates of the BA program in Biology should be able to 

• Apply basic biological processes and principles, and integrate different areas of biology 

• Develop an emphasis in one or more areas 

• Apply qualitative and quantitative methods to evaluate and interpret evidence 

• Communicate biological concepts effectively in oral, visual, and written presentations. 

Graduation Requirements 

This degree program requires at least 121 semester hours for completion. 



Freshman 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


BIO 130 


Prin of Biology I 


3 


BIO 132 


Prin of Biology II 


3 


BIO 131 


Prin of Bio I Lab 


I 


BIO 133 


Prin of Bio II Lab 


1 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 


MAT 112 


Pre-Calculus 


3 


REA101 


Crit Think/ Read or 


3 


REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


3 


ENG 111 


First Year Literature 




HIS 103 


Afri Amer Hist 


3 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3 
lb 






16 


Sophomore 










First Seme 


ster 




Second Semester 




COM 103 


Intro Pub Speak 


3 


csc_ 


Comp Sci Elect 


3 


MAT 113 


College Trig 


3 


MAT 205 


Prob & Stat 


3 


BIO 204 


General Zoology 


3 


BIO 206 


General Botany 


3 


BIO 205 


General Zoo Lab 


1 


BIO 207 


Gen Botany Lab 


I 


CHE 110 


General Chem I 


4 


CHE 112 


Gen Chem II 


4 


CHE 111 


Gen Chem I Lab 


1 


CHE 113 


Gen Chem II Lab 


1 


PED110 


Dim of Wellness 


2 
IS 






17 


Junior 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




BIO300 


Human Phys 


3 


BIO 320 


Ecology 


3 


BIO 301 


Human Phys Lab 


1 


BIO 321 


Ecology Lab 


1 


CHE 210 


Organic Chem I 


3 


CHE 212 


Organ Chem II 


3 


CHE 211 


Org Chem I Lab 


I 


CHE 213 


Org Chem II Lab 


1 


201 


Foreign Lang Req I 


3 


202 


Foreign Lang Req II 


3 


BIO 310 


Genetics 


3 




Humanities Req 


3 


BIO 311 


Genetics Lab 


I 
15 






14 



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Florida Memorial University 
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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Senior 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




BIO 410 


Microbiology 


3 




Approved Elect 


3 


BIO 411 


Microbiology Lab 


1 


BIO 420 


Cell Biology 


3 


PHY 200 


College Physics I 


3 


BIO 421 


Cell Biology Lab 


1 


PHY 201 


College Phy I Lab 


1 


PHY 202 


Coll Physics II 


3 




History/Govt Req 


3 


PHY 203 


Coll Phys II Lab 


1 


NSC 453 


Senior Project 


3 

14 





Soc Science Req 


3 
14 



Approved Electives 



BIO 211 


Radiation Biology 


3 


BIO 212 


Human Anatomy 


3 


BIO 213 


Human Anatomy Lab 


1 


BIO 304 


Embryology 


3 


BIO 305 


Embryology Lab 


1 


BIO 330 


Parasitology 


3 


BIO 331 


Parasitology Lab 


1 


BIO 400 


Evolution 


3 


BIO 430 


Immunology 


3 


BIO 431 


Immunology Lab 


1 


CHE 214 


Quantitative Analysis 


3 


CHI 215 


Quantitative Analysis Lab 


1 


CHE 430 


Biochemistry 


3 


CHE 431 


Biochemistry Lab 


1 


ENV301 


Wetland Ecology 


3 


ENV 302 


Wetland Ecology Lab 


1 


ENV 304 


Population Studies 


3 


ENV 331 


Urban Ecology 


3 


ENV 332 


Urban Ecology Lab 


I 


ENV 401 


Ecology of SE Florida 


3 


ENV 402 


Ecology of SE Florida Lab 


I 


MAT 200 


Applied Calculus 


3 


MAT 201 


Calculus I 


3 


MAT 202 


Calculus II 


3 


PHY 320 


Thermodynamics 


3 



Students must complete all of the general education requirements and the required credits in 
chemistry, mathematics, and physics. Students intending to go to graduate or medical school 
should consult with their advisors for further information about necessary courses. Students 
intending to teach biology in the secondary schools must also meet certification requirements 
and must consult with the School of Education. 

Biology/Pre-Nursing Dual Degree Program 

(Jointly offered with Florida International University and University of Miami) 



Currently Florida Memorial University does not have a standalone Nursing Program. Students 
cannot declare themselves Biology /Pre-nursing majors without being officially accepted into the 
program. In order to be officially accepted into the program students must fill out an 

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Florida Memorial University 

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application first. Students will then receive an official letter saying whether they have been 
accepted into the program. 

Students must apply for admission to be in the Biology/Pre-Nursing program. Once students 
have applied and have been accepted into the program they must meet with the Biology Pre- 
Nursing Coordinator each semester. International students can apply to the program; however, 
any financial benefits available at the participating nursing school are not available to students. 
International smdents will be expected to pay their way in the program. This program is 
competitive — only the top 5 students transferring each semester to the participating nursing 
school will receive any of the benefits associated with the program. All other students will have 
to compete with other incoming students into the nursing school (FIU or UM). 

Students who do not complete the two years at the Florida International University will be 
given the opportunity to complete a degree in Biology at Florida Memorial University. 

To be immediately eligible for this program, all students must meet the following requirements 
in order to apply: 

1 . High school or college transfer GPA of 3.0 or higher. 

2. SAT score of 1000 or higher or ACT score of 21 or higher. If the student has not taken 
either exam, he/she must take the College Placement Test (CPT). The student will not be 
eligible to apply to the Biology /Pre-nursing program until he/she has completed all 
remedial classes with a satisfactory grade (A - B). 

3. No remedial/developmental courses. This requirement maybe waived if grades are a B 
or higher. If the student is a freshman, he/she cannot apply to the Biology /Pre-nursing 
program until after he/she has taken all remedial courses and passed them (B or higher). 

4. If transferring, the student cannot apply if there are multiple repeats of (science and 
mathematics) classes. If there is only one repeat, it may be waived if it does not count 
toward the prerequisite classes for the pre-nursing program. Any transfer student 
accepted into the Biology/Pre-nursing program must maintain the GPA requirement 
each semester to stay in the program. The GPA requirement is dependent on the nursing 
school of choice (FIU is 3.0 or higher and UM is 3.3 or higher). 

Florida International University Joint Program 

(Bachelor's degree in Biology from FMU and a Bachelor's degree from Florida International 
University in Nursing) 

The Department of Health and Natural Sciences, in partnership with Florida International 
University's College of Nursing and Health Sciences offers a bachelor's degree program in 
nursing or a joint bachelor's degree program in biology and nursing. 

To remain in the dual-degree program, students must earn a "C" or better in all college level 
courses including the major courses (biology, mathematics, chemistry, and physics) (see course 

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Florida Memorial University 

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requirements for the Biology-Pre-Nursing degree). Students in this dual-degree program cannot 
repeat/retake pre-requisite classes. Given that this dual-degree program is an Honors Biology 
program, students must maintain a 3.0 GPA every semester. 

Students completing the dual degree program of study at both institutions, as outlined below, 
will receive a Bachelor of Science in Biology from Florida Memorial University and a Bachelor 
of Science in Nursing from Florida International University. To be eligible to transfer to Florida 
International University students that are participating in this program must meet the following 
criteria. 

The requirements, generated by FIU's Nursing Program, with Florida Memorial's acceptance, 
are: 

1. A GPA of 3.00 on all prior college work, including pre-requisite courses. 

2. No repeats related to academic failure of pre-requisite science and science lab courses 
(anatomy & lab, physiology & lab, microbiology & lab, chemistry & lab). Students must 
have a minimum of C (a C- is not accepted) on all pre-requisite science courses. 

3. A score of 80% or higher on the HESI Exam. 

4. Take and pass Florida International University's Introduction to Nursing class (NUR 
3017) before transfer. 

5. Complete the application and essay of professional goals for the Nursing Program. 

6. Complete the application for admission to Florida International University. 

Students will be required to complete a criminal background check, complete all health 
requirements, complete CPR certification, and have personal health insurance. 

Effective with the class of January, 2006, students are ranked using a point system that gives 
differentiated points for GPA, Science/Mathematics GPA, HESI Exam, and other student 
characteristics, such as having a prior baccalaureate degree, having entered FIU as a freshman 
or sophomore. 

There are three options under the FIU agreement. These are the 2+2 (Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing), 3+2 (Bachelor of Science Degrees in Biology and Nursing), and the 2+2+1 (Bachelor of 
Science Degrees in Biology and Nursing). 

Florida Memorial University (Nursing Preparation) and Florida 
International University School of Nursing Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
(Two+Two) 

Freshman 

First Semester Second Semester 

FMU 101 University 101 3 ENG 102 College Writing II 3 

ENG 101 College Writing I 3 SSC 302 Statistics 3 

MAT 113 College Trigonometry 3 CHE 110 General Chemistry I 4 

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Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



HIS 200 History of the USA" 3 CHE 1 1 1 

BIO 212 Human Anatomy 3 PSY 200 

BIO 213 Human Anatomy Lab 1 REL 201 

16 



General. Chemistry I Lab 1 
Intro to Psychology 3 

Intro to Philosophy** 3 

17 



Sophomore 
First Semester 

CHE 112 General Chemistry II 
CHE 113 General Chemistry II Lab 
SOC 402 Racial & Cultural Groups3 
PSY 306 Growth & Development 

(only in fall) 
BIO 300 Human Physiology 
BIO 301 Human Physiology Lab 
Foreign Language Req. I* 



Second Semester 

4 NUT 200 Nutrition 3 

1 (only in Spring, can take HED221 
Nutritional Health) 



3 REL 202 



3 

1 

3 
17 



BIO 410 
BIO 411 



Philosophy of Religion 
Humanities Req. 
Microbiology 
Microbiology Lab 
Foreign Language Req IP 



3 
3 

1 

3 
16 



^Foreign Language: Any two (2) semesters of Foreign Language of your choice (e.g. Spanish, 
French, etc.) or High School Transcript proving two years of the same foreign language were 
completed or completion of a foreign language CLEP exam. See FIU catalog at www.fiu.edu for 
additional information. Florida Memorial University does require a Foreign Language class. 
You must see coordinator/advisor to discuss options available. 

** Writing-intensive course 

Dual Degree Program 

Bachelor of Science Degrees in Biology and Nursing 

3+2 



First Year 




First Semester 


FMU 101 


University 101 


ENG 101 


College Writing I 


MAT 113 


College Trigonometry 


HIS 103 


African American History 


BIO 130 


Principles of Biology 


BIO 131 


Principles of Biology Lab 


Second Year 


First Semester 


CHE 110 


General Chemistry I 


CHE 111 


General Chemistry I Lab 


SOC 402 


Racial and Cultural Groups 


BIO 212 


Human Anat 


BIO 213 


Human Anat Lab 


PSY 306 


Growth & Development 




(Fall only) 


201 


Foreign Language Req*I 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
16 



Second Semester 

ENG 102 College Writing II 
SSC 302 Statistics 
REL 201 Intro to Philosophy** 
HIS 200 History of the USA** 
PSY 200 Intro to Psychology 



Second Semester 

CHE 112 
CHE 113 

BIO 300 
BIO 301 
NUT 200 



General Chemistry II 
General Chemistry II Lab 
Humanities Requirement 
Human Physiology 
Human Physiology Lab 
Nutrition 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



202 Foreign Language Req*II 
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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



18 



18 



Third Year 
First Semester 

BIO 310 Genetics 3 

BIO 311 Genetics Lab 1 

CHE 210 Organic Chemistry I 3 

CHE 211 Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 

PHY 200 College Physics I 3 

PHY 201 College Physics I Lab 1 

REL202 Philosophy of Religion 3 

15 



Second Semester 

PHY 202 College Physics II 3 

PHY 203 College Physics II Lab 1 

CHE 212 Organic Chemistry II 3 

CHE 213 Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 

BIO 410 Microbiology 3 

BIO 411 Microbiology Lab 1 

BIO 420 Cell Biology 3 

BIO 421 Cell Biology Lab 1 

16 



Total Credits = 95 (FMU) + 76 (FIU) = 171 

^Foreign Language: Any two (2) semesters of Foreign Language (e.g. Spanish, French, etc.) or 
High School Transcript proving two years of the same foreign language were completed. 

** Writing-intensive course 

Bachelor of Science Degrees in Biology and Nursing 

2+2+1 



First Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




FMU 101 


University 101 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


SSC 302 


Statistics 


3 


MAT 113 


College Trigonometry 


3 


CHE 110 


General Chemistry I 


4 


HIS 200 


History of the USA** 
(Writing) 


3 


CHE 111 


General Chemistry I Lab 


1 


BIO 130 


Principles of Biology 


3 


PSY 200 


Intro to Psychology 


3 


BIO 131 


Principles of Biology Lab 


1 


BIO 212 


Human Anat 


3 








BIO 213 


Human Anat Lab 


1 






16 






18 



Second Year 
First Semester 

CHE 112 General Chemistry II 4 

CHE 113 General Chemistry II Lab 1 

SOC 402 Racial & Cultural Groups 3 

BIO 300 Human Physiology 3 

BIO 301 Human Physiology Lab 1 

Foreign Language Req* 3 

PSY 306 Develop Psychology 3 

18 



Second Semester 

REL201 Intro to Philosophy** 

Humanities Req. 

BIO 410 Microbiology 

BIO 4 1 1 Microbiology Lab 

Foreign Language Req* 

NUT 200 Nutrition 



3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 

16 



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Florida Memorial University 

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^Foreign Language Any two (2) semesters of Foreign Language of your choice (e.g. Spanish, 
French, American Sign Language) or High School Transcript proving two years of the same 
foreign language were completed. See FIU catalog at www.fiu.edu for additional information. 

** Writing-intensive course 

Total Credits (first three years) - 68 



Last Year at FMU 










Fifth Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




BIO 310 


Genetics 


3 


PHY 202 


College Physics II 


3 


BIO 311 


Genetics Lab 


1 


PHY 203 


College Physics II Lab 


1 


CHE 210 


Organic Chemistry I 


3 


CHE 212 


Organic Chemistry II 


3 


CHE 211 


Organic Chem I Lab 


1 


CHE 213 


Organic Chemistry II Lab 


1 


PHY 200 


College Physics I 


3 


BIO 420 


Cell Biology 


3 


PHY 201 


College Phys I Lab 


1 


BIO 421 


Cell Biology Lab 


I 


HIS 103 


African American Hist 


3 
15 






i: 



Total Credits = 95 (FMU) + 76 (FIU) = 171 

University of Miami Joint Program 

Bachelor's degree in Biology from FMU and a Bachelor's degree from University of 
Miami in Nursing 

Students must apply for admission to be in the Biology/Pre-Nursing program. Once students 
have applied and have been accepted into the program they must meet with the Biology Pre- 
Nursing Coordinator each semester. International students can apply to the program; however, 
any financial benefits available at the participating nursing school are not available to students. 
International students will be expected to pay their way in the program. 

The Department of Health and Natural Sciences, in partnership with the University of Miami's 
School of Nursing, offers a joint bachelor's degree program in biology and nursing. Students 
completing the program of study at both institutions, as outlined below, will receive a Bachelor 
of Science in Biology from Florida Memorial University and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
from the University of Miami. To be eligible to transfer to the University of Miami's School of 
Nursing, students must earn a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.3 in courses taken at 
Florida Memorial University. 

Students who do not complete the two years at the University of Miami will be given the 
opportunity to complete a degree in Biology at Florida Memorial University. 



105 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-201 3 Under graduate Catalog 



To remain in the dual-degree program, students must earn a "C" or better in all college level 
courses including major courses (biology, mathematics, chemistry, and physics) (see course 
requirements for the Biology-Nursing degree). Given that this dual-degree program is an 
Honors Biology program, students must maintain a 3.3 GPA every semester. Students who 
enter the Nursing program at the University of Miami who have not met these stated 
requirements will not receive a biology degree from Florida Memorial University and are 
ineligible for the tuition reduction at the University of Miami. 



First Year 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


BIO 130 


Prin of Biology 


3 


MAT 113 


College Trig 


3 


BIO 131 


Prin of Bio Lab 


1 


SOC 200 


Intro Sociology 


3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 


HIS 103 


Afri. Amer. Hist 


3 


REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


3 


PSY 200 


Intro to Psychology 


3 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3_ 
16 






1 


Second Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 





CHE 110 
CHE 111 
COM 103 

201 

BIO 212 
BIO 213 
PSY 306 



General Chem I 
Gen Chem I Lab 
Intro Pub Spk 
Foreign Lang Req I 
Hum Anatomy 
Hum Anatomy Lab 
Develop Psychology 



4 
1 
3 
3 
3 
I 
3 

18 



ENG 2 English Elective 

CHE 112 Gen Chem II 

CHE 113 Gen Chem II Lab 

202 Foreign Lang Req II 

BIO 300 Human Physio 

BIO 301 Human Physio Lab 

NUT 200 Nutrition 
(or HED 221 Nutritional Health) 



3 
4 
1 
3 
3 
1 
3 

18 



Third Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




BIO 310 


Genetics 


3 


PHY 202 


College Phy II 


3 


BIO 311 


Genetics Lab 


1 


PHY 203 


Coll Phy II Lab 


1 


CHE 210 


Organic Chem I 


3 


CHE 212 


Org Chem II 


3 


CHE 211 


Org Chem Lab 


1 


CHE 213 


Org Chem II Lab 


1 


PHY 200 


College Physics I 


3 


BIO 410 


Microbiology 


3 


PHY 201 


Coll Phy I Lab 


1 


BIO 411 


Microbiology Lab 


1 


SSC 302 


Intro to Statistics 


3 


BIO 420 


Cell Biology 


3 








BIO 421 


Cell Biology Lab 


I 






15 






16 



Total Credits = 95 (FMU) + 76 (UM) = 171 



106 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Bachelor of Science in 

BIOLOGY (Concentration in Radiobiology) 

The School of Health and Natural Sciences, through support from and collaboration with the 
National Nuclear Security Administration, offers a program leading to the Bachelor of Science 
in Biology with specialization in Radiobiology. This program is designed for students planning 
graduate study in radiobiology and related fields of science or careers in government facilities 
for radiochemistry /nuclear chemistry/nuclear medicine. 

Graduation Requirements 

This degree program requires a minimum of 124 semester hours and two summer internships at 
a government laboratory under the auspices of the Department of Energy (DOE) for completion. 
Students, through the aid of their advisor(s), will seek and obtain the internships during the 
summer after completion of their sophomore year. To participate in the internships, the student 
must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00, with no C-, D, or F in departmental courses. 

Mission 
PROGRAM GOALS 

Graduates of the BS Program in Biology with a concentration in Radiobiology will 

1 . be knowledgeable enough in their field to seek employment or admission to 
graduate/professional school 

2. have research and communications skills to function in a professional setting. 



Student Learning Objectives 

Graduates of the BA program in Biology should be able to 

• Apply basic biological processes and principles, and integrate different areas of biology 

• Develop an emphasis in one or more areas 

• Apply qualitative and quantitative methods to evaluate and interpret evidence 

• Communicate biological concepts effectively in oral, visual, and written presentations. 

Freshman Year 
First Semester 

FMU 101 University 101 
ENG 101 College Writing I 
BIO 130 Princ. of Bio 
BIO 131 Princ. Of Bio Lab 
MAT 112 Pre-Calculus 
CHE 101 Con of Radiochem 
PED110 Dim. of Wellness 

16 14 





Second Semester 




3 


ENG 102 College Writing II 


3 


3 


BIO 132 Princ. of Bio II 


3 


3 


BIO 133 Princ. Of Bio II Lab 


1 


1 


MAT 201 Calculus I 


3 


3 


ENG 101 College Writing II 


3 


1 


BIO 200 Human Anatomy 


3 


2 


BIO 201 Human Anatomy Lab 


1 



107 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Sophomore Year 








First Semester 




Second Semester 




BIO 211 Radiation Bio. 


3 


REA 101 Critical Think. & Read. 


3 


CHE 110 Gen. ChemI 


4 


or 




CHE 111 Gen. Chem. I Lab 


1 


ENG 1 1 1 First Year Lit. 




MAT 205 Prob. & Stats. 


3 


CHE 112 Gen Chem. II 


4 


COM 103 Intro, to Public 


3 


CHE 113 Gen Chem. II Lab 


1 


REL 101 Intro, to Religion 


3 


CSC 101 Intro, to Computer Sci. 


3 






BIO 300 Human Physiology 


3 






BIO 301 Human Physiology Lab 


1 




17 




15 



Summer after Sophomore Year First Internship at a DOE-sponsored laboratory 



Junior Year 

First Semester 

CHE 210 Org. Chem. I 

CHE 211 Org. Chem. I Lab. 

PHY 200 Coll. Physics I 

PHY 201 Coll. Phy. I La. 

Foreign Lang. I 

CHE 230 Intro toRadkxhem 





Second Semester 




3 


CHE 212 Org. Chem. II 


3 


1 


CHE 213 Org. Chem. II Lab. 


1 


3 


PHY 202 Coll. Phyics II 


3 


1 


PHY 203 Coll. Phy. II Lab. 


1 


3 
3 


ForeignLang.il 

BIO 306 Radiopharmacology 
CHE 232 Intro to Radiochem II 


3 

3 

2 


14 




lb 



*Sutnmer after Junior Year Second Internship at a DOE-sponsored laboratory 

Senior Year 
First Semester 

BIO 326 Res. Tech. 
in Rad Bio & Radiopharm 
CHE 350 Prin. Rad. Health 
HIS 103 African Amer His 
BIO 420 Cell Biology 
BIO 421 Cell Biology Lab 
Soc. Science Req. 





Second Semester 






CHE 370 Advan. Radiochem. 


3 


1 


CHE 371 Ad. Radioche. Lab. 


I 


3 


CHE 351 Prin. Rad. He. Lab. 


! 


3 


CHE 480 Nuclear Chemistry 


3 


3 


Hist./Gov't. Req. 


3 


1 


Humanities Req. 


3 


3 


NSC 453 Senior Project 


3 


15 




16 



BACHELOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

The School of Health and Natural Sciences offers programs leading to the Bachelor of Science in 
Chemistry and the Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry. The Bachelor of Science program is designed 
for students planning graduate study in chemistry and related fields of science or careers as 
professional chemists. The Bachelor of Arts degree program provides the flexibility that satisfies 
the objectives of students in Pre-Medicine, Pre-Pharmacy, Pre-Optometry, Pre-Dentistry, other 
allied health fields, and high school education. A grade of 'C or better must be earned in each 
Chemistry course with an overall cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or above. Grades in 
chemistry courses of C- or less cannot be counted toward either chemistry major. Students are 
strongly advised to retake any course with a D, particularly courses in biology, physics, or 
mathematics. 



108 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Bachelor of Arts in 

Chemistry 

Graduation Requirements 

This degree program requires at least 120 semester hours for completion. 



Freshman 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing 11 


3 


CHE 110 


Gen Chem I 


4 


CHE 112 


General Chem II 


4 


CHE 111 


Gen Chem I Lab 


1 


CHE 113 


Gen Chem II Lab 


1 


MAT 201 


Calculus I 


3 


MAT 202 


Calculus II 


3 


REA 101 


Critical Think/Read or 


3 


BIO 130 


Prin of Biology I 


3 


ENG 111 


First Year Literature 




BIO 131 


Prin of Bio I Lab 


1 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3 
17 






15 


Sophomore Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




COM 103 


Intro to Pub Speak 


3 


CSC 


Comp Sci Req 


3 


CHE 210 


Organic Chem I 


3 


CHE 212 


Organic Chem II 


3 


CHE 211 


Organic Chem I Lab 


1 


CHE 213 


Org Chem II Lab 


1 


CHE 214 


Quant Analysis 


3 


CHE 224 


Environ Chem 


3 


CHE 215 


Quant Analysis Lab 


1 


CHE 225 


Env Chem Lab 


1 


BIO 132 


Prin of Biology II 


3 


REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


3 


BIO 133 


Prin of Bio II Lab 


1 






14 



15 



Junior Year 
First Semester 

PED 1 10 Dimensions of Wellness 

201 Foreign Lang Req I 

CHE 340 Survey Phy Chem 
CHE 341 Surv Phy Chem Lab 

PHY 200 College Physics I 
PHY 201 College Physics I Lab 

Elective 



First Semester 

Social Science Req 

Afr Amer His Req 
CHE 430 Biochemistry 
CHE 431 Biochem Lab 

Elective 
Elective 



3 
3 
1 
3 
1 

3 
16 



3 

3 

3 

1 

3 

3_ 

If, 



Second Semester 

MAT 205 Prob & Stat 3 

202 Foreign Lang Req II 3 

BIO 212 Human Anatomy 3 

BIO 213 Human Anatomy Lab 1 

PHY 202 College Physics II 3 

PHY 203 College Phys II Lab 1 

14 

Senior Year 
Second Semester 



CHE 380 Immunochem 
CHE 381 Immuno Lab 

Hist/Govt Req 

Humanities Req 

NSC 453 Senior Project 



3 

1 
3 
3 
3 
13 



NOTE: CHE 100 is a preparatory course 
course will not be used toward a major 



for science majors who may not be ready for CHE 110. This 
in any of the degree programs within the Natural Sciences 



109 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



School (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Engineering partnership with Florida International University, or 
the Nursing partnerships with Florida International University and the University of Miami). 



Bachelor of Science in 

Chemistry 

Mission Statement 

The mission of the Bachelor of Science degree program in Chemistry is to provide to the 
industry and the public qualified and highly trained graduates capable of entering local and 
state employment/institutions of higher learning, as well as teaching chemistry at the high 
school level. In addition, the program will provide instruction for other majors. 

Goals 

Graduates of the BS Program in Chemistry will 

• be knowledgeable enough in their field to seek employment or admission to 
graduate/professional school 

• have research and communications skills to function in a professional setting. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Graduates of the BS program in Chemistry will be able to 

• Demonstrate command of facts, theories, and concepts of chemistry, 

• Function effectively in a laboratory setting by working safely with chemicals and working 

as a team member 

• Perform independent research 

• Use computers and instrumentation effectively 

• Communicate effectively orally and in writing. 

Graduation Requirements 

This degree program requires at least 122 semester hours for completion. 



Freshman 


Year 








First Semester 




Second Semester 




CHE 110 


Gen Chem I 


4 


BIO 130 Prin of Biology 


3 


CHE 111 


Gen Chem I Lab 


1 


BIO 131 Prin of Bio Lab 


1 


ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


MAT 202 Calculus 11 


3 


MAT 201 


Calculus I 


3 


ENG 102 College Writing II 


3 


REA 101 


Crit Think/Read or 


3 


CHE 112 Gen Chem II 


4 


ENG 111 


First Year Lit 




CHE 113 Gen Chem II Lab 


1 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3_ 







17 15 

110 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Sophomore Year 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



COM 103 


Intro to Pub Spk 


3 


CSC Comp Sci Elect 


3 


CHE 210 


Organ Chem I 


3 


CHE 212 Org Chem II 


3 


CHE 211 


Org Chem Lab I 


1 


CHE 213 Org Chem Lab II 


1 


CHE 214 


Quant Analysis 


3 


CHE 224 Environ Chem 


3 


CHE 215 


Quant Analysis Lab 


1 


CHE 225 Env Chem Lab 


1 


MAT 301 


Calculus III 


3 


REL 101 Intro to Religion 


3 


PED110 


Dim of Well 


2 
lb 


MAT 302 Multivari Calc 


3 
17 


Junior Year 








First Semester 




Second Semester 






Social Science Req 


3 


202 Foreign Lang Req II 


3 


201 


Foreign Lang Req I 


3 


CHE 362 Physical Chem II 


3 


CHE 360 


Physical Chem I 


3 


CHE 363 Physical Chem Lab II 


1 


CHE 361 


Physical Chem Lab I 


I 


PHY 252 Physics w/Cal 11 


4 


PHY 250 


Physics w/Cal I 


4 


PHY 253 Physics w/Cal Lab II 


1 


PHY 251 


Physics w/Calc Lab I 


1 
15 


MAT 205 Prob & Stats 


3 
15 


Senior Yea 


r 








First Semester 




Second Semester 





CHE 460 Adv Inorg Chem 
CHE 461 Adv Inorg Che Lab 

Afr-Am Hist Req 
CHE 430 Biochemistry 
CHE 431 Biochem Lab 
SSC Social Science Req 



3 

1 

3 
3 
I 

3 
13 



CHE 380 Immunochemist 

CHE 381 Immunochem Lb 

HIS History/Gov't El 

Humanities Elect 

NSC 453 Senior Project 



3 
I 

3 
3 
3 

14 



Approved Electives for B.S. in Chemistry 

BIO 212 Human Anatomy & Physiology 

BIO 213 Human Anatomy & Physiology Lab 

CHE 230 Introduction to Radiochemistry 

CHE 231 Introduction to Radiochemistry Lab I 

CHE 232 Introduction to Radiochemistry Lab II 

CHE 250 Radioactive Waste Management 

CHE 350 Principles of Radiological Health 

CHE 351 Principles of Radiological Health Lab 

CHE 370 Advanced Radiochemistry 

CHE 371 Advanced Radiochemistry Lab 

CHE 410 Instrumental Analysis 

CHE 41 1 Instrumental Analysis Lab 

CHE 480 Special Topics in Nuclear Chemistry 

ENV 331 Urban Ecology 

ENV 332 Urban Ecology Lab 

ENV 381 Air Resources 

ENV 382 Water Resources 

ENV 384 Energy Resources 

PHY 310 Modern Physics I 

PHY 31 1 Modern Physics Lab I 

PHY 3 1 2 Modern Physics II 



111 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



PHY 313 Modern Physics Lab II 

PHY 318 Optics 

PHY 320 Thermodynamics 

Bachelor of Arts in 

CHEMISTRY (Concentration in Radiochemistry) 

The School of Health and Natural Sciences, through support from and collaboration with the 
National Nuclear Security Administration, offers a program leading to the Bachelor of Arts in 
Chemistry with a concentration in radiochemistry. This program is designed for students 
planning graduate study in radiochemistry/nuclear chemistry and related fields of science or 
careers in government facilities for radiochemistry/nuclear chemistry. 

Graduation Requirements 

This degree program requires at least 122 semester hours and two summer internships at a 
government laboratory under the auspices of the Department of Energy (DOE) for completion. 
Students, through the aid of their advisor(s), will seek and obtain the internships during the 
summer after completion of their sophomore year. To participate in the internships, as well as 
be admitted into this program, the student must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.00/4.00 
throughout his/her tenure at Florida Memorial University, with no C-, D, or F in any class from 
the curriculum. 

Program Goals 

Graduates of the BS Program in Chemistry with a concentration in Radiochemistry will 

• be knowledgeable enough in their field to seek employment or admission to 
graduate/professional school 

• have research and communications skills to function in a professional setting. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Graduates of the BA program in Chemistry with a concentration in Radiochemistry should be 
able to 

• Demonstrate command of facts, theories, and concepts of chemistry and nuclear science 

• Function effectively in a laboratory setting by working safely with chemicals and 
radioactive substances and by working as a team member 

• Perform independent research 

• Use computers and instrumentation effectively 

• Communicate effectively orally and in writing. 



112 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Freshman Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


CHE 110 


Gen Chem I 


4 


CHE 112 


General Chem II 


4 


CHE 111 


Gen Chem I Lab 


1 


CHE 113 


Gen Chem II Lab 


1 


MAT 201 


Calculus I 


3 


MAT 202 


Calculus II 


3 


REA 101 


Critical Think/Read or 


3 


CHE 101 


Cncpts. Nucl.Sci. 


1 


ENG 111 


First Year Literature 




COM 103 


Intro to Pub. Spk 


3 


FMU101 


University lOlinar 


3 

15 






1 


Sophomore Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




PHY 200 


Coll. Physics I 


3 


CSC 


Comp Sci. Req. 


3 


CHE 210 


Organic Chem I 


3 


CHE 212 


Organic Chem II 


3 


CHE 211 


Organic Chem I Lab 


i 


CHE 213 


Org Chem II Lab 


1 


CHE 214 


Quant Analysis 


3 


PHY 202 


Coll. Physics II 


3 


CHE 215 


Quant Analysis Lab 


1 


PHY 203 


Coll. Phy. II Lab 


1 


PHY 201 


Coll. Phy. I Lab 


I 


REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


3 


PED110 


Dim of Wellness 


2 
14 






1 



Summer after Sophomore Year First Internship at a DOE-sponsored laboratory 



Junior Year 
First Semester 



Second Semester 





Social Sciences Req 
Foreign Lang Req I 
Survey Phy Chem 


3 
3 
3 


MAT 205 
CHE 350 


Prob & Stat 
Foreign Lang Req II 
Prin. Rad. Health 


3 


CHE 340 


3 
3 


CHE 341 


Surv Phy Chem Lab 


1 


CHE 351 


Prin. Rad. He. Lab 


1 


CHE 230 


Intro Radiochemistry 


3 


CHE 232 


Intr. Rdchm. II 


2 


CHE 231 
CHE 250 


College Physics I Lab 
Radio. Wst. Mng. 


1 
3 

17 





Elective 


3 

1 



Summer after Junior Year Second Internship at a DOE-sponsored laboratory 



Senior Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




CHE 370 


Advan. Radiochem. 


3 


CHE 380 


Immunochem 


3 


CHE 371 


Ad. Radiochem. Lab 


1 


CHE 381 


Immuno Lab 


1 


CHE 430 
CHE 431 


Biochemistry 
Biochem Lab 
Elective 


3 

1 
3 


NSC 453 


Hist/Govt Req 
Humanities Req 
Senior Project* 


3 

3 
3 





Afr. Amer His Req 


3. 
14 


CHE 480 


Nuclear Chemistry 


3 
16 



In Nuclear Chemistry 



113 



Florida Manorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Bachelor of Science in 

Environmental Studies 

The mission of the Environmental Studies program is to produce well-rounded environmental 
scientists who may be employed in the field or pursue graduate studies, and to provide general 
education students with a solid foundation in environmental concepts and their 
multidisciplinary application to the relationship of humans to the natural world. 

Program Goals 

Graduates of the BS Program in Environmental Studies will 

• Be knowledgeable enough in their field to seek employment or admission to 
graduate/professional school 

• have research and communications skills to function in a professional setting. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Graduates of the Environmental Studies program will be able 

• To apply ecological concepts to global environmental problems 

• To assess the various types of natural resources 

• To demonstrate core knowledge of the physical and ecological sciences and 

• To integrate the policy, economic, social, and values implications of environmental 
management. 

Successful general education students will be able 

• To demonstrate a working knowledge of the fundamental concepts of the physical and 
ecological sciences 

• To assess the types of natural resources 

• To evaluate global environmental problems through the application of scientific 
principles 

• To relate their lives and careers to the principles of sustainability. 

The School of Health and Natural Sciences offers a program leading to the Bachelor of Science 
degree in Environmental Science. Students must complete the ENV Core Curriculum and three 
of the four resource courses and at least one course and lab from the approved environmental 
science electives. A grade of "C" or better must be earned in each ENV course, with an overall 
cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or above. 

Graduation Requirements 

This degree program requires a minimum of 121 semester hours for completion. 



114 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Freshman Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


BIO 130 


Prin of Biology 


3 


BIO204/206 


General Zoology/Botany 


3 


BIO 131 


Prin of Bio Lab 


1 


BIO205/207 


General Zoo Lab/Bot Lab 


I 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 


MAT 112 


Pre-Calculus 


3 


REA 101 


Crit Think & Read or 


3 


HIS 


African Amer. Hist. 


3 


ENG 111 


First Year Lit 




CSC 


Computer Sci Req 


3 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3 

lb 






lb 


Sophomore Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




CHE 110 


General Chem I 


4 


BIO 320 


General Ecology 


3 


CHE 111 


General Chem Lab I 


I 


BIO 321 


General Ecology 


1 


COM 103 


Intro Pub Speak 


3 


CHE 112 


General Chem II 


4 


ENV101 


Intro to Env Sci 


3 


CHE 113 


General Chem Lab 


1 


MAT 205 


Statistics 


3 


PSY 200 


Intro to Psychology 


3 


201 


Foreign Lang Req I 


3 


202 


Foreign Lang Req II 


3 








PED110 


Dim of Wellness 


2 






17 






17 


Junior Yeai 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




CHE 214 


Quant Analysis 


3 


REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


3 


CHE 215 


Quant Anal Lab 


1 




Humanities Requirement 


3 


ENV 


Resource I 


3 


ENV 331 


Urban Ecology 


3 


ENV 


Resource II 


3 


ENV 332 


Urban Ecol Lab 


1 




Social Science Req 


3 


ENV 362 


Spirit and Nature 


3 








ENV 


Resource III 


3 






13 






lb 



Second Semester 



Senior Year 
First Semester 

ECO 485 Environ Economics 3 ENV 451 

ENV 450 Field Stud Env Studies 3 

ENV 461 South FL Ecology 3 

ENV 462 South FL Ecology Lab 1 

ENV 471 US Environment Policy 3 

13 



Senior Seminar 
BIO/CHE/ENV elective 
BIO/CHE/ENV/elective lab 
History/Govt. Requirement 
Elective 



3 
3 
1 
3 
3 
13 



Students must complete all of the general education requirements. Students intending to go to graduate school 
should consult with their advisor for further information on required courses. 

Bachelor of Arts in 

PHYSICS 

The School of Health and Natural Sciences offers a program leading to the Bachelor of Arts in 
Physics. This program is recommended for students who are planning to continue in graduate 
and professional schools or to work in educational and research institutions, as well as in 
industry. 



115 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Mission 

The mission of the Bachelor of Arts degree program in Physics is to provide students with 
working knowledge of the physical laws that govern the universe. The program provides broad 
training for graduate work and/or future technical, industrial or research careers in the physical 
sciences or related fields. Given that this program is one degree in a dual degree program based 
on the partnership between Florida Memorial University and the School of Engineering at 
Florida International University, both degrees (Bachelor of Arts in Physics and Bachelor of 
Engineering) can provide basic training for students who wish to enter graduate school, the 
engineering work force, or teach high school physics. 

Program Goals 

Graduates of the BA program in Physics will 

• be knowledgeable enough in their field to seek employment or admission to 
graduate/professional school 

• have research and communications skills to function in a professional setting. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Graduates of the BA program in Physics should: 

• Demonstrate knowledge of physical principles used to model natural phenomena 

• Demonstrate ability to communicate physical concepts with mathematical expressions, 
and effectively derive quantitative predictions from a model through mathematical 
analysis 

• Demonstrate understanding of scientific methodology, including 

o data collection from observations, setting up laboratory experiments and data 

collection from experiments 
o analysis of data 
o testing of a model or hypothesis by comparing with data 

• Demonstrate competency in using computer tools, including 

o software programs for data analysis and presentation 
o numerical analysis 
o computer simulations. 

Graduation Requirements 

This degree program requires 123 semester credit hours for completion. A grade of C or better is 

required in each core course, with an overall cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or above. 

Freshman Year 

First Semester Second Semester 

CHE110 General Chemistry I 4 PHY250 Physics w/Cal I 4 

CHE111 General Chemistry I 1 PHY251 Physics w/Cal I Lab 1 

Lab MAT202 Calculus II 3 

116 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



ENG101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG102 


College Writing II 


4 


MAT201 


Calculus I 


3 


CHE112 


General Chemistry II 


4 


FMU101 


University lOlinar 


3 


CHE113 


General Chem II Lab 


1 


REA101 


College Reading or 










ENG 111 


First Year Lit 


3 

17 






lb 


Sophomore Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




COM103 


Intro to Public Spkg 


3 


CSC373 


C++Programming 


3 


PHY252 


Physics w/Cal II 


4 




Foreign Language I 


3 


PETY253 


Physics w/ Cal II Lab 


1 


HUM_ 


Humanities 


3 


CSC232 


Intro. To Program. 


3 


PFTY310 


Modern Physics I 


3 


MAT301 


Calculus III 


3 


PHY311 


Modern Physics I Lab 


1 


PED110 


Dim of Wellness 


2 
17 


MAT205 


Probability & Stat. 


3 
16 



Junior Year 
First Semester 

Social Sciences Req. 

Foreign Language II 

PHY312 Modern Physics II 
PHY313 Modern Physics II 

Lab 
MAT302 Multi-variable Cal. 
HIS African Amer Hist 



3 
3 
3 
1 

3 
3 
16 



Second Semester 

MAT401 Differential Equations 
PHY320 Thermodynamics 
PHY410 Mechanics I 
PHY440 Electromagnetism I 
REL 201 Intro to Philosophy 



15 



Senior Year 
First Semester 

PHY411 Mechanics II 
PHY441 Electromagnetism II 
PHY470 Senior Physics Lab 
PHY460 Quantum Mechanics I 
History /Govt Req. 



Second Semester 



3 


PHY461 


Quantum Mechanics II 3 


3 


NSC453 


Senior Project 3 


2 


PHY462 


Statistical Physics 3 


3 
3 
14 





Approved Elective 3 
Solid State Physics 3 
15 



Approved Electives for the Bachelor of Arts in Physics 



AST 200 


Stellar Astronomy 


3 


CHE 210 


Organic Chemistry I 


3 


CHE 211 


Organic Chemistry I Lab 


1 


CHE 212 


Organic Chemistry II 


3 


CHE 213 


Organic Chemistry II Lab 


1 


CHE 350 


Principles of Radio Health 


3 


CHE 351 


Prin Radio Health Lab 


1 


CHE 360 


Physical Chemistry I 


3 


CHE 361 


Physical Chemistry I Lab 


1 


CHE 362 


Physical Chemistry II 


3 


CHE 363 


Physical Chemistry II Lab 


I 


CHE 370 


Advanced Radiochemistry 


3 


CHE 371 


Adv Radiochemistry Lab 


1 



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Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



CHE 430 


Biochemistry 


3 


CHE 431 


Biochemistry Lab I 


1 


CHE 480 


Spec Topics Nuclear Chem 


3 


ENV 384 


Energy Resources 


3 


PHY 497 


Special Relativity 


3 


PHY 498 


General Relativity 


3 



Dual Degree 

Physics-Engineering Program 

(offered jointly with Florida International University) 

Florida Memorial University offers part of a five-year integrated Dual Degree Engineering 
program in cooperation with Florida International University. Students attend Florida 
Memorial University for 3 years and then attend the Engineering School at Florida International 
University for 2 years. Students enrolled in this program will receive a Bachelor of Science 
degree in Physics (Florida Memorial University) simultaneously with an appropriate 
engineering degree (a Bachelor of Science) from FIU. These degrees awarded by the College of 
Engineering from Florida International University include Civil and Environmental 
Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Industrial and Systems 
Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Bio-Engineering. 

Graduation Requirements 



The Engineering and Applied Physics degrees will be awarded only upon the successful 
completion of prescribed work at both institutions. In order to matriculate successfully at 
Florida International University, a qualified student (1) must have completed Florida Memorial 
University's program requirements, (2) must have a cumulative G.P.A. of 2.5 or higher and a 
grade of "C" or better in all courses, and (3) must be recommended by the program director at 
Florida Memorial University. 

Dual Degree engineering students meeting these qualifications will be admitted as full-time 
engineering students at Florida International University with full junior standing, or be 
concurrently enrolled at Florida International University. Students should select their intended 
field of study in their first year so that they enroll in appropriate engineering and science 
preparatory courses. 

Freshman Year 
First Semester 
ENG101* College Writing I 
CSC232 Intro to Programming 
CHE110 General Chemistry I** 
CHE111 General Chemistry I Lab 
MAT201 Calculus I 
Art or Music Appr. 





Second Semester 




3 


HUM_ 


Humanities w/writing I 


3 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


4 


ssc 


Social Sciences I (Found. 


)3 


1 


PHY250 


Physics w/Cal. I 


4 


3 


PHY251 


Physics w/Cal. II Lab 


1 


3 


MAT202 


Calculus II 


3 



17 



17 



118 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Under graduate Catalog 



Sophomore Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 






ssc 


Social Sciences II (Tech. J 


3 


HUM 


Humanities II 


3 




PEG201 


Auto CAD 


3 


MAT302 


Multivariable Calculus 


3 




PEG331 


Statics 


3 


PHY310 


Modern Physics I 


3 




PHY252 


Physics w/Calculus II 


4 


PHY311 


Modern Physic I Lab 


1 




PHY253 


Physics w/Calculus II Lab 1 


PEG332 


Dynamics 


3 




MAT203 


Calculus III 


3 

17 


CSC373 


C++Programmingt 


3 
16 




Junior Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 






PHY312 


Modern Physic II 


3 


PHY320 


Thermodynamics # or 




3 


PHY313 


Modern Physics II 


1 




Elective 








Lab 




PHY441 


Electromagnetism II 




3 


PHY318 


Optics 


3 


PHY461 


Quantum Mechanics II 




3 


MAT470 


Senior Physics Lab 


2 


PHY463 


Solid State Physics 




3 


PHY440 


Electromagnetism I 


3 


MAT410 


Differential Equations 




3 


PHY460 


Quantum Mechanics I 


3 
15 








1! 



Social Sciences I (Foundations of Social Inquiry): Choose one course from PSY 200 Intro to Psychology; SOC 200 Intro 
to Sociology; ECO 201 Principles of Macroeconomics and ECO 202 Principles of Microeconomics. 

Social Sciences II (Societies and Identities): Choose one course from the following accepted electives: CSC202H 
Technology, HIS 103 African American History I and HIS 335 African in the Modern World. 

Humanities with writing I: One from HIS 101 World Civilization I; HIS 102 World Civilization II and HIS 200 History 
of United States of America. 

Humanities with writing II: One of REL 101 Intro to Religion and REL 201 Intro to Philosophy. 

*Can be substituted with ENG 104H, Honors English I and ENG 102 can be substituted with ENG 105H, Honors 
English II 

**General Chemistry II and Lab is required for Civil Engineering and Biomedical Engineering students only. 

tVisual Programming and CSC 395 Software Engineering Principle: for Computer, Electrical and Mechanical 
Engineering students; and Java for Computer Engineering students. 

Bio-Engineering students must see their advisor for the biology and chemistry courses. 

This applies to students interested in pursuing an engineering program in which Thermodynamics is not part of the 
curriculum at the partnering institution (FIU). Foreign Language I and II are not required for FIU, if they have been 
previously taken in high school. 

At Florida Memorial University, a freshman student with a deficiency in Physics and/or 
Mathematics at the high school level is advised to take the following remedial courses: College 
Algebra (MAT 111), Pre-Calculus (MAT 1 12), College Trigonometry (MAT 113), General Physics 
I and Lab (PHY140 &141) and General Physics II and Lab (PHY142 &143). Credits in these 
remedial courses cannot be applied toward graduation credits in Physics and in Engineering. 
Students in remedial classes (099) may not enroll in upper level classes until all deficiencies, 



119 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



including MAT 110-MAT 113 have been completed with grade C or better. First-year students 
placed in DSM 099 or in MAT 110 must meet with their advisors to discuss and decide how to 
proceed in their studies. 

MINORS 

Minor in Biology 

A minor in biology consists of a minimum of 20 credit hours in biology beyond the general 
education biology requirements. A grade of C or better must be earned in each course. The 
overall cumulative grade point average for the minor must be 2.5 or above. Courses that may be 
used for the minor must be selected from the list of core and elective biology courses in 
consultation with the biology advisor. 

Minor in Chemistry 

A minor in chemistry consists of 16 credits in chemistry courses at the 200-level or above, at 
least four credits of which must be at the 300- or 400-level. All courses must be passed with a 
grade of C or higher. 

Minor in Ecology 

A minor in Ecology consists of the following courses: Introduction to Environmental Science, 
Ecology and Ecology Lab, Urban Ecology and Ecology Lab, Wetland Ecology and Wetland 
Ecology Lab, and Ecology of South Florida and Ecology of South Florida Lab. Students should 
note that there may be prerequisites to these courses. Any substitutions must be approved by 
the Director of Environmental Studies. 

Minor in Environmental Science 

A minor in Environmental Science consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours in environmental 
studies courses. A grade of "C" or better must be earned in every course. The overall 
cumulative grade point average for the minor must be 2.5 or above. Courses used for the minor 
must be selected from the list of Core and elective courses in consultation with the 
environmental studies advisor. 

Minor in Physics 

A minor in physics consists of 20 credits in physics courses at the 200-level or above, at least 
four credits of which must be at the 300- or 400-level. All courses must be passed with a grade of 
C or higher. 

DEPARTMENT OF THE HUMANITIES 

The Department of Humanities offers majors in three programs: Communications 
(Broadcasting, Public Relations), English, and Religion and Philosophy. These programs 
prepare students for further study at the graduate or professional school level, as well as for 
entry into professional careers. The varied humanities disciplines are unified by their unique 

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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



ways of communicating— sharing human experience and knowledge. The humanities are the 
mirror and repository of culture. Like cultural institutions, they serve human needs. The 
Department of Humanities prepares students to compete successfully in the global, cultural, 
and economic community. 

Department Mission Statement 

The Humanities Department is designed to assist the University in its mission and recognizes 
that the study of the humanities contributes to the quality of life. The Department expects that 
students will leave its community of scholars and traditions prepared to participate fully in 
society. 

Objectives of the Department 

1. To give students an integral knowledge of the humanities via the study of 
communications, modern language, and religion and philosophy 

2. To provide formal instruction to students who want to pursue careers in humanities 
professions 

3. To develop awareness and understanding of the role of professionals in a complex and 
evolving society 

4. To develop ideals and attitudes in students leading to professional actions that are 
ethically sound and integral to societal demands 

5. To prepare students to compete successfully in an evolutionary, global, cultural and 
economic community 

6. To prepare students for admission to graduate school or professional schools and 
theological seminaries 

7. To inspire the desire and hone the abilities of students to develop and maintain high 
standards of performance in spoken and written communication 

Departmental Graduation Requirements 



1. Completion of graduation requirements for undergraduates as identified under 
Academic Affairs of this catalog 

2. Completion of required courses in the major with a grade of "C" or better and an overall 
GPAof2.0 

3. Appropriate materials for graduation filed with the Registrar 



121 



Florida Manorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Bachelor of Arts in 
Communication - Public Relations 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication, with a concentration in Public Relations, 
prepares students for careers in business organizations, educational institutions, government 
agencies, medical facilities, non-profit organizations, public relations agencies and sports and 
entertainment operations, among others. The public relations major provides students 
opportunities to develop strategic communication, writing, and critical thinking skills that are 
vital in the global marketplace. The practical applications of ethics are also carefully 
considered. Students learn from practicing professionals and internships. 

Goals 

Graduates of public relations will: 

• Understand the role of liberal arts education to long-term success in the public relations 
profession 

• Possess communication skills, such as the ability to write clearly and cogently, and the 
ability to deliver effective oral presentations 

• Be able to critically evaluate the social, cultural and historical impact of media 

• Develop an awareness and appreciation of ethical issues in public relations 

• Apply ethical principles to their careers 

• Learn the skills required to become a critical consumer of various media contexts and 
content. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Graduates of the Public Relations Concentration will demonstrate 

solid writing skills in media and public relations formats, such as media alerts, news 

releases, PSAs, strategic and tactical public relations campaign materials and plans, etc. 

the communication skills needed to build and maintain excellent client relationships, 

including organizational communications and business presentations 

understanding and expertise of public relations functions including message 

development, problem analysis, strategic planning, and tactical outcomes 

knowledge of the history and function of the news media and the necessary skills to 

work with members of the media under both proactive and reactive circumstances 

how ethical principles are implemented in a variety of public relations situations. 

written and oral proficiency in their senior projects. 



122 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Graduation Requirements 

This degree program requires a minimum of 122 semester hours for completion. All students majoring in Public 
Relations must earn a grade of "C" or better in all Communication courses. 



Freshman Year 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



ENG 101 


College Writing 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


MAT 110 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3 




Nat Science Req 


3 


REA 101 


Critical Think /Read or 




COM103 


Intro Pub Speak 


3 


ENG 111 


First Year Lit 


3 


PED110 


Dim of Wellness 


2 


CSC 101 


Intro to Computers 


3 
15 






1 


Sophomore Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 





REL 101 Intro to Religion or 
REL201 Intro to Philosophy 
POL 301 U.S. Government 
Social Science Req 

Humanities Req 

Foreign Lang Req 



3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



HIS 103 
HIS 104 



COM 301 



Afri Amer Hist or 
Afri Amer Hist 
Nat Science Req 
Foreign Lang Req 
Humanities Req 
Sur of Mass Comm 



3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



Junior Year 
First Semester 



COM 203 
COM 294 
COM 309 
COM 314 
COM 422 



Newswrit & Report 
Writ for Elect Media 
Fund Rad/TV Prod 
Prin of Pub Rel 
Comm Rsrch 



Senior Year 
First Semester 

COM 325 Pub Opin/Prop 
COM 423 Public Rel Camp 
COM 442 Media Law/Eth 
COM 323 Organ Comm 
Elective 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



Second Semester 



3 


COM 317 


Publicat Design 


3 


3 


COM 205 


Pub Rel Writ 


3 


3 


COM 334 


Persuasive Com 


3 


3 


COM 308 


Voice/Diction or 




3 


COM 306 


Bus & Prof Spk 


3 


15 





Business Elective 


3 
15 




Second Semester 





COM 318 
COM 494 
COM 495 
COM 344 



Marketing Elect 
Case Stud in PR 
Pub Rel Intern 
Senior Project 
Div & Mass Com 
Elective 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 



Core Requirements for Majors 

COM 203 Newswriting & Reporting 3 

COM 301 Survey of Mass Comm 3 

COM 334 Persuasive Communication 3 

COM 422 Communication Research 3 

COM 442 Media Law & Ethics 3 



123 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Suggested Electives 

COM 306 Bus & Prof. Speaking 3 

COM 307 Argumentation and Debate 3 

COM 308 Voice & Diction 3 

COM 319 Int'l Mass Comm 3 

COM 400 Advanced Public Speaking 3 

BUS 211 Principles of Management 3 

BUS 345 Bus. Communications 3 

BUS 350 Human Resource Mgmt 3 

MAR 301 Principles of Marketing 3 

MAR 460 Advertising 3 

Bachelor of Arts in 

Communication -Broadcast 

The Bachelor of Arts in Communication, with a concentration in Television, prepares students for careers in 
television, either as broadcast journalists or as producers. Students majoring in this concentration will develop 
broadcast communication skills, including announcing, on-camera performance, voice over production, video 
production and editing, audio production, and directing. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Graduates of the Television Concentration will 

• Be capable of writing broadcast scripts, news stories and features proficiently and correctly in styles and 
forms appropriate for the various communication audiences, and develop portfolios of broadcast projects 
using appropriate techniques and technologies 

• Understand and apply ethical principles, laws of freedom of speech and press, and constitutional guarantees 
to the communications professions 

• Be capable of conducting research and evaluating information using appropriate methods relevant to the 
communications professions. 

• Be capable of developing strategic communication, writing, critical thinking, broadcast communication and 
production skills. Acquire on-the-job experience under the joint supervision of an employer and the 
Dean/Department Chair. 

Graduation Requirements 

The degree requires a minimum of 122 semester hours for completion. Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in 
all Communication courses. 

Freshman Year 

First Semester Second Semester 

ENG 101 College Writing I 
MAT 110 Intermediate Algebra 
FMU 101 University 101 
REA 101 Critical Think/Read or 
ENG 111 First Year Literature 

12 14 

124 



3 


ENG102 


College Writing 11 


3 


3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 


3 




Nat. Science Req. 


3 




COM 103 


Intro to Pub. Speak. 


3 


3 


PED110 


Dim of Wellness 


2 




CSC 101 


Intro to Computers 


3 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Sophomore 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




REL 101 


Intro to Religion or 


3 


HIS 103 


African Amer. His or 


3 


REL 201 


Intro to Philosophy 


3 


HIS 104 


African Amer. His. 




POL 301 


U.S. Government 


3 




Nat. Science Req. 


3 




Social Science Req. 


3 




Foreign Lang. Req. 


3 





Humanities Req. 


3 





Humanities Req. 


3 





Foreign Lang. Req. 


3 
15 


COM 301 


Sur of Mass Comm. 


3 

15 


Junior Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




COM 203 


News writing & Rep. 


3 


COM 295 


Television News Rep. 


3 


COM 201 


Writing Elect. Media 


3 




Elective 


3 


COM 328 


TV Newscasting 


3 


COM 334 


Persuasive Com 


3 




Major Elective 


3 




Major Elective 


3 




Major Elective 


3 


COM 422 


Comm. Research 


3 




Business Elective 


3 

IS 


COM 329 


TV Production 


3 




IS 


Senior Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




COM 442 


Media Law & Ethics 


3 




Marketing Elective 


3 


COM 494 


Internship 


3 


COM 495 


Senior Project 


3 




Elective 
Elective 
Flective 


3 
3 
3 


COM 406 


Television Practicum 
Elective 


3 




3 







15 



12 



Core Requirements for Majors 

COM 203 Newswriting & Reporting 3 

COM 301 Survey of Mass Comm 3 

COM 334 Persuasive Communication 3 

COM 422 Communication Research 3 

COM 442 Media Law & Ethics 3 

Suggested Electives 

COM 306 Bus & Prof. Speaking 3 

COM 307 Argumentation and Debate 3 

COM 308 Voice & Diction 3 

COM 314 Principles of Public Relations 3 

COM 319 Int'l Mass Comm 3 

COM 344 Diversity in Mass Com 3 

COM 400 Advanced Public Speaking 3 

BUS 211 Principles of Management 3 

BUS 345 Bus. Communications 3 

MAR 301 Principles of Marketing 3 

MAR 460 Advertising 3 



125 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Minor in Communication 

A minor in Communication consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours from the Core Curriculum beyond the General 
Education requirements. A grade of "C" or better must be earned in each course. The following Core courses are 
recommended: 

COM 301 Survey of Mass Comm 3 

COM 203 Newswriting & Reporting 3 

COM 205 Public Relations Writing 3 

COM 442 Mass Media Law & Ethics 3 

COM 314 Principles of Public Relations 3 

COM 423 Public Relations Campaigns 3 

COM 309 Fund of Radio/TV Prod 3 



Bachelor of Arts in 

English 

The English major/minor provides an important foundation in literature, advanced 
writing and research skills for graduates entering fields such as religion, business, 
management, government, law, marketing, advertising, communication, technical writing 
and editing, public relations, education, and multimedia journalism. 

A major in English also prepares students for graduate study in English language and 
literature. Upon the recommendation of an English advisor, English majors may minor in 
a number of disciplines to better prepare them for specific career goals. 

The primary Mission of the English area is to support and promote the Mission of Florida 
Memorial University. Great emphasis is placed on instruction in Freshman core classes to 
maximize student success and retention from the first semester forward. The discipline of 
English embraces literature in the broadest interpretation of the word as a gateway to 
strengthen student writing, critical thinking, and creative research and expression. The English 
area prepares students to become insightful, technologically literate, life-long learners who 
understand the connection between theory and application in order to compete successfully in 
careers and/or advanced studies within a complex and evolving global society. 

Goals 

Upon completion of the Bachelor of Arts in English program students will 

1) Write according to purpose and audience 

2) Write focused essays in clear, grammatical prose using Edited American English 

3) Think creatively and independently 

4) Ethically gather, understand, evaluate, and synthesize information 

5) Perform formal research according to MLA documentation and style 

6) Demonstrate knowledge of literary history 

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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



7) Demonstrate knowledge of literary forms / genres 

8) Demonstrate understanding of important literary concepts and terms 

9) Use critical strategies in responding to literature 

10) Analyze and evaluate literature with well articulated positions, illustrations, and support 

11) Use technology appropriate to the assignment. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) 

Upon completion of the Bachelor of Arts in English program students will have 
demonstrated mastery in 

• Writing essays that focus on purpose and respond to the needs of different 
audience 

• Understanding a research writing assignment as a series of tasks, including 
finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing appropriate primary and 
secondary sources 

• Using multiple strategies for generating, organizing, revising, editing, 
proofreading, and writing essays 

• Writing essays structured with clear beginnings, theses, appropriate body 
paragraph development and conclusions 

• Writing essays with content which demonstrates critical thinking in a logical and 
clear progression using language appropriate to audience with assertions which 
are clearly supported or illustrated 

• Writing essays with an acceptable number of syntax and grammar errors for the 
criteria of the papers 

• Performing formal research according to MLA documentation and style. 

• The knowledge of literary history, forms and genres, as well as an understanding 
of important literary concepts and terms 

• Using technology appropriate to the assignment 

• Presenting research findings orally in an effective manner appropriate to purpose and 
audience. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

This degree program requires a minimum of 122 semester hours for graduation. English 
majors must take a minimum of 42 credits in English at the 200 level or above and complete 
a minimum of twelve (12) credit hours in sequence in the same modern language other than 
English. To graduate, an English major must earn a C or better in all ENG and modern 
language courses. A C- or lower in any major course is not considered passing and the 
course must be retaken. 

Freshman Year 

First Semester Second Semester 

ENG 101 College Writing I 3 ENG 102 College Writing II 3 

MAT 110 Inter. Algebra 3 MAT 111 College Algebra 3 

PED110 Dim of Wellness 2 CSC 101 Intro to Comp 3 

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Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



FMU 101 University 101 
ENG 111 First Year Lit 



Sophomore Year 
First Semester 

ENG 202 World Literature II 
COM103 Intro Pub Speak 

200 Humanities Req 

Nat Science Req 

201 For Lang Req I 



3 


HIS 


Afri Amer Hist I or II 




3 


REL 101 


Intro to Religion or 


3 




REL201 


Intro to Philosophy 




I 1 






15 




Second S 


emester 




3 


PSY 200 


Intro to Psychology 


3 


3 


ENG 2__ 


Approved Elective 


3 


3 





Nat Science Req 


3 


3 


202 


For. Lang Req II 


3 


3 




Gen Elective 


} 


15 






15 



Junior Year 
First Semester 

HIS 200 History of the USA 
ENG 309 Adv Gram & Com 

ENG 3 Approved Elective 

301 Int Foreign Lang I 

General Elective 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Second Semester 

ENG 308 Afri Amer Lit 
ENG 304 English Lit. II 

302 Int. For Lang II 

ENG 3 Approved Elective 

ENG 3 Approved Elective 



3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
15 



Senior Year 
First Semester 

ENG 495 Senior Project 
ENG 443 Special Topics 
ENG 405 Creative Writing 

General Elective 

General Elective 

General Elective 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 



ENG3_ 
ENG 4. 
ENG 4 



Approved Electives 

ENG 201 World Literature I 3 

ENG 212 Ethnic American Literature 3 

ENG 297 Caribbean Literature 3 

ENG 303 English Literature I 3 

ENG 304 English Literature II 3 

ENG 308 African American Literature 3 

ENG 310 Study Abroad 3-6 

ENG 315 Adolescent Literature 3 

ENG 316 African Amer. Women Writers 3 

ENG 340 Contemporary Amer. Literature 3 

ENG 351 Contemporary Poetry 3 

ENG 355 Harlem Renaissance 3 

ENG 361 Contemporary Fiction 3 

ENG 371 Contemporary Drama 3 

ENG 383 Literary Criticism 3 

ENG 400 Novel 3 

ENG 401 Renaissance Literature 3 

ENG 402 Romantic Literature 3 

ENG 403 Shakespeare 3 

ENG 404 Victorian Literature 3 

ENG 405 Creative Writing 3 



Second Semester 

Approved Elective 
Approved Elective 
Approved Elec. 
General Elective 
General Elective 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



ENG 410 Study Abroad 3-6 

ENG 442 Post-Colonial Literature 3 

ENG 443 Special Topics 3 

ENG 444 Mythology 3 

ENG 455 American Literature (1800-1865) 3 

ENG 456 American Literature (1865-1914) 3 

ENG 457 American Literature (1914-1945) 3 

ENG 465 Internship 3-6 

Minor in English 

Students wishing to minor in English must take six courses (18 credits): 

ENG 201 World Literature I (or) 

ENG 202 World Literature II 

ENG 212 Ethnic American Literature 

ENG 297 Caribbean Literature 

ENG 308 African American Literature 

ENG 316 African American Women Writers 

ENG 340 Contemporary American Literature 

ENG 351 Contemporary Poetry 

ENG 355 Harlem Renaissance 

ENG 361 Contemporary Fiction 

ENG 403 Shakespeare 

ENG 455 American Literature (1800-1865) 

ENG 457 American Literature (1914-1945) 

Minor in Foreign Language 

Minor in a Foreign Language provides for the study of French or Spanish with emphasis on the 
history and literature of the culture. The minor is planned by students and their academic 
advisor to include a minimum of 18 semester credit hours of 300- and 400-level courses. 

Language Requirement Non-Native French or Spanish Speakers 

Students must successfully complete a minimum of six (6) credit hours in sequence in the same 
foreign language. English majors are required to complete a minimum of twelve (12) credit 
hours in sequence in the same foreign language. The 201 and 202 courses in French and Spanish 
may NOT be taken through Credit by Examination. These courses may NOT be taken 
simultaneously. The level of the first course a non-native speaker may take is determined by the 
last course completed in high school. For most students, one year in high school will normally 
be considered equal to one semester in University, as indicated in the table below. 

Only junior high or no French or Spanish course take: 

FRE 201 and 202 or SPA 201 and 202 
French I or Spanish I 
FRE 202 and 301 or SPA 202 and 301 
French II or Spanish II 

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Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



FRE 301 and 302 or SPA 301 and 302 

French III or Spanish III 

FRE 307 and 308 or SPA 307 and 308 

French IV or Spanish IV 

FRE 307 and 300 Literature or SPA 307 and 300 Literature 

Native French or Spanish Speakers 

Native French or Spanish speakers are also required to complete six (6) credit hours in sequence 
in a foreign language. If students wish to satisfy this requirement in a language they already 
speak, they may do so by taking courses in sequence as described in the table below. Enrollment 
in FRE 312 or 324 or SPA 312 or 324 is limited to students to have completed only two years or 
less of formal language instruction in their mother tongue at the high school level. These 
courses are NOT open to students who have completed over two years of secondary studies in 
their country of origin. If this describes your level in French or Spanish then enroll in courses 
in the order shown above. 

Little or no formal course work take: FRE 312 and 324 or SPA 312 and 324 

Ability to read and write in the language take: FRE 307 and 308 or SPA 307 and 308 
Thorough knowledge of grammar take: Two 300 civilization or literature courses in the 

appropriate language. 

Bachelor of Arts in 

Religion and Philosophy 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Religion and Philosophy supports the University's Mission in 
that it prepares students for a broad spectrum of leadership positions within the varied fields of 
the ministry, and gives them a broad-based knowledge in philosophy that prepares them for 
various careers. This specialized program is carefully designed to train the student minister in 
the areas of counseling, church administration, and evangelism. Students are also given the 
basic tools necessary for further study at graduate or professional schools in philosophy, or at 
theological seminaries. 

Graduates of Religion and Philosophy will: 

• Be prepared for seminary or graduate school in religion, theology, and/or philosophy, 
a variety of leadership positions in a wide range of Christian ministries, including 
parish/congregation ministry, para-church ministry, chaplaincy, mission work at home 
and abroad, and other forms of church vocation 

• understand the broad and varied interrelationship of religion, philosophy, and culture 
(including music, art, media, law, and diverse forms of popular culture). 

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Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) 

Upon completion of the Bachelor of Arts in English program students will have 
demonstrated mastery in 

• Writing essays that focus on purpose and respond to the needs of different 
audience 

• Understanding a research writing assignment as a series of tasks, including 
finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing appropriate primary and 
secondary sources 

• Using multiple strategies for generating, organizing, revising, editing, 
proofreading, and writing essays 

• Writing essays structured with clear beginnings, theses, appropriate body 
paragraph development and conclusions 

• Writing essays with content which demonstrates critical thinking in a logical and 
clear progression using language appropriate to audience with assertions which 
are clearly supported or illustrated 

• Writing essays with an acceptable number of syntax and grammar errors for the 
criteria of the papers 

• Performing formal research according to MLA documentation and style. 

• The knowledge of literary history, forms and genres, as well as an understanding 
of important literary concepts and terms 

• Using technology appropriate to the assignment 

Presenting research findings orally in an effective manner appropriate to purpose and audience. 
Graduates of the Religion and Philosophy program will 

• bring rigorous biblical, theological, and philosophical reasoning to bear on "real-world" 
issues 

• demonstrate an understanding of the role religious beliefs and practices play in matters of 
social justice, particularly the African American legacy of struggle for equality 

• describe and discuss major events and concepts in Christian history and describe the 
concepts that comprise a religious worldview such as the creation of the world, good and 
evil, salvation, and the meaning of suffering 

• utilize biblical methods of study, criticism, hermeneutics, sermon preparation and delivery 

• demonstrate general knowledge and practical training of pastoral visitation and counseling, 
planning liturgy, and effective church/ministry leadership demonstrate solid writing skills 
for theological and/or philosophical thinking and arguments. 



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Graduation Requirements: This degree program requires 125 hours for completion. 



Freshman 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 College Writ I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writ II 


3 


MAT 110 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MAT 1 1 1 


College Algebra 


3 


CSC 101 


Intro to Comp 


3 


REA 101 


Critical Think/Read or 


3 


FMU101 


University 101 


3 


ENG 111 


First Year Literature 




FED 110 


Dim. of Wellness 


2 


HIS 


African American Hist 


3 


REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


1 
17 


COM 103 


Intro to Pub Speak 


15 


Sophomore Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




HIS 101 


World Civil I 
Sur of Baptist Doc 


3 
3 




Nat Science Req 
Intro to Philosophy 


3 


REL 314 


REL 201 


3 


REL 206 


Old Testament Survey 


3 


HIS 102 


World Civil II 


3 




Nat Science Req 
Intro to Psychology 


3 
3 


REL 207 
REL 202 


New Test Survey 
Philos of Religion 


3 


PSY 200 


3 






15 






15 


Junior Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




REL 310 


The Psalms 


3 


REL 313 


Life & Let of Paul 


3 


REL 402 


8th & 7thCent Prop 


3 


REL 432 


Christian Ethics 


3 


PHI 311 


Ancient Philosophy 


3 


PHI 312 


Western Philosophy 


3 


REL 434 


Life of Christ 


3 


REL 351 


Pastoral Ministry 


3 


PHI 331 


Contemporary Ethics 


3 
IS 


PHI 321 


Philosophy of Art 


3 
15 


Senior Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




REL 473 


Sys Theology I 


3 


REL 474 


Sys Theology II 


3 




Humanities Req 


3 


PHI 431 


Philo of Science 


3 


PHI 411 


Philo of Education 


3 


REL 406 


Internship II 


3 


REL 463 


Black Theology 


3 


REL 495 


Senior Project 


3 


REL 405 


Internship I 


3 

15 


PHI 341 


Logic 


3 
15 



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Department of social sciences 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

The Department of Social Sciences offers the following degree programs: 

* Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice 

* Bachelor of Arts in Political Science/Public Administration 

* Bachelor of Science in Psychology 

* Bachelor of Arts in Sociology 

* Bachelor of Social Work 

Mission Statement 

The mission of the Department of Social Sciences is to advance the intellectual, analytical, and 
communication skills of its students and to prepare them for the challenges of a diverse, global 
society. The Department further aims to nurture character that will enable students to function 
with proficiency and compassion within the human family. The Department is committed to 
providing quality instruction, advisement, and mentorship. The faculty encourages and 
supports student research by providing applied technological learning opportunities in research 
methods and statistics and assisting students in developing a defensible senior project. 

Departmental Goals 

The goals of the Department are 

• To nurture qualities which enable students to function with proficiency and compassion 

within the human family 

• To empower students to function in a global society by allowing them opportunities to 

learn more about themselves and their society 

• To develop critical analytical thinking and writing skills 

• To develop leadership skills 

• To prepare students for entry into graduate and professional school and 

• To prepare students for entry-level positions in government and the private sector. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Students will be able to: 

• Demonstrate understanding of theories, concepts, ideas, methods, models and 
arguments prevalent in a variety of social science disciplines 

• Understand the shifting theoretical paradigms within the social sciences and within the 
disciplines 

• Communicate effectively through oral and written communication. Demonstrate an 
analytical and problem-solving ability in a systematic and logical manner 



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• Conduct empirical research by utilizing both quantitative and qualitative methodologies 
to produce an acceptable scholarly study and be able to present the findings in a logical 
and coherent manner and 

• Utilize appropriate technologies to conduct research and communicate effectively in a 
cogent manner. 

To ensure student achievement, faculty members of the Department of Social Sciences utilize a 
variety of teaching and evaluation techniques, engage students in research activities, and 
promote exceptional learning through internships and service learning. 

Minors are offered in all social sciences degree-granting areas, as well as in African American 
Studies and History. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Program Mission Statement 

The Criminal Justice Program promotes life-long learning among its students with the aim of 
turning them into professionals and leaders in the criminal justice system. The program 
empowers students to become critical thinkers, problem-solvers, policy initiators, ethical actors, 
and competent administrators in the study of crime and criminal behavior, crime prevention 
and justice at all levels of society. The curricula are dynamic, innovative and provide both 
substantive and practical knowledge that connects social-scientific theories with appropriate 
methodologies to serve a diverse multicultural environment. As a result, the program is 
divided into three specialized areas, including Criminal Justice, Criminology, and Pre-Law. 
Students are free and also encouraged to choose their area of particular interest. 

Graduates are prepared for service in parole and probation agencies, correctional institutions, 
and federal, state, local, and private investigative or security agencies, juvenile justice programs, 
and law enforcement agencies. Graduates may choose to further their studies in graduate or 
law schools. 

Program Goals 

1. To enable students to develop substantive knowledge in the field of criminal justice , 
including the laws, theories, causes and methods of crime prevention and control, the 
institutions and the actors involved, as well as the political and legal framework of the 
operations of the criminal justice system 

2. To enable students to communicate effectively and cogently through enhancing their 
speaking and writing skills 

3. To develop critical thinking, analytical, and problem-solving skills and be able to 
address issues from a variety of perspectives 

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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



4. To enable students to acquire skills in conducting scientific research using both 
quantitative and qualitative methods and be able to analyze and interpret data relevant 
to policy areas in criminal justice. 

5. To enable students to understand the ethical implications of criminal justice work and be 
able to perform with integrity. 

Program Student Learning Outcomes 

Upon completion of the Criminal Justice Program, the graduate will be able to: 

1. Understand and analyze critically criminal justice, criminological, criminal law, and 
delinquency concepts, theories and models 

2. Analyze the organizational, cultural and institutional characteristics and operations of 
the major criminal justice system, including law enforcement, corrections, courts, 
adjudications and the sociopolitical and legal implications 

3. Apply appropriate empirical research methodology in describing and analyzing social 
issues pertaining to the criminal justice system 

4. Communicate orally and in writing in a critical, analytical and cogent manner 

5. Perform and function effectively in any professional environment with a full 
understanding of the scope and importance of ethical consideration. 

Bachelor of Arts in 

Criminal Justice 

The criminal justice curriculum prepares men and women for careers and leadership roles in the 
prevention and correction of crime and delinquency. Students majoring in criminal justice study 
criminal justice systems and theories, criminal law, and corrections philosophy. Graduates are 
prepared for service in parole and probation agencies, correctional institutions, and federal, 
state, local, and private investigative or security agencies, juvenile justice programs, and law 
enforcement agencies. Graduates may choose to further their studies in graduate or law schools. 

Graduation Requirements: This degree program requires a minimum of 122 semester hours for completion. 



Freshman 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writ. II 


3 


REA 101 


Crit Think/Read or 


3 


MAT 102 


Coll Math II 


3 


ENG 111 


First Year Lit. 




HIS 


Afr Amer Hist 


3 


MAT 110 


Inter. Algebra 


3 


REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


3 


CSC 101 


Intro to Comp 


3 


PED110 


Dimension of Wellness 


2 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3 
IS 





Humanities Req. 


3 
17 



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Florida Memorial University 
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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Sophomore 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 






Foreign Lang Req 


3 


HIS200 


History of USA 


3 


( RJ 200 


Intro to Crim Just 


3 




Foreign Lang Req 


3 





Elective 


3 


COM 103 


Intro Publ Spk 


3 





Nat Science Req 


3 





Nat Science Req 


3 


SOC 200 


Intro to Sociology 


3 
15 


PSY 200 


Intro Psy 


15 


Junior Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 309 


Adv Gra & Com 


3 


SOC 309 


Socio Deviance 


3 


CRJ JOl 


Criminal Law I 


3 


CRJ 407 


Constitut Law I 


3 


SSC 302 


Intro to Statistics 


3 


PSY 401 


Advance Statist 


3 


SSC 300 


Research Methods 


3 


POL 302 


State & Local Gv 


3 


POL 301 


US Government 


3 
15 


CRJ 304 


Causes & Prev De 


3 
15 


Senior Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




CRJ 403 


Police Admin 


3 


CRJ 403 


Criminology 


3 


CRJ 303 


Probation & Parole 


3 


CRJ 405 


Law Enforcement 


3 


CRJ 423 


Senior Project 


3 


SSC 424 


Field Experience 


3 




Approved Elect 


3 




Approved Elect 


3 


CRJ 409 


Crim Evid & Ct Pr 


3 

15 





Approved Elect 


3 
15 



Approved Electives 

CRJ 400 Selected Topics in Criminal Justice 3 

CRJ 406 Senior Seminar 3 

CRJ 302 Criminal Law II 3 

CRJ 408 Constitutional Law II 3 

CRJ 409 Criminal Evidence and Court Proc. 3 

CRJ 410 Public and Private Security 3 

CRJ 411 Drugs, Alcohol and Crime 3 

CRJ 412 Criminal Investigation 3 

SSC 424 Field Experience 3 

Bachelor of Arts in 

Criminal Justice 

Concentration in Criminology 

This major field of study enhances student appreciation of applying science to the study of crime, criminals, and 
criminal behavior. 

Graduation Requirements: This degree program requires a minimum of 120 semester hours for completion. 



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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Freshman Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


REA 101 


Crit Think/Read or 


3 


CSC 101 


Intro to Comp 


3 


ENG 111 


First Year Lit 




MAT 114 


Finite Mathematics 


3 


MAT 110 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


3 


HIS 


African Amer Hist 


3 





Humanities Req 


3 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3 

15 






15 


Sophomore 


■ Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




PED110 


Dimension of Wellness 2 


HIS 200 


History of USA 


3 




Foreign Lang Req 


3 


COM 103 


Intro Pub Spk 


3 


SSC 200 


Intro to Sociology 


3 


PSC 101 


Physical Science 


3 


BIO 130 


Prin of Biology 


3 


CRJ 200 


Intro Crim Just 


3 


BIO 131 


Prin of Bio Lab 


1 




Foreign Lang Req 


3 


PSY 200 


Intro to Psyc 


3 

15 






15 


Junior Yeai 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 309 


Adv Gra & Com 


3 


SOC 309 


Soc of Deviance 


3 


CRJ 301 


Criminal Law I 


3 


CRJ 307 


Criminology 


3 


SSC 302 


Intro to Stat 


3 


PSY 401 


Advanced Stat 


3 


SSC 300 


Research Methods 


3 


CRJ 407 


Constitution Law 


3 


POL 301 


US Government 


3 
15 


CRJ 403 


Police Admin 


3 
15 


Senior Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




CRJ 305 


Confine Facilities 


3 


CRJ 405 


Law Enforcement 


3 


PSY 308 


Personal Theory 


3 


SSC 423 


Senior Project 


3 




Approved Elect 


3 


CRJ 410 


Pub and Priv Sec 


3 


CRJ 409 


Crim Ev & Co Proc 


3 


CRJ 411 


Drug, Alcoh & Cri 


3 


CRJ 412 


Criminal Invest 


3 

15 





Approved Elect 


3 

15 



Approved Electives 

CRJ 303 Probation and Parole Systems 3 

CRJ 304 Cause & Prevention of Delinquency 3 

CRJ 408 Constitutional Law II 3 

CRJ 406 Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice 3 

CRJ 302 Criminal Law II 3 

SSC 419/421 Field Placement I 3 

PAD 306 Administrative Behavior 3 

POL 302 State & Local Government 3 



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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Bachelor of Arts in 

Criminal Justice 

Concentration in Pre-Law 

These courses will provide each student with both the skills and foundation that will lead to 
either the successful pursuit of employment or attendance at graduate or professional school 
studies. 

Graduation Requirements: This degree program requires a minimum of 122 semester hours for completion. 



Freshman 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


REA 101 


Crit Think/ Read or 


3 


CSC 101 


Intro to Comp 


3 


ENG 111 


First Year Literature 




MAT 114 


Finite Mathematics 


3 


MAT 110 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


3 


HIS 


African Amer Hist 


3 


PED110 


Dim. of Wellness 


2 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3 
15 






14 


Sophomore Year 










First Semt 


?ster 




Second Semester 






Humanities Req 


3 




Foreign Lang Req 


3 





Foreign Lang Req 


3 


COM 103 


Intro Pub Spk 


3 


SOC 200 


Intro to Sociology 


o 


CRJ 200 


Intro Crim Just 


3 





Natural Science Req 


3 


HIS 200 


Hist of the USA 


3 


PSY 200 


Intro to Psy 


3 


ENG 309 


Adv Gra & Com 


3 










Nat Science Req 


_> 






15 






IS 


Junior Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




SSC 300 


Research Mthds 


3 


SOC 309 


Soc of Deviance 


3 


CRJ 301 


Criminal Law I 


3 


CRJ 302 


Criminal Law II 


3 


POL 301 


US Government 


3 


PSY 401 


Adv Statistics 


3 


SSC 302 


Intro to Statistics 


3 


POL 302 


State & Local Gov 


3 


CRJ 305 


Confine Facilities 


3 
15 


CRJ 306 


Corr Phil & Serv 


3 
15 


Senior Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




CRJ 307 


Criminology 


3 


SSC 424 


Field Experience 


3 


CRJ 403 


Police Admin 


3 


SSC 423 


Senior Project 


3 


CRJ 407 


Constit. Law I 


3 


CRJ 408 


Constitut Law II 


3 


CRJ 


Approved Elect 


3 





Approved Elect 


3 


CRJ 409 


Crim Ev & Co Pro 


3 

15 


POL 436 


Political Theory 


3 
15 



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Florida Memorial University 

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Approved Electives 

CR] 304 Causes & Prevention of Delinquency 3 

CRJ 400 Selected Topics in Criminal Justice 3 

CRJ 410 Public and Private Security 3 

CRJ 411 Drugs, Alcohol, and Crime 3 

CRJ 412 Criminal Investigation 3 

POL 330 International Politics 3 

POL 337 Public Policy Analysis 3 

Bachelor of Arts in 

Political Science & Public Administration 

Mission Statement 

The program in Political Science and Public Administration offers background and preparation 
for students seeking to enter graduate or professional school, government service or teaching 
political science in secondary schools. Students interested in teaching in secondary school must 
consult with the School of Education concerning additional courses to be taken in order to meet 
graduation and certification requirements. Students interested in pursuing law as a career will 
work closely with their pre-law advisor. 

Program Goals 

The program goals are to ensure that students: 

1. Understand the fundamental principles, theories, concepts arid ideologies in political 
science and public administration 

2. Develop knowledge of various kinds of political systems, governments, institutions and 
the operations of international political systems 

3. Understand the nature and characteristics of the American national, state and local 
governments and institutions and the administration of these governments 

4. Develop the ability to conduct empirical research using quantitative and qualitative 
methodologies to analyze, interpret and disseminate data in a logical and systematic 
manner 

5. Develop the ability to think critically and communicate effectively both orally and in 
writing 

6. Understand the usage and or applications of extant learning technologies 

7. Understand the interactions of national and international actors in the global political 
arena. 



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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Program Student Learning Outcomes 

At the completion of the Political Science/Public Administration major, graduates will be able 
to: 

1. Articulate the general purposes of life in the polity and public administration principles 
and procedures 

2. Discuss and analyze theoretical, conceptual and ideological principles underlying 
political systems and sub-systems, governments, institutions and processes 

3. Demonstrate through discussion and writing an understanding of American national, 
state and local governments, institutions and politics, as well as the interest groups that 
impact the policy making process in various ways 

4. Articulate public policy processes and the different roles that interest groups play in 
influencing governmental decisions in allocating resources and benefits 

5. Apply the scientific method in the gathering and analyzing of political data, as well as 
communicating findings both orally and in writing 

6. Discuss in logical and analytical manner the interactions of national and international 
actors and institutions in the global diplomatic system 

7. Utilize technology in generating and communicating information and knowledge. 

Graduation Requirements: This degree program requires a minimum of 122 semester hours for completion. 



Freshman 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


REA 101 


Crit Think/Read or 


3 


CSC 101 


Intro to Comp 


3 


ENG 111 


First Year Literature 




MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 


MAT 110 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


REL 101 


Intro, to Religion 


3 


HIS 


AfrAmer His 


3 


PED110 


Dim. of Wellness 


2 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3 
15 






14 


Sophomore Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 







Humanities Req 


3 




Elective 


3 





Foreign Lanq Req 


3 





Foreign Lanq Req 


3 


ECO 201 


Prin of Macro 


3 


POL 200 


Intro Pol Sc 


3 





Nat Science Req 


3 





Nat Science Req 


3 


PSY 200 


Intro to Psy 


3 


COM 103 


Intro Pub Spk 


3 








SOC 200 


Intro to Soc 


3 






15 






IS 


Junior Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




HIS 200 


History of the USA 


3 


PAD 304 


Pub Per Admin 


3 


POL 301 


U.S. Govt 


3 


POL 302 


State & Local Gov 


3 


PAD 301 


Concepts & Issues 


3 


PAD 306 


Admin Behav 


3 


SSC 300 

POL 335 


Research Methods 
Const Law I 


3 
3 

15 


PO1408 


Approved Elect 
Constitut Law II 


3 
3 

15 



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Senior Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




PAD 303 


Prin of Pub Plan 


3 


POL 436 


Political Theory 


3 




Approved Elect 


3 




Approved Elect 


3 


SSC 302 


Intro to Statistics 


3 


POL 333 


Pol of Govt Fin 


3 


POL 311 


Comp Government 


3 


SSC 423 


Senior Project 


3 


SSC 419 


Field Placement 


3 


POL 403 


Man. of Fed Gov. 


3 



15 15 

Approved Electives 

Social Sciences 

SSC 320 Coop. Educ. in the Social Sciences 6 

SSC 424 Field Experience 3 

SSC 420 Field Placement II 3 

Political Science: 

POL 330 International Politics 3 

POL 340 Third World Politics 3 

POL 331 Politics of Black Americans 3 

POL 337 Public Policy 3 

POL 448 International Law & Organization 3 

Public Administration 

PAD 302 Management of Urban Government 3 

PAD 401 Management of State Government 3 

PAD 306 Florida Law & Public Governance 3 

POL 338 Administration of Social Services 3 

Minor in Criminal Justice 

A minor in Criminal Justice requires a minimum of 18 credits hours in criminal justice courses. Students may choose 
18 credit hours from the following courses 

CRJ 200 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 

CRJ 301 Criminal Law I 3 

CRJ 302 Criminal Law II 3 

CRJ 303 Probation and Parole 3 

CRJ 305 Causes and Prevention of 3 

Delinquency and Crime 

CRJ 306 Correctional Philosophy and 3 

Services 

CRJ 403 Police Administration 3 

CRJ 407 Constitutional Law I 3 

CRJ 408 Constitutional Law II 3 

CRJ 409 Criminal Evidence and Court 3 

Procedure 



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Florida Memorial University 

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Minor in Political Science 

A minor in Political Science requires a minimum of 18 credit hours in political science courses. Students may choose 
18 credit hours from the following courses: 

POL 301 US Government 3 

POL 302 State and Local Government 3 

POL 3 1 1 Comparative Government 3 

POL 333 Politics of Government Finance 3 

POL 403 Management of Federal Government 3 

POL 407 Constitutional Law I 3 

POL 408 Constitutional Law II 3 

POL 436 Political Theory 3 

Minor in Public Administration 

A minor in Public Administration requires a minimum of 18 credit hours in public administration courses 

Students may choose 18 credit hours from the following courses: 

PAD 301 Concepts and Issues in Public Admin 3 

PAD 302 Management of Urban Government 3 

PAD 303 Principles of Public Planning 3 

PAD 304 Public Personnel Administration 3 

POL 403 Management of Federal Government 3 

POL 407 Constitutional Law I 3 

POL 408 Constitutional Law II 3 

POL 436 Political Theory 3 

Bachelor of Science in 

Psychology 

Mission of the Program/Discipline 

The undergraduate program in psychology is a dynamic, integrative, student-centered program 
that is characterized by both an academic and service orientation. The program, in terms of its 
academic emphasis, provides students with rigorous academic training as a means of preparing 
them for graduate careers. In terms of its service orientation, the program is geared towards 
training students for entry into various occupational areas including mental health, human and 
social resources, institutional assessment, biological sciences, computer programming and 
educational services. The mission of the Psychology program then is twofold: 1) to prepare 
students for entry into the graduate school of their choice and 2) to prepare students for B.A. 
level employment. 

Program Goals 

The program goals are to ensure that students: 

1 . Understand the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and 
historical trends in psychology 

2. Understand on how to apply psychological knowledge in real life settings 

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3. Understand and apply basic research methods in psychology, including research design, 
data analysis, and interpretation 

4. Learn the ability to vise writing as a means of enhancing their knowledge of psychology 
and in gaining a greater understanding of self and others 

5. Understand and apply psychological principles to personal, social and organizational 
situations 

6. Develop skills in information technologies and the ability to use computers and other 
related technologies for many purposes 

7. Develop the ability to communicate effectively in a variety of formats 

8. Recognize, understand, and respect the complexity of socio-cultural and international 
diversity 

9. Develop insight into their own and others' behavior and mental processes and apply 
effective strategies for self-management and self-improvement 

10. Emerge from the major with realistic ideas about how to implement their psychological 
knowledge, skills, and values in occupational pursuits in a variety of settings. 

Program Student Learning Outcomes 

Upon completion of the undergraduate degree program in Psychology, students will be able to: 

1 . Define psychology, distinguish the difference between the various types of psychology and identify 
major psychologists 

2. Design and conduct basic research on psychology related issues and present their research findings 
in the form of a paper that conforms to APA guidelines 

3. Demonstrate effective communication skills both orally and in writing as a means to enhance their 
knowledge of psychology and presenting their ideas in a manner that confonns to APA guidelines 

4. Describe major applied areas of psychology and identify appropriate applications of psychology in 
solving problems 

5. Demonstrate information technology competence and use appropriate software to produce 
understandable quantitative and qualitative analytical studies of psychological issues in APA 
format 

6. Interact effectively and sensitively with people from diverse backgrounds and cultural perspectives 

7. Apply psychological principles to promote personal development and reflect on their experiences 
and finding meaning in them. 

Graduation Requirements: This degree program requires at least 122 semester hours for 
completion. 

Freshman Year 

First Semester Second Semester 

ENG 101 Coll Writing I 3 ENG 102 Coll Writing II 3 

REA 101 Crit Think/Read or 3 CSC 101 Intro to Comp 3 

ENG 111 First Year Literature MAT 114 Finite Mathematics 3 

MAT 110 Intermediate Algebra 3 Social Science Req 3 

HIS AfrAmer Hist 3 REL 101 Intro, to Religion 3 

FMU 101 University 101 3 

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PED 1 10 


Dim of Wellness 


2 
17 






L5 


Sophomort 


\ear 










First Semester 




Second Semester 







Humanities Req 


3 


SOC 200 


Intro to Soc 


3 





Foreign Lang Req 


3 





Foreign Lang Req 


3 





Elective 


3 





Humanities Req 


3 





Nat Science Req 


3 


COM 103 


Intro Pub Spk 


3 


PSY 200 


Intro to Psy 


L5 





Nat Science Req 


3 
IS 


Junior Veai 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




PSY 407 


Psy of Afri Amer 


3 


PSY 302 


Clinical Psy 


3 




Approved Elect 


3 


PSY 306 


Develop Psy 


3 


SSC 300 


Research Methods 


3 


PSY 401 


Advanced Stat 


3 


PSY 312 


Intro to Statistics 


3 




Approved Elect 


3 


PSY 308 


Personality Theory 


3 
15 





Approved Elect 


3 
15 


Senior Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




PSY 403 


Psych of Learn 


3 


PSY 402 


Clinical Interview 


3 


PSY 406 


Social Psychology 


3 


SOC 305 


Group Dynamics 


3 


PSY 408 


Practicum I 


3 


PSY 409 


Practicum II 


3 




Approved Elective 


3 


SSC 423 


Senior Project 


3 





Approved Elective 


3 
15 





Approved Elect 


3 
15 



Approved Electives 

PSY 300 Foundations of Ind./Org. Psychology 3 

PSY 301 Psychopathology 3 

PSY 303 Experimental Psychology 3 

PSY 310 Community Psychology 3 

PSY 316 Psychology of Culture 3 

PSY 405 Assessment and Evaluation 3 

PSY 451 Minority Mental Health 3 

PSY 453 Psychology and Law 3 

PSY 454 Theory and Practice of College Mentoring 3 

SOC 309 Sociology of Deviance 3 

SOC 402 Racial & Cultural Group 3 

SOC 403 Marriage & Family 3 

SSC 321 Cooperative Education in Social Sciences 6 

(Social Sciences course offerings, 300 level or higher, are not required by this major) 



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Bachelor of 

SOCIAL WORK 

Students majoring in social work learn about the theoretical foundations, practice skills and 
ethical principles of generalist social work practice. Students study the causes of individual, 
family and community problems and strategies that have been found to be effective means of 
preventing and responding to these problems. Students graduating with a degree in social work 
are qualified to pursue graduate education in social work or a related field, or seek employment 
with social services, child welfare, criminal justice, mental health, substance abuse, and 
domestic violence programs, as well as in schools, nursing homes, hospitals, and other human 
services settings. 

Mission of the Bachelor of Social Work Program 

The mission of the Bachelor in Social Work Program is to prepare competent generalist social 
workers with practice knowledge, skills, and values to improve the quality of life for 
individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations. Graduates of the program will 
have an understanding of the impact of political, economic, and social inequalities on the well- 
being of populations-at-risk and a commitment to assume leadership in working to empower 
at-risk individuals, families, and communities. The curriculum is designed to foster an 
appreciation of the traditions, values, and strengths of diverse cultures in the global community. 
The Bachelor in Social Work is committed to encouraging students to pursue advanced 
graduate level social work education and to pursue lifelong professional development. 

Program Goals 

The goals of the Bachelor of Social Work Program are: 

1. To prepare graduates for positions as competent generalist social workers with the 
evidence-informed practical knowledge, skills, and values base needed to improve the 
quality of life for individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations in culturally 
diverse communities in the United States and other countries, and for ongoing professional 
development 

2. To prepare graduates with the ability to understand and critically apply knowledge and 
skills that reflect the capacity to practice without discrimination with clients who vary in 
terms of their race, color, ethnicity, gender, sex, sexual orientation, class, age, disability, 
marital status, family structure, national origin, cultural background, immigration status, 
and religion 

3. To prepare graduates who understand and critically apply evidence-informed theoretical 
person and environment frameworks of human development and behavior as well as those 
relevant to interactions among and between individuals, families, groups, organizations, 
and communities. 

4. To prepare graduates to understand the theoretical frameworks that explain the presence 
and impact of political, social, and economic oppression and discrimination on individuals, 

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families, groups, communities, and organizations; to appreciate the social work profession's 
historical commitment to addressing societal inequities; and to demonstrate the knowledge, 
skills and values needed to assume leadership in influencing social policies and 
empowering at-risk individuals, families, groups, and communities 
5. To prepare graduates to be able to engage in self-reflective, self-critical generalist practice 
with multiple-level client systems in a range of organizational settings, effectively using 
professional supervision and consultation 

Program Student Learning Outcomes: 

Graduating social work students will demonstrate the following learning outcomes/ 
competencies: 

1. Identify themselves as professional social workers and conduct themselves accordingly 

2. Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice 

3. Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments 

4. Engage diversity and difference in practice 

5. Advance human rights and social and economic justice 

6. Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research 

7. Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment 

8. Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver 
effective social work services 

9. Respond to contexts that shape practice 

10. Engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate with individuals, families, groups, organizations, 
and communities. 

Admission to the Bachelor in Social Work Program 

The curriculum for the Bachelor in Social Work major is designed to be fulfilled in 
approximately two years after completion of the general education program for social work 
majors required by Florida Memorial University and completion of SOW 300, Introduction to 
Social Work. Although students may declare social work as a major upon admission to the 
University, students are not fully admitted into the program until they have submitted a formal 
application and have been formally accepted into the program. The applicant must demonstrate 
the characteristics or potential required for competent social work practice as defined in the 
mission statement of the program and the standards of the profession. The following are the 
minimum requirements for admission to the program: 

1. Completion of a minimum of 45 credit hours with a minimum cumulative grade point 
average (GPA) of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale 

2. Satisfactory completion of SOW 300, Introduction to Social Work with a grade of "C" or 
higher 

3. Attainment of a minimum grade of "C" in all social work courses completed 



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4. Satisfactory completion of the Social Work Major Application Form, accompanied by a 
personal essay, a resume as well as two reference letters from faculty with whom the 
student has completed at least one course, with a completed copy of the Social Work Major 
Application Reference form attached to each reference letter 

5. Satisfactory completion of the Social Work Program Admissions Interview. 

The Social Work Admissions Committee reviews applications, conducts an interview with each 
applicant, and subsequently determines acceptance into the major. Provisional status for 
admittance into the program may be granted for one academic semester to any student who has 
not met all the requirements for full admission. Provisional status will be granted at the 
discretion of the Social Work Admissions Committee. 

Admission to Field Practicum 

The culmination of the Bachelor in Social Work Program concludes with the Field Practicum. 
The practicum provides the vehicle for social work students to integrate theory and practice and 
apply this knowledge while demonstrating professional competencies. The Field Practicum is a 
year-long experience. The application for the Field Practicum must be completed by the 
announced deadline one semester prior to the scheduled beginning of the Field Practicum 
experience. The Field Practicum is completed during the senior year. Before applying for the 
Field Practicum, students must have successfully completed all required social work courses. 
Acceptance into the Field Practicum is granted after a student has attended the pre-practicum 
seminar, has completed the application for a field placement, and has been interviewed by the 
Coordinator of Field Education. Additionally, to qualify for acceptance into the Field Practicum, 
students must satisfy the following requirements: 

1. Students must have senior standing 

2. Students must have an overall cumulative GPA 2.5 or higher 

3. Students must have completed the following courses with a minimum overall average of 
2.5: SOW 301 Human Behavior and Dynamics, SOW 302 Human Behavior and the Social 
Environment, SOW 303 Research Methods, SOW 405 Social Policy, SOW 408 Social 
Work Writing Techniques, and SOW 409 Social Work Practice 1 

4. Students must have a minimum grade of "C" in all social work courses 

5. Students must complete a nationwide level II criminal record background check. If this 
background check indicates that a student has a criminal background, the Coordinator 
of Field Education will meet with the student to discuss which field sites may be 
amenable to accepting a student with a criminal background and which field sites may 
be resistant. 

Social work majors must obtain a copy of the Field Practicum Manual from the Social Work 
Program's Coordinator of Field Education for further information about the Field Practicum. 



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Graduation Requirements 

The student must complete all requirements for the social work major and submit all 
appropriate materials for graduation with the Registrar. Specifically, 

1. Students must complete a minimum of 121 semester hours 

2. Students must maintain an overall cumulative G.P. A. of 2.5 or better 

3. Students must receive a minimum grade of "C" in each social work course. 

This degree program requires a minimum of 121 semester hours for completion. In order to 
complete the degree in four years, students must either take 15-16 credits a semester or attend at 
least one summer session. 



Freshman Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


REA101 


Crit Think/Read or 


3 


PED110 


Dim of Well 


2 


ENG 111 


First Year Literature 




MAT 114 


Finite Mathematics 


3 


MAT 110 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


HIS 


Afr Amer Hist 


3 


CSC 101 


Intro to Comp 


3 


REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


3 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3 

15 






14 


Sophomore 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




PSY 200 
SOC 200 


Intro to Psy 
Intro to Soc 


3 
3 





Elective 
Humanities req 


3 
3 


BioToi 


Foreign Lang Req I 
Biological Sc 


3 
3 


SOW300 


For Lang Req II 
Intro Soc Work 


3 
3 


COM 103 


Intro Pub Spkg 


3 

15 





Nat Science Req 


3 
15 


Junior Year 












First Semester 


Second Semester 




SOW 301 


Hum Behav/Dyn 


3 


SOW 302 


Hum Beh/Soc En 


3 


POL 301 


US Government 


3 


SOW 303 


Research Met 


3 


PSY 312 


Intro to Statistics 


3 


SOW 408 


S W Writing Tech 


I 




Elective 


3 


SOW 409 


Soc Work Prac I 


3 




Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 





Elective 


3 

18 






13 


Senior Year 












First Semester 


Se 


'cond Semester 




SOW 410 


Soc Work Pract II 


3 


SOW 412 


Field Pract/Sem III 


6 


SOW 411 


Field Pract/Sem I 


6 


SOW 414 


Soc Work Pract III 


3 


SOW 405 


Social Policy 


3 




Elective 


3 


SOW 413 


Senior Project SW 


3 

15 





Elective 


3 
15 



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Bachelor of Arts in 

SOCIOLOGY 

Program Mission Statement 

Students majoring in sociology learn concepts, methods, theories and perspectives important to 
the study of social relationships, social structures, social institutions, and society. This field of 
study allows students to gain practical as well as theoretical insight into human interaction. 
Students majoring in sociology are concerned with the study of social life and the causes and 
consequences of human behavior. Sociology includes the study of each aspect of the self in 
relationships with others and each aspect of the social world that affects a person's thoughts, 
actions and deeds. 

Students majoring in sociology learn the dynamics of group behavior, the power and potential 
of community groups, and the implication of marriage and the family. These students must 
also become familiar with the literature of social problems, such as crime, violence, deviance, 
racism, and sexism. 

Students graduating with a degree in sociology often find employment in social service 
agencies, law enforcement agencies, treatment centers, and rehabilitation facilities. Sociology 
majors are encouraged to consider further study at the graduate level. 

Program Goals 

The program goals are to ensure that students: 

1 . Understand the dominant theories and concepts in the field of Sociology 

2. Develop the ability to analyze critically the characteristics and interactions of various 
social groups comprising the metrics of society 

3. Develop an awareness of the subject matter and various analytical perspectives operant 
in the field 

4. Develop proficient oral and written communication skills for effective dissemination of 
sociological knowledge and information 

5. Develop proficiency in conducing scientific research and promulgation of findings in a 
systematic and logical manner 

6. Utilize cutting-edge technology in generating and communicating information and 
knowledge. 



Program Student Learning Outcomes 

Upon completion of the program, graduates will be able to: 

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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



1. Identify the theoretical and conceptual frameworks extant in Sociology and allied 
disciplines 

2. Analyze critically the identities, roles and functions, and behavioral characteristics of 
social groups and the typifying interactions 

3. Articulate orally and in writing an awareness of the conflux of sociological perspectives, 
phenomena, debates, and controversies that occupy contemporary sociological discourse 

4. Conduct and analyze sociological research and be able to disseminate findings in 
accordance with scientific standards 

5. Apply up-to-date technologies in gathering, analyzing and disseminating relevant 
sociological information and knowledge 

6. Discuss and analyze the interactions of cultures in the global system. 



Graduation Requirements: This degree program requires at least 122 semester hours for completion. 



Freshman Year 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


REA 101 


Crit Think/Read or 


3 


CSC 101 


Intro to Comp 


3 


ENG 111 


First Year Literature 




MAT 102 


College Math II 


3 


MAT 1 10 


College Math 1 


3 





Social Science Req 


3 


HIS_ 


Afr Amer Hist 


3 


REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


3 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3 








PED110 


Dim of Well 


2 

17 






IS 


Sophomore Year 










First Seme; 


;ter 




Second Semester 







Humanities Req 
Foreign Lang Req 
Elective 


3 
3 
3 


SOC 200 


Intro to Sociology 
Foreign Lang Req 
Elective 


3 
3 
3 


PSY 200 


Nat Science Req 
Intro to Psy 


3 
3 
15 


COM 103 


Intro Pub Spk 
Nat Science Req 


3 
> 
15 


junior Yeai 












First Semester 




Second Semester 





SOC 303 



PSY 312 
SOC 307 



Social Problems 
Sociology Elective 
Sociology Elective 
Intro to Statistics 
Comm Organ 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



SSC 300 
SOC 304 
SOC 308 

PSY 401 



Research Methods 
Social Psychology 
Urban Soc 
Approved Elect 
Advanced Stat 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Senior Yeai 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




SOC 306 


Urban Soc Mov'nt 


3 


SOC 404 


Sem Social Theory 


3 


SOC 403 


Marriage & Fam 


3 


SOC 309 


Soc of Deviance 


3 


SSC 421 


Field Placement I 


3 


SSC 423 


Senior Project 


3 




Approved Elective 


3 


SOC 402 


Race/Cult Group 


3 




Approved Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 



15 



15 



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Florida Memorial University 

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Approved Electives 

SOC400 Independent Study 3 

SOC405 Survey Research 3 

PSY407 Psychology of African Americans 3 

SSC 321 Cooperative Edu in the Social Sciences 6 

SSC 422 Field Placement II 6 

SSC 424 Field Experience 3 

SOC 431 Seminar in Drug Abuse 3 

SOC 450 Sociology of Religion 3 
(Social Sciences course offerings, 300 level or higher, not required by this major) 



Minor in African American Studies 

An interdisciplinary program in African American Studies is available to students with a significant interest and 
commitment to serious academic study of African American history and culture. Upon entering the program, a 
student with a minor in African American Studies shall consult with the Chair of the Department of Social Sciences 
and plan his/her program of study. This student is required to complete 18 hours for the minor in African American 
Studies, including HIS 103 African American History I (3), HIS 104 African American History II (3). SOC 406 
Contemporary Black America (3), ENG 208 African-American Literature (3) and two electives from the following 
options: 

Required Courses : 

HIS 103 African American History I 3 

HIS 104 African American History II 3 

SOC 406 Contemporary Black America 3 

ENG 208 African- American Literature _3 

12 

Electives 

In addition to the aforementioned core requirements, this minor requires students to choose a minimum of two (2) of 
the following courses: 

HIS 335 Africa in the Modern World 3 

HIS 350 History of the Caribbean 3 

SOC 408 African American Women in Amer. Society 3 

POL 331 Politics of Black Americans 3 

PSY 407 Psychology of the African American 3 
(Other courses as approved by advisor) 

MINOR IN HISTORY 

A program of study in history serves as a sound foundation for students who seek careers in 
various branches of government work; in teaching, from the public schools to the university 
level; in regional and local history society work, in museum work, in park administration, in 
archives and records management, in religion, and in business and industry. 

Students seeking a minor in history will complete a minimum of 18 credit hours of history 
including HIS 300, HIS 321, 324 and 3 credit hours of advanced courses in each of the following: 
U.S. History, African or Caribbean History, and Non-Western History. All courses are to be 

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chosen by the student in consultation with a departmental advisor and must be passed with a 
grade of "C" or higher. 

Prospective minors should consult a departmental advisor as early as possible. Students are 
required to have a graduation interview with their advisors during the final semester of study. 

Required Courses 

HIS 101 World Civilization I 3 

HIS 200 History of the United States 3 

HIS 300 Historical Thought and Writing 3 

HIS 430 Selected Topics in History 3 

12 

Electives 

In addition to the aforementioned core requirements, this minor requires students to choose a minimum of two (2) of 
the following courses: 

HIS 102 World Civilization II 3 

HIS 321 U.S. History to 1865 3 

HIS 324 U. S. History Since 1865 3 

HIS 335 Africa in the Modern World 3 

HIS 350 History of the Caribbean 3 

HIS 400 History of the Non-Western World 3 

SOC 408 African American Women in 3 

American Soc. 

HIS 410 Hist, of Florida and the South 3 

HIS 420 Independent Study 3 

Minor in Psychology 

A minor in psychology requires a minimum of 18 credit hours in 300 or higher level psychology 
courses. Courses toward a minor in psychology are taken above and beyond the course 
requirements for any major. 

Minor in Social Welfare 

A minor in social welfare which requires a minimum of 18 credit hours in social work and 
elective courses is designed for students interested in learning about the field of social work and 
the role of social workers. Students are introduced to the theoretical underpinnings of the social 
work field, the history of the profession, and the different settings in which social workers 
practice. Prospective minors should consult with the Coordinator of the Social Work Program as 
early as possible. 

NOTE: Only students majoring in social work are eligible to take social work practice and field 
practicum courses SOW 409 Social Work Practice I or SOW 410 Social Work Practice II, and 
SOW 411 and SOW 412. 

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Required Courses: 

SOW 300 Introduction to Social Work 3 

SOW 301 Human Behavior and Dynamics 3 

SOW 302 Human Behavior and the Social Envi. 3 
SOW 405 Social Policy 3 

Electives 

In addition to the aforementioned core requirements, this minor requires students to choose a 
minimum of two (2) electives. Students must select their elective courses in consultation with a 
member of the social work faculty and their academic advisor. Appropriate electives include the 
following courses: SOC 402 Racial and Cultural Groups, SOC 403 Marriage and Family, and 
SOC 305 Group Dynamics, CRJ 200 Intro to Criminal Justice, PSY 301 Psychopathology, PSY 406 
or SOC 304 Social Psychology, PSY 407 Psychology of the African American, SOC 303 Social 
Problems, SOC 309 Sociology of Deviance and SSC 200 Cultural Anthropology. 

Minor in Sociology 

A minor in sociology requires a minimum of 18 credit hours of 300 or higher level sociology 
courses. Courses toward a minor in sociology are taken above and beyond the course 
requirements for any major. 

Department Of Visual & Performing Arts 

The Department of Visual & Performing Arts educates students in the fields of Music, Art, 
Theatre and Dance. The Department offers the Bachelor of Music and the Bachelor of Arts in 
Music and in conjunction with the School of Education, the Bachelor of Science in Music 
Education. Minors in Visual Arts and Music are also offered. 

Mission of the Department of Visual & Performing Arts 

The mission of the Department of Visual and Performing Arts is to transform students into 
artistic leaders, scholars and entrepreneurs able to use creatively the arts as vehicles for social 
and economic empowerment for themselves and the global community. The Department 
embraces the University's mission to inculcate in students the importance of life-long learning, 
character, and dedication to the free exchange of ideas, and the Department strives to foster a 
culture of excellence and innovation. 

Goals of the Department 

1. To prepare students for careers in the visual and performing arts 

2. To provide experiential learning opportunities for student growth 

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3. To prepare students for admission to graduate or professional schools 

4. To create an active community of students and faculty ready to explore all areas of 
the visual and performing arts 

5. To develop student-involved initiatives to enhance the aesthetic and cultural life of 
the university family and the community at large. 

Bachelor Degrees in 

Music 

The Bachelor of Music and the Bachelor of Arts degrees in Music are offered through the 
Department of Visual and Performing Arts. The Bachelor of Science degree is offered in Music 
Education in conjunction with the School of Education (see Bachelor of Science in Music 
Education). The Music area also offers a minor in Music. 

The Bachelor of Music is the initial professional degree in Music. It is offered in either Church 
Music or Jazz Studies. These programs are designed to place qualified individuals in the 
profession of music as performers or directors. The curriculum provides for the cultivation of 
requisite skills, the acquisition of professional knowledge, and the development of aesthetic 
appreciation with opportunities for research and internships with professional organizations 
and businesses which will prepare them for numerous employment opportunities and graduate 
studies. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is a liberal arts degree with a major in music. Students are exposed 
to a broad program of general education and are allowed to incorporate eighteen elective credits 
in an area of their choice. This allows students to prepare for graduate studies in or entry into 
areas such as Music Therapy, Music Business, Technology, and Law. Emphasis is placed upon 
development of musicianship, performing ability and overall student growth. 

Music degree students are required to audition before the music faculty to demonstrate the 
extent of their music proficiency for placement and potential scholarships. Music scholarship 
students are required to participate in performances by their ensembles in order to maintain this 
financial assistance. Applicants entering with extensive musical training, knowledge, and 
experience will have the opportunity to test out of some of the first and second year music 
courses. Majors are required to be enrolled in applied instruction on a primary instrument or 
voice unless an exception is granted by the faculty. Additionally, each student must prepare at 
least one selection per semester for student recitals or forums. 

Students with an interest in Music Business or research may, in lieu of a senior recital, present a 
significant related project approved by the faculty. Majors must participate in at least one 
performing ensemble as required by their degree prgram. These ensembles serve as laboratories 
for the development of musical skills, knowledge and exposure to method, technique and 
principles of wellness. This requirement helps students become practiced in actual performance 
with the best literature in their ensemble medium. Students interested in teaching music should 

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consult the curriculum for Music Education offered in conjunction with the School of Education. 
However, since some graduates might want to teach in addition to performing in their chosen 
profession, they are advised to complete the minimum courses in education that are required 
for certification. 

Mission of the Music Program 

The Music Program is designed to assist the University in its mission of dedication to the 
pursuit of knowledge and truth, free exchange of ideas and the preservation of the history and 
heritage of music of the African Diaspora. The Music Program accommodates the music needs 
of the community by preparing students to teach in the educational systems, direct music 
programs for churches, and other organizations, direct musical ensembles, conduct, arrange, 
and orchestrate music for bands, choirs, film, and television; perform all types of music; and 
enroll in graduate programs in music. The Program is also designed to provide students with 
opportunities to represent the University by participating in activities on campus, in the 
community, and for the state, national and international audiences. 

Objectives of the Music Program are to: 

1. Accommodate the music needs of the community 

2. Prepare students to teach in the educational system 

3. Prepare students to direct music programs for churches and other organizations 

4. Prepare students to direct/conduct music ensembles 

5. Prepare students to arrange, orchestrate and/or compose music for bands, orchestras, 
choirs, film and television 

6. Prepare students to perform all styles of music 

7. Prepare students to enroll in graduate programs in music 

8. Give students performing opportunities on campus, in the community, and on the state, 
national and international level 

9. Provide students the opportunity to learn music skills 

10. Allow the interaction of students from traditional and nontraditional backgrounds. 

Music Program Student Learning Objectives: 

1. Students will have a general knowledge of music history. Students will be able to 
identify style periods and possible composers (in writing and orally) of Western music 
from the Medieval through the beginning of the 21st century. Students will be able to 
identify historical trends and genres from the African tradition as well as significant 
styles of jazz, pop and religious music. Students will be able to identify cultural and 
historical forces that shaped music and be able to communicate these ideas in oral and 
written form. 

2. Students will have the ability to hear and recognize elements of melody, rhythm, 
harmony, structure and form. 

3. Students will have the ability to sight-sing/read 



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4. Students will have the ability to work with the latest music technologies and the ability 
to apply this knowledge in their field. 

5. Students will have basic keyboard competency (by the end of MUS 104 Class Piano II). 

6. Students will demonstrate ability in their major instrument or voice by successfully 
completing a final performance recital (with the exception of those pursuing the Music 
Education and the Bachelor of Arts in Music degrees) 

Bachelor of Music in 

Church Music 

Graduation Requirements 

This degree program requires a minimum of 121 semester hours for completion and is designed 
primarily for students desirous of becoming directors of music for churches or pursuing 
graduate studies. 

Student Learning Objectives 

Graduates will 

• be able to accompany a congregational hymn 

• be able to make distinguish between gospel (worship) music and contemporary Christian 

Music 

• perform a full recital in their senior year. 



Freshman 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


MAT no 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 


FMU 101 


University 101* 


3 


REA 101 


Critical Think/Read 


or 


MUS 101 


Struct Music I** 


3 


ENG 111 


First Year Lit 


3 


MUS 


Applied Maj Inst 


2 


MUS 102 


Struct of Mus II 


3 


MUS 


Req Ensemble ****" 


1 


MUS 


App Major Instr. *** 


2 


MUS300 


Music Sem/Rec. 





MUS 


Req. Ensemble 


I 








MUS300 


Music Sem/Rec 









L5 






15 



Sophomore 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


3 


MUb311 


Comp and Music 


3 


MUS 209 


Hist of Music I 


3 


MUS 210 


Hist of Music II 


3 


MUS 201 


Struct of Music III 


3 


MUS 203 


Struct Music IV 


3 


MUS 111 


Sig Sing/Ear Tr I 


2 


MUS 112 


Sig Sing/Ear II 


2 


MUS 


App Major Instr. 


2 


MUS 


Applied Maj Inst 


2 


MUS 103 


Class Piano I 


1 


MUS 104 


Class Piano II 


1 


MUS 


Req Ensemble 


1 


MUS 


Req Ensemble 


1 


MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 



15 


MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 




IS 



156 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Junior Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




COM 103 


Intro Pub Speak 


3 


PSY 200 


Intro to Psych 


3 




Hum Elect 


3 


MUS 312 


Conducting 3 




MUS 306 


Spirit&Hyms 


3 


MUS 307 


Spirit Line Hy 


3 


MUS 221 


History III 


3 


MUS 453 


Intro to Church 3 




MUS 


App Major Instr 


2 


MUS 


App Maj Inst 2 




MUS 


Req Ensemble 


1 


MUS 


Req Ensemble 


i 


MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 



15 


MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 



15 


Senior Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENV 101 


Intro to Env Science 


3 




Nat Science Req 


3 


MUB301 


Intro to Music Bus 


3 


MUS 492 


Emotion & Mus 


3 


MUS 302 


Comp/Arran Vocal 


3 


MUS 493/4 


Major Ap Res 


3 


REL 353 


Church Leadership 


3 


MUS_ 


Appr Church Mus 


3 


MUS 


Applied Major Instr 


2 


MUS 


App Major Instr. 


2 


MUS 


Required Ensemble 


1 


MUS 


Req Ensemble 


1 


MUS 300 


Music Sem/Recitals 



15 


MUS 487 


App Music Rec 

16 


1 






^Students over 25 exempt 

Must pass placement test or take MUS 100 

Select from (a)VOCAL: MUS 131, 132, 231, 232 331,332, 431, & 432; (b) KEYBOARD: MUS 131, 
137, 233,234 333, 

334, 433, & 434; (c) BRASSWIND: MUS 135, 136, 235, 236 335, 336, 435, & 436; (d) WOODWIND: 
MUS 145, 146, 245, 

246,348, 350, 447, & 449; (e) STRINGS: MUS 155, 156, 255, 256,355, 356, 455, & 456; (f) 
PERCUSSION: MUS 165, 166, 

265, 266 365, 366, 465, & 466; (g) STEEL: MUS 168,169, 268, 269, 368, 369, 468, & 469. 
****Select from (a) CHOIR: MUS 141, 142, 241, 242, 341, 342, 441, & 442; (B)BAND/ORCHESTRA: 
MUS 131, 162, 

261,262,361,362,461, & 462; (c) JAZZ ENSEMBLE: MUS 171, 173, 271, 273, 371, 372, 471, & 472; 
(d) POP ENSEMBLE: 

MUS 180, 182, 281, 282, 381, 382, 481, & 482; (e) STEEL ENSEMBLE: MUS 185, 186, 285, 286, 385, 
386, 485, & 486; (f) 

MUSIC PRODUCTION WORKSHOP: MUS 196, 197, 296, 297, 396, 397, 496, & 497. 
*****Mandatory for all Music majors 
-Select from available courses with permission of advisor 



157 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog. 



Bachelor of Music in 

Jazz Studies 

Graduation Requirements 

This degree program requires a minimum of 121 semester hours for completion and is designed 
primarily for students who wish to continue as professional jazz musicians or to pursue 
graduate studies. 

Student Learning Objectives 

Graduates will 

• be able to identify jazz styles of various genres 

• be able to analyze chord progressions as related to jazz style and music. 

• perform a full recital in their senior year. 



Freshman 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


Coll Writing II 


3 


MAT 110 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 


FMU 101 


University 101* 


3 


REA 101 


Crit Think/Reading or 


3 


MUS101 


Struct of Music I** 


3 


ENG 111 


First Year Lit 




MUS _ 


App Major Instr. *** 


i 


MUS 102 


Struct of Mus II 


3 


MUS 


Req Ensemble **** 


1 


MUS 


App Major Instr. 


2 


MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 





MUS_ 


Req Ensemble 


1 








MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 









is 






15 



Sophomore 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


3 


MUB311 


Comp and Mus 


3 


MUS 209 


Hist of Music I 


3 


MUS 210 


Hist of Music II 


3 


MUS 201 


Struct of Music III 


3 


MUS 203 


Struct of Mus IV 


3 


MUS 111 


Sig Sing/Ear Tr I 


2 


MUS 112 


Sig Sg/Ear Tr II 


2 


MUS 


App Major Instr 


2 


MUS 


App Major Inst 


2 


MUS 103 


Class Piano I 


1 


MUS 104 


Class Piano II 


1 


MUS 


Req Ensemble 


1 


MUS 


Req Ensemble 


1 


MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 


1) 
L5 


MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 


I) 
15 


Junior Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




COM 103 


Intro Pub Speak 


3 


PSY 200 


Intro to Psycho 


3 




Humanities Elect 


3 


MUS 312 


Conducting 


3 


MUS 207 


Jazz Imp & Ar I 


3 


MUS 208 


Jazz Imp Ar II 


3 


MUS 221 


Hist of Music III 


3 


MUS 364 


History of Jazz 


3 


MUS 


App Major Instr 


2 


MUS 


App Maj Inst 


2 


MUS 


Req Ensemble 


1 


MUS 


Req Ensemble 


1 


MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 





MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 






158 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



L5 



15 



Senior Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENV101 


Intro Envi Scie 


3 




Natural Science Req 


3 


MUB301 


Intro Music Bus 


3 


MUS 311 


Big Band Arrang 


3 


MUS315 


Small EnsArrang 


3 


MUS 493/4 


Maj App Res 


3 


MUS_ 


Jazz Studies Elec 


3 


MUS_ 


Appr Jazz Studies 


3 


MUS 


App Major Instr. 


2 


MUS 


Applied Maj Inst 


2 


MUS 


Req Ensemble 


1 


MUS 


Req Ensemble 


1 


MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 




13 


MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 


1 
16 



^Students over 25 exempt 

** Must pass placement test or take MUS 100 

"-Select from (a)VOCAL: MUS 131, 132, 231, 232 331,332, 431, & 432; (b) KEYBOARD: MUS 131, 137, 

233,234 333, 334, 433, & 434; (c) BRASSWIND: MUS 135, 136, 235, 236 335, 336, 435, & 436; (d) WOODWIND: 

MUS 145, 146, 245, 246,348, 350, 447, & 449; (e) STRINGS: MUS 155, 156, 255, 256,355, 356, 

455, & 456; (f) PERCUSSION: MUS 165, 166, 265, 266 365, 366, 465, & 466; (g) STEEL: MUS 168,169, 

268, 269, 368, 369, 468, & 469. 

""Select from (a) CHOIR: MUS 141, 142, 241, 242, 341, 342, 441, & 442; (B)BAND/ORCHESTRA: 

MUS 131, 162, 261,262,361,362,461, & 462; (c) JAZZ ENSEMBLE: MUS 171, 173, 271, 273, 371, 372, 471, 

& 472; (d) POP ENSEMBLE: MUS 180, 182, 281, 282, 381, 382, 481, & 482; (e) STEEL ENSEMBLE: 

MUS 185, 186, 285, 286, 385, 386, 485, & 486; (f) MUSIC 

Bachelor of Arts in 

Music 

Graduation Requirements 

This degree program requires a minimum of 121 semester hours for completion and is designed 
for students who wish to pursue graduate studies or careers in musical theater, music therapy, 
the recording industry management, or music business. Students take 18 elective credits in a 
minor area of their choice. Students should check with the respective departments on minor 
requirements in their chosen field of study. 



Student Learning Objectives 

Graduates will 

demonstrate a general knowledge of music history 

demonstrate the ability to recognize elements of melody, rhythm, harmony, 

structure and form in both aural and written form 

demonstrate the ability to sight-sing and to sight-read 

demonstrate the ability to work with the latest music technologies and to apply this 

knowledge in their field 

demonstrate basic keyboard competency 

complete a final performance recital demonstrating an acceptable level of 

proficiency with their major instrument or voice. 



159 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Freshman Y 


ear 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing 1 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


MAT 110 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 


FMU 101 


University 101* 


3 


REA 101 


Crit Think/Reading or 


3 


MUS 101 


Struct of Music I** 


3 


ENG 111 


First Year Lit. 




MUS_ 


App Major Instr. *** 


2 


MUS 102 


Struct Mus II 


3 


MUS 


Req Ensemble **** 


1 


MUS 


App Major Instr. 


2 


MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 





MUS_ 


Req Ensemble 


1 








MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 









L5 






L5 



Sophomore 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


3 


MUB 3 1 1 


Comp & Music 


3 


MUS 209 


History of Music I 


3 


MUS 210 


Hist of Music II 


3 


MUS 201 


Struct of Music III 


3 


MUS 203 


Sturcof MusIV 


3 


MUS 111 


Sig Sing/Ear Tr I 


2 


MUS 112 


Sig Sing/Ear Tr I 


2 


MUS 


App Major Instr. 


2 


MUS 


App Major Instr. 


: 


MUS 103 


Class Piano I 


1 


MUS 104 


Class Piano II 


l 


MUS 


Required Ensemble 


1 


MUS 


Req Ensemble 


i 


MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 


Q 
15 


MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 


IS 



Junior Year 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



COM 103 


Intro to Pub Speak 


3 


PSY 200 


Intro to Psy 


3 




Humanities Req 


3 


MUS 312 


Conducting 


3 




Foreign Lang Req I 


3 




Foreign Lang II 


3 


MUS 221 


Hist of Music III 


3 


MUS 370 


Hist of Pop Mus 


3 


MUS_ 


App Major Instr. 


2 




Second Area Elect 


3 


MUS_ 


Ensemble Elective 


1 


MUS_ 


Ensemble Elective 


I 


MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 



IS 


MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 



16 


Senior Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 





ENV101 Intro to Env Sci 
MUB 301 Intro Music Bus 

Second Area Elective 
Second Area Elective 
Second Area Elective 
MUS 300 Music Sem/Rec 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

IS 



MUS 493/4 
MUS 



MUS 300 



Nat Science Req 
Second Area Elect 
Maj App Res 
Appr Pop Mus 
Second Area Elect 
Music Sem/Rec 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



"Students over 25 exempt 

** Must pass placement test or take MUS 100 

***Select from (a) VOCAL: MUS 131, 132, 231, 232 331,332, 431, & 432; (b) KEYBOARD: MUS 

131, 137, 



160 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



233,234 333, 334, 433, & 434; (c) BRASSWIND: MUS 135, 136, 235, 236 335, 336, 435, & 436; (d) 

WOODWIND: 

MUS 145, 146, 245, 246,348, 350, 447, & 449; (e) STRINGS: MUS 155, 156, 255, 256,355, 356, 

455, & 456; (f) PERCUSSION: MUS 165, 166, 265, 266 365, 366, 465, & 466; (g) STEEL: MUS 

168,169, 

268, 269, 368, 369, 468, & 469. 

****Select from (a) CHOIR: MUS 141, 142, 241, 242, 341, 342, 441, & 442; (B)BAND/ORCHESTRA: 

MUS 131, 162, 261,262,361,362,461, & 462; (c) JAZZ ENSEMBLE: MUS 171, 173, 271, 273, 371, 

372, 471, 

& 472; (d) POP ENSEMBLE: MUS 180, 182, 281, 282, 381, 382, 481, & 482; (e) STEEL ENSEMBLE: 

MUS 185, 186, 285, 286, 385, 386, 485, & 486; (f) MUSIC PRODUCTION WORKSHOP: MUS 196, 

197, 

296, 297, 396, 397, 496, & 497. 

"^"""""Mandatory for all Music majors 

Minor in Music 

The minor in music requires at least 18 credits from the following categories: 

THEORY/COMPOSITION/ARRANGING (six credits) 

MUS 100 Fundamentals of Music 3 

MUS 101 Structures of Music I 3 

MUS 102 Structures of Music II 3 

MUS 201 Structures of Music III 3 

MUS 203 Structures of Music IV 3 

MUS 207 Jazz Improvisation & Arranging I 3 

MUS 208 Jazz Improvisation & Arranging II 3 

MUS 302 Composition & Arranging for Vocal 3 

MUS 315 Small Ensemble Arranging 3 

MUS 394 Jazz Improvisation & Arranging 3 

HISTORY (three credits) 

MUS 200 Music Appreciation 3 

MUS 209 History of Music I - Western Music 3 
MUS 210 History of Music II-African Diaspora 3 

MUS 221 History of Music III- World Music 3 

MUS 364 History of Jazz 3 

MUS 370 History of Popular Music 3 

MUS 444 Steel Pan Making & Tuning 3 

MUS 453 Introduction to Church Music 3 

Music Elective (three credits) 

Students may choose any MUS course or combination of MUS courses with the permission 

of faculty and/or once the necessary prerequisites are satisfied 

APPLIED PRINCIPAL (four credits) 

ONE CREDIT: Select from (a)VOCAL : MUS 113; (b) KEYBOARD: MUS 113 (c) BRASSWIND: MUS 131, (d) 
WOODWIND: MUS 113; (e) STRINGS: MUS 113; (f) PERCUSSION: MUS 113; (g) STEEL: MUS 300 

161 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



TWO CREDITS: Select from (a) VOCAL: MUS MUS 131, 132, 231, 232, 331,332, 431, & 432; (b) KEYBOARD: MUS 
131, 137, 233,234 333, 334, 433, & 434; (c) BRASSWIND: MUS 135, 136, 235,236 335, 336, 435, & 436; (d) WOODWIND: 
145, 146, 245, 246 348, 350, 447, & 449; (e) STRINGS: MUS 155, 156, 255, 256 355, 356, 455, & 456; (f) PERCUSSION: 
MUS 165, 166, 265, 266 365, 366, 465, & 466; (g) STEEL: MUS 168,169, 268, 269. 368, 369, 468, & 469. 

ENSEMBLE (two credits) 

Select from (a) CHOIR: MUS 141, 142, 241, 242, 341, 342, 441, & 442; 

(B)BAND/ORCHESTRA: MUS 131, 162, 261,262,361,362,461, & 462; (c) JAZZ ENSEMBLE: MUS 171, 173, 271, 273, 371, 

372, 471, & 472; (d) POP ENSEMBLE: MUS 181, 182, 281, 282, 381, 382, 481, & 482; (e) STEEL ENSEMBLE: MUS 185, 

186, 285, 286, 385, 386, 485, & 486; (f) MUSIC PRODUCTION WORKSHOP: MUS 196, 197, 296, 297, 396, 397, 496, & 

497. 

Elective Studies in Music 

Students pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in Music degree may undertake elective studies in 
Music Business, Music Technology, Church Music, Jazz Studies, Vocal, or Instrumental Music. 
Students should check with their advisors for the suggested courses in each of these areas. 

Elective Studies in Music Business 

These courses serve as a foundation for careers in the music industry and or the pursuit of 
graduate studies. This area requires 18 credits in addition to MUB 301- Introduction to Music 
Business and MUB 311- Computers and Music. 

CORE REQUIREMENTS (12 Credits) 

ACC 211 Principles of Accounting 3 BUS 211 Principles of Management 3 

ECO 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 or ECO 202 Principles of Microeconomics 3 

FIN 301 Business Finance 3 

ELECTIVES (6 Credits chosen from the following course) 

MUB 331 Copyright & Publishing 3 or BUS 31 1 Business Law 3 

BUS 320 Business Statistics 3 MAR 301 Principles of Marketing 3 

BUS 400 Entrepreneurship 3 

Minor in Visual Arts 

A Visual Arts minor provides for the study of art. The minor is planned by students and their 
academic Visual Arts advisor to include a minimum of 18 credit hours of art courses. The 
planned minor will consist of 6 credit hours in Art History to be taken from among the 
following courses: ART 101, ART 104, ARH 320, and a minimum of 12 credit hours of Art Studio 
courses to be taken from among the following courses: ART 121, ART 131, ART 231, ART 241, 
ART 341. Students with extensive art training may be advised to consider the upper level 
studio art courses: ART 221, ART 321, ART 331, ART 421. 

CORE REQUIREMENTS 

6 credit hours of art history 

ART 101 Art History 3 

ART 104 Modern Art 3 

162 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



15 credit hours of studio art 

ART 121 Beginning Design 3 

ART 131 Drawing I 3 

ART 231 Painting I 3 

ART 241 Printmaking I 3 

ART 341 Sculpture 3 

SUPPLEMENTAL COURSE OFFERINGS 

18 credit hours of supplemental art courses 
ART 103 African American Art 3 
ART 221 Graphic Design I 3 

ART 321 Commercial Art 3 

ART 331 Mural Painting 3 

ART 421 Illustration 3 

Bachelor of Arts in 

Interdisciplinary Studies 

The Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies is designed for working adults. This degree 
provides students with several options and includes courses that span across disciplines. This 
program not only addresses career interests and goals but also personal interests and prior 
pursuits that the students may have experienced. 

Students who benefit from a program with cross-discipline options are those that are working 
professionals who need a degree for career advancement or as a means to capture prior 
coursework in a program earned at other institutions of higher education. 

To be accepted into the Interdisciplinary Studies program students must: 

• Be working adults 

• Apply to the dean, School of Arts and Sciences 

• Submit a written statement of goals for the interdisciplinary studies program and 

• Select a track within a discipline for area of focus. 

The application will be reviewed by an Interdisciplinary Program Committee, which will make 
recommendation upon approval to the dean. The Interdisciplinary Studies program 
requirement will be approved by an Interdisciplinary Program Committee. The degree plan 
consists of: 

Core Curriculum 50 credits 

Business Required Core Courses 12 credits 

Humanities Required Core Courses 9 credits 

Social Sciences 12 credits 
Senior Project 3 credits 

Elected Discipline Track 36 credits 

Total Credits for Degree Completion 122 credits 



163 



Florida Manorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Year One 

Courses * Course Title 
ENG 101 College Writing 1 
MAT 1 10 Intermediate Algebra 
REA 101 Critical Thinking and 
Reading OR 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 



l\C, ill 


First Year Literature 


3 


REL 101 


Intro. To Religion 


3 


ENG 102 
MAT 1 1 1 

CSC 101 
PED 1 10 


College Writing II 
College Algebra 
Natural Science Req. 
Intro. To Computers 
Dimension of Wellness 


3 
3 
3 
3 
2 


Total Credits 


2b 


Year Two 






Courses - 


Course Title 


Credits 


COM 103 


Intro to Public Speaking 


3 




Humanities Req. 


3 


HIS 103 


African American Hist. 
I or II 


3 


BUS 211 


Foreign Language I 
Natural Science Req. 
Social Science Req. 
History/Government Req. 
Foreign Language II 
Intro to Management 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 




Elected Track A, B, or C 


3 



Total Credits 


30 


Year Three 




Courses - 


Course Title 


Credits 


HRM 350 


Human Resource Mgmt. 


3 


COM 306 


Business & Prof. Speaking 


3 


PAD 301 


Con & Iss in Pub Admin 


3 


ENG 309 


Adv. Grammar & Com 


3 


POL 338 


Admin of Social Services 


3 


BUS 344 


Business Org & Mgmt 


3 




Elected Track A, B, C 


3 


BUS 394 


Business Ethic & Society 


3 


PAD 302 


Management of Urban Govt. 


3 


SSC 300 


Research Methods 


3 





Elected Track A, B, or C 


3 


Total Credits 


3 b 



V 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Year Four 



Courses ~ Course Title 

COM 308 Voice & Diction 
Elected Track A, B, 

Elected Track A, B, 

Elected Track A, B, 

Elected Track A, B, 

Elected Track A, B, 

Elected Track A, B, 

Elected Track A, B, 

Elected Track A, B, 

Senior Project* 

Total Credits 





Credits 




3 


orC 


3 


or C 


3 


or C 


3 


orC 


3 


or C 


3 


or C 


3 


or C 


3 


or C 


3 




3 



30 



Senior Project must coincide with the student's declared discipline track. 

• Track A - Bus 498 • Track B- Eng 495, REL 405, MUS 493 • Track C - 5SC 423 



Elected Discipline Tracks 



Business Track (A) 

Choose (1) Discipline Senior Project: BUS 49S* 



ACC 211 Principles of Accounting 1 

ACC 212 Principles of Accounting II 

BUS 311 Business Law I 

BUS 312 Business Law II 

BUS 345 Business Comm. & Tech. Writing 

BUS 353 Principles of Insurance 



BUS 355 Principles of Real Estate 

BUS 450 Business Internship & Seminar 

BUS 403 Strategic Management 

BUS 487 Business Seminar 

FIN 301 Business Finance 

MAR 301 Principles of Marketing 



""Students that elect the Business Track, are required to meet prerequisite courses in order to be 
eligible to enroll in BUS 498 Senior Project: MAR 301-Principles of Marketing, ACC 211- 
Principles of Accounting I, ACC 212-Principles of Accounting II, FIN 301-Business Finance, and 
BUS 403 - Strategic Management 



Humanities 

Choose (1) Discipline Senior Project: Track B- Eng 495, REL 405, MUS 493 

Languages, Literature & Composition 



ENG 300-465 English Literature & Composition 
SPA 301- 407 Spanish Literature & Composition 



FRE 301- 448 French Literature & Composition 
COM 407 - Grant Writing 



Music 



MUB 301 Intro to Music Business 



MUB 311 Computers and Music MUS 302 - MUS 499 



37 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Religion 



REL 302 Survey of the Testament 

REL 322 Christian History 

REL 353 Church Leadership 

REL 432 Christian Ethics 

REL 406 Internship II 



REL 310 The Psalms 

REL 324 Intertestamental Period 

REL 401 Christian Education 

REL 434 Life of Christ 

REL 420 Lntemship in Religion Educ 

Social Sciences (TRACK C) 



REL 313 Life & Letters of Paul 



REL 351 
REL 431 
REL 405 



Pastoral Ministry 
Bible Ethics 
Internship I 



Choose minimum of two courses from each discipline Senior Project: SSC 423* 

^Students that elect the Social Sciences Track, are required to meet prerequisite courses in order 
to be eligible to enroll in SSC 423 Senior Project: SSC 300-Research Methods, PSY 312/SSC 302- 
Intro to Statistics and ENG 309 - Advanced Grammar and Composition. 

Criminal Tustice 



CRJ306 Probation & Parole 

CRJ 305 Confinement Facilities 

CR] 403 Police Administration 

CRJ 406 Senior Seminar 

CRJ 422 Field Placement II 



CRJ 304 Causes & Pre of Delinquency 

CRJ 306 Correctional Philosophy & Services 

CRJ 405 Law Enforcement 

CRJ 421 Field Placement I 



Public Administration/Political Science 

PAD 301 Concepts & Issues of Pub Administration 

PAD 303 Principles of Public Planning 

PAD 306 Administrative Behavior 

POL 302 State and Local Government 

POL 334 Public Personnel Administration 

Sociology 



PAD 302 Mgmt of Urban Government 

PAD 305 FL Law & Public Governance 

PAD 401 Mgmt of State Government 

POL 333 Politics of Governmental Finance 

POL 403 Mgmt of Federal Government 



SOC 303 Social Problems 

SOC 307 Community Organization 

SOC 402 Racial and Cultural Groups 

SOC 431 Seminar in Drug Abuse 

SSC 420 Field Placement II 



SOC 305 Group Dynamics 

SOC 309 Sociology of Deviance 

SOC 403 Marriage and Family 

SSC 419 Field Placement I 



162 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



School of 

BUSINESS 

Florida Memorial University, through its School of Business, is accredited by the Association of 
Collegiate Business Schools and Programs to offer the following business degrees: 

• The Bachelor of Science in Accounting 

• The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 

• The Bachelor of Science in Finance 

• The Bachelor of Science in Marketing 

Students can also participate in a Dual Hospitality Management program with Florida 
International University. 

The objective of the Florida Memorial University/Florida International University (FIU) 
Hospitality Management Program is to provide students the opportunity to obtain the Bachelor 
of Science Degree in Business Administration from Florida Memorial and the Bachelor of 
Science or the Master of Science Degree in Hospitality Management from FIU. 

Minors are also offered in Business Administration, Finance, and Marketing. Eighteen 
additional credit hours with a grade of "C" or better are required beyond core courses for a 
minor. Students should consult with the Dean as soon as the decision to pursue a minor has 
been made. An agreement about specific courses to satisfy the minor requirements must be 
made during the application process. Students selecting a minor must adhere to the same 
entrance requirements as they would for a major. Students selecting a major or minor in the 
area need to have a strong background in mathematics. 

The School offers opportunities to students to enhance their studies through professional 
experiences. 

School Mission Statement 

The essential aspects of the University's Institutional Statement of Purpose drive the mission of 
the School of Business that is formulated in the mission and goals for each degree-granting 
program. 

GOALS OF THE SCHOOL 

1. To develop in students an awareness and understanding of the role of business and 
economics in our society 



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2. To assist students in acquiring the ability to use business and economic analysis as a 
major tool in making independent, well considered judgments on important public 
issues 

3. To provide specialized training for students who wish to pursue careers as managers 
and owners of business enterprises 

4. To provide a fundamental background in the areas of business and economics theories 
for students who wish to pursue advanced study 

5. To perform research and disseminate knowledge for the advancement of techniques in 
the conduct of business affairs 

6. To focus on programs which inspire greater entrepreneurial activities and contribution 
to the business and economic life of the community, state, and nation 

7. To continually re-examine the curriculum to see if it conforms to current needs of 
business and industry 

8. To enhance students' critical thinking and effective communication capabilities 

9. To provide students with the opportunity for cooperative education, internship 
experience, and professional development 

10. To analyze components of international business, including international trade and 
investment, foreign exchange, financial markets, and political and cultural interactions 
between multinational organizations and host countries. 

Graduation Requirements 

1. Complete a minimum of 122 semester hours with a minimum cumulative G.P.A. of at 
least 2.00. 

2. Meet all Florida Memorial University course requirements in the area of specialization. 

3. Receive grade of "C" or better in all School of Business Administration courses. 

4. Successfully complete BUS 498 Senior Project in Business, or other designated Senior 
Project courses. 

Dual-Hospitality Management Program 

This program establishes a cooperative Hospitality Management agreement between Florida 
Memorial University and Florida International University. The resources of each institution are 
utilized to form a Dual Degree program of study to increase the number of hospitality industry 
professionals. The Dual-Hospitality Management degrees will be awarded only upon the 
successful fulfillment and completion of prescribed admission and course requirements at both 
institutions. 



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The objectives of the program are as follows: 

The objectives of the Florida Memorial University/Florida International University Hospitality 
program are: 

1. To provide students with the best of two college worlds 

2. To provide avenues of study in hospitality management 

3. To provide opportunity for graduate school 

4. To increase the participation of minorities in the hospitality industry. 

Program of Study 

The objective of the FMU/FIU Hospitality Management Program is to provide students the 
opportunity to obtain within approximately four to six years, the Bachelor of Science Degree in 
Business Administration from Florida Memorial University and the Bachelor or Master of 
Science Degree in Hospitality Management from FIU. 

Dual Degree students will be required to complete a three-year study program for a minimum 
of 98 semester hours at Florida Memorial University. Contingent upon satisfactory completion 
of Florida Memorial University requirements, students will be admitted as a full-time 
Hospitality Management student at FIU with completed junior standing and accepted as a 
senior. Upon admission to FIU, students are given three options from which to choose. These 
options are 

Option One : Students will complete a one-year/24 credit hours program at FIU. Upon 
successful completion of the first 24 semester hours at FIU, students will receive a Bachelor of 
Science degree in Business Administration from Florida Memorial University. After completion 
of Option One, students may select Option Two or Three. 

Option Two : Upon successful completion of the FIU Bachelor's degree program requirements, 
students will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Hospitality Management. All general 
education requirements must be met, the CLAS exam must be passed and the minimum 
hospitality-related work hours must be documented in order to receive the FIU Bachelor's 
degree. ( Upon successful completion of the first 24 semesters at FIU, students will receive a 
Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from Florida Memorial University ). 

Option Three : Upon successful completion of the Bachelor of Science degree in Business 
Administration from Florida Memorial University, students are eligible to apply for admission 
to the graduate program in the FIU School of Hospitality Management. To be admitted, 
students must have maintained a "B" average in all upper-level work and attained a minimum 
GRE score of 1000 (verbal + quantitative sections only) or a GMAT score of 500. Upon 
successful completion of the master's degree program requirements, students will receive the 
Master of Science degree in Hospitality Management or Master of Science degree in Tourism 

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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Studies, depending on which program they choose. ( Students choosing the Tourism Studies 
degree will have additional prerequisite courses to complete). 

Transfer 

Florida Memorial University students transferring to FIU must complete the State University 
System application for admission. In addition, official transcripts from Florida Memorial 
University and any other institutions attended must be submitted. 

International students must provide appropriate financial documents in order to receive the 
Certificate of Student Visa Eligibility (1-20 Form). Students should contact the Office of 
Admissions at FIU regarding the amount of money which must be documented. 

Requirements 



Admission Requirements to the Florida Memorial/FIU Dual Degree Program: 

1. Must have Florida Memorial University approval 

2. Must be in good standing at Florida Memorial University 

3. Must meet Florida Memorial School of Business requirements for admission to the upper- 
level 

4. Must have expressed a desire to major in hospitality management 

Transfer Requirements from the FMU/FIU Dual Degree Program to FIU: 

1. Must have a cumulative GPA of no less than 2.5 

2. Must have completed a minimum of 98 transferable semester hours 

3. The following course credits must be included in the 98 semester hours accumulated at 
Florida Memorial University. These course credits represent the new CORE Curriculum FIU 
will adopt beginning Fall 2003. 

The following FIU courses have been currently approved for the CORE. 

Florida Memorial University 
ENG101;ENG102 
REL101 +ENG309 
HIS 200 

LANGUAGE I, II or ** 
ECO 201 or 202 
SSC 101 or 102 
BIO 101 
PSC 101 
MAT 102 
BUS 320 
MUS 200 



Course 




Semester Credit 


English Composition* 




6 


Humanities or Literature and 




3 


History w/ Writing 




3 


Foreign Language ** 




6-10 


Social Science 




6 


Life Science 




3 


Physical Science 




3 


Math * (College Algebra or Hi 


gher) 


3 


Statistics (or Higher Level of Math) 


3 


Art 




3 



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* Grade of "C" or better is required. 

** Two years of same language in high school or two semesters in college will satisfy the FIU 

foreign language requirement. 

Financial Aid 

Students who need financial aid while in the program at Florida Memorial University must 
apply to the designated official at Florida Memorial University. Students seeking financial aid 
at FIU must apply through FIU's Financial Aid Office. Priority Deadline to Apply is March 1 st . 

FIU agrees to provide four Scholarships or Non-Resident Tuition Waivers for African-American 
Florida Memorial University students who are admitted to the Hospitality Management 
program. Scholarship recipients must be a U.S. citizen or U.S. resident. Non-resident Tuition 
Waivers are available for Non-Florida residents and foreign students. The Scholarships and 
Tuition Waivers are competitive and amount to $1500 per student annually. 

Bachelor of Science in 

Accounting 

Mission of the Accounting Program 

The mission of the Accounting program is to prepare students for professional careers in public 
accounting, private industry accounting, and governmental accounting. The program also 
prepares students for graduate schools and programs. 

The goals of the program are as follows: 

1. To help students achieve a level of accounting knowledge and critical thinking skills 
appropriate for accounting professionals 

2. To help students achieve a minimum level of effective communication skills appropriate for 
accounting professionals 

3. To assist students in acquiring the ability to use technology in making professional business 
decisions and presentations 

4. To provide qualified accounting graduates to the public, private, and governmental sectors 

5. To provide a fundamental background in the area of accounting theories for students who 
wish to pursue advanced study 

6. To promote research and dissemination of knowledge of developments in the accounting 
profession 

7. To encourage student interaction with the accounting profession 

8. To teach analysis of the financial accounting and reporting issues faced by multinational 
companies and the financial reporting principles and practices in countries other than the 
U.S. 



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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catal og 



Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) 

SLOl. Students should understand the basic accounting concepts essential to recording 
business transactions and preparing & analyzing financial statements. (ACC 211 and ACC 
212) 

SL02. Students should be able to analyze and interpret data for managerial controlling, 
planning and decision making; including demonstrating competency with the procedures 
and principles of managerial and cost accounting. (ACC 352 and ACC 452) 
SL03. Students should be familiar with the theory and practice of accounting for businesses, 
including business combination, multinational enterprises, and government and not-for- 
profit entities. (ACC 311, ACC 312, ACC 411, ACC454, ACC455, ACC 461, ACC 487) 
SLOl. Students should demonstrate knowledge of business law, auditing principles and 
attestation of standards and procedures.(BUS311, BUS312, ACC431, ACC432) 
SL05. Students should demonstrate knowledge of federal income taxation for the 
preparation of a comprehensive income tax return for individuals and businesses. (ACC434, 
ACC435) 

Graduation Requirements 

This degree program requires at least 122 semester hours for completion. 



Freshman 


Year 










I irst Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


MAT 110 


Intermediate Algebra 3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 




Natural Science Req. 


3 




Natural Science 


3 


FMU 101 


University 


3 


COM 103 


Intro to Public Speaking 


3 


REA 101 


Critical Thin & Read 


3 


HIS 


African Amer History I or II 


3 


ENG 111 


First Year Lit. 




REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


3 


PMM li' 


Dim. of Wellness 


2 

17 






IS 


Sophomore Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ACC 211 


Prin. of Acct. I 


3 


ACC 212 


Prin. of Acct. II 


3 


201 


For. Lan. Req. 


3 


ECO 202 


Prin. of Micro Eco 


3 


ECO 201 


Prin. of Macro Eco. 


3 


202 


Foreign Lan. Req. 


3 


CSC 101 


Intro to Computers 


3 


BUS 215 


Quant Methods for Business 


3 





Social Science Req. 


3 
15 


BUS 211 


Principles of Management 
Humanities Req. 


3 
3 

IcS 



Junior Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 




ACC311 


Inter. Accounting I 


3 


ACC 312 


Intermediate Accounting II 


3 


BUS320 


Business Statistics I 


3 


BUS 321 


Business Statistics II 


3 


BUS311 


Business Law I 


3 


BUS 312 


Business Law II 


3 


MAR301 


Prin. of Mktg. 


3 


BUS 394 


Business Ethics & Society 


3 


FIN301 


Prin. of Finance 


3 
15 





History/Gov Requirement 


3 

IS 



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Senior Year 

First Semester Second Semester 

ACC411 Adv. Accounting 3 ACC452 Cost Accounting 3 

ACC434 Fed. Income Tax I 3 Approved Acct. Elec* 3 

BUS 450 Bus. Intern. & Sem. 3 ACC454 Comp. Accounting (Sr Proj) 3 

ACC431 Auditing I 3 BUS420 Operations Research 3 

12 12 

* Approved Accounting Electives are: 

ACC 432 Auditing II 3 

ACC 435 Federal Income Tax II 3 

ACC 455 International Accounting 3 

ACC 461 Governmental & Nonprofit Ace 3 

ACC 487 Seminar in Accounting 3 
""Electives could be recommended and approved by the Advisor 

Bachelor of Science in 

Business Administration 

Mission of the Business Administration Program 

The mission of the Business Administration program emphasizes management studies. It is 
designed to direct students toward an integrated approach to modern management, theory and 
practice, the changing nature of management, management in a changing global environment, 
and creative problem solving. The approved electives provide career options in Finance, 
Marketing, and International Business. 

The goals of the program are as follows: 

1. To explain the relationship between human resources management and other functions 
within the organization 

2. To analyze the different sub-functions that are critical to the success of any organization 

3. To describe the strategic importance of human resources in today's global economy 

4. To explain the steps needed to create and launch a new business 

5. To integrate theory and practical business experiences needed to enhance the chances for 
success of a new business 

6. To analyze the components needed to strategically align an organization with its 
environment 

7. To explain the relationships of the functional areas within a business 

8. To analyze models of rational decision-making used in an organization 

9. To apply management concepts to organizations operating in an international arena 

10. To analyze components of international business, to include international trade and 
investment, foreign exchange, financial markets, and political and cultural interactions 
between multinational organizations and host countries 



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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) 

SLOl. Students should demonstrate knowledge of management history, principles, theories, 

techniques, concepts, and models in making business decisions in both domestic and 

international arenas. 
SL02. Students should understand the general business theories, principles, concepts, and the 

steps needed to create and launch a new business. 
SL03. Students should be exposed to professional work experience and on the job training in 

the business sector. 
SL04. Students should demonstrate competence in all areas of business in the capstone. 
SL05. Students should be able to apply mathematical principles, theories, techniques, 

concepts, methodology, and models of rational decision making in business. 
SL06. Students should demonstrate effective communication skills. 
SL07. Students should be able to apply the general principles, theories, techniques, concepts, 

methodology, and models of accounting, economics, finance, and marketing in making 

business decisions. 



Freshman Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


MAT 110 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 




Natural Science Req. 


3 




Natural Science Req. 


3 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3 


COM 103 


Intro, to Public Spk. 


3 


REA 101 


Critical Thinking & Read or 


3 


HIS 


African Amer History I or II 


3 


ENG111 


First Year Literature 




REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


3 


PED110 


Dimension of Wellness 


2 
17 






is 


Sophomore 


Year 










First Semes 


tor 




Second Semester 




ACC211 


Principles of Accounting I 


3 


ACC212 


Prin. of Acct. 


3 


201 


Foreign Language Req. 


3 


ECO 202 


Prin. of Micro 


3 


ECO 201 


Principles of Macro 


3 


202 


Foreign Lan. Req. 


3 


CSC 101 


Intro to Computers 


3 


BUS 215 


Quant Methods for Bus. 


3 





Social Science Requirement 


3 
15 


BUS 211 


Prin. of Management 
Humanities Req. 


3 
3 

IS 



Junior Year 
First Semester 

BUS 320 Business Statistics I 

BUS 311 Business Law I 

MAR 301 Principles of Marketing 

ECO 371 Money & Capital Markets 

History/Gov Requirement 

FIN 301 Principles of Finance 





Second Semester 




3 


BUS 321 


Business Statistics II 


3 


3 


HRM 350 


Human Resource Mgmnt 


3 


3 


BUS 394 


Business Ethics & Society 


3 


3 
3 


ACC 352 


Managerial Accounting 


3 


3 

18 






I 



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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Senior Year 






First Semester 




BUS 450 


Business Intern. & Seminar 


3 


BUS 403 


Strategic Management 


3 


BUS 404 


International Business 


3 




Approved Business Elective* 


3 



Second Semester 

BUS 420 Operations Research 

Approved Business Elective* 

BUS 361 Leadership Applications 
BUS 498 Senior Project in Business 



12 



3 
3 
3 
3 
12 



Approved electives are (ACQ BUS, MAR, CSC): 



ACC Accounting Elective 3 

BUS 210 Applied Mathematics in Business 3 

BUS 240 Intro to Hospitality Management 3 

BUS 310 Business Mathematics 3 

BUS 312 Business Law II 3 

BUS 344 Business Organization & Management 3 

BUS 345 Business Comm & Tech Writing 3 

BUS 353 Principles of Insurance 3 

BUS 355 Principles of Real Estate 3 

BUS 400 Entrepreneurship 3 

BUS 480 Managerial Psychology 3 

BUS 487 Seminar in Management 3 

FIN 323 Corporate Finance 3 

FIN 333 Investment 3 

FIN 350 Principles of Financial Planning 3 

FIN 493 Portfolio Analysis & Management 3 

FIN 495 Futures & Options Markets 3 

FIN 496 Financial Statement Analysis 3 

FIN 497 International Money & Finance 3 

FIN Finance Elective 3 

HRM Human Resource Management Elective 3 

MAR 361 Retail Marketing 3 

MAR 362 Personal Selling 3 

MAR 363 Direct Marketing Management 3 

MAR 395 Consumer Behavior 3 

MAR 460 Advertising 3 

MAR 461 Marketing Channels 3 

MAR 462 International Marketing 3 

MAR 463 Survey of E- Commerce 3 

MAR 490 Service Marketing 3 

MAR 495 Marketing Research 3 

MAR 487 Seminar in Marketing 3 

CSC Computer Elective (beyond CSC 101) 3 



*Electives could be recommended and approved by the advisor. 



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Bachelor of Science in 

Finance 



Mission of the Finance Program 

The mission of the Finance program is to provide students with knowledge of the major 
concepts and practices of financial management, while at the same time helping to develop their 
analytical, decision-making, and communication abilities. The Finance program will also 
provide students with learning opportunities, that reflect the current state of knowledge and 
practice within the field; and the program will prepare students for careers in finance and other 
business areas, and provide them with the opportunity to pursue graduate studies. 

I ho goaK oi the program are as follows: 

1. To provide an understanding of the theoretical foundations of finance 

2. To produce students who are able to communicate effectively in oral presentations and 
in writing. 

3. To train students to apply quantitative skills to business problems 

4. To assist students in acquiring the ability to use technology in making finance and 
business decisions. 

5. To ensure an understanding of the basic concepts and principles of other areas in 
business. 

6. To integrate skills and concepts from the common body of knowledge, bringing them to 
bear upon the critical analysis of business/finance issues and problems. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

SLOl. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the major concepts and practices of 

financial analysis and management and develop analytical decision making skills. 

SL02. Students will demonstrate knowledge of investments and derivatives for the 
practical application of theory. 

SL03. Students will demonstrate overall knowledge of finance and major functional areas 
in business for careers in finance and business, and /or graduate study. 

Graduation Requirements: This degree program requires at least 122 semester hours for 
completion. 



Freshman 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


MAT 110 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 




Natural Science Req. 


3 




Natural Science Req. 


3 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3 


COM 103 
172 


Intro to Public Speaking 


3 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



REA 101 Critical Thinking & Read or 3 

ENG lllFirst Year Literature 
PED 1 10 Dimension of Wellness 2 

17 



HIS African Amer History I or II 

REL 101 Intro to Religion 



3 

3 

IS 



Sophomore Year 
First Semester 

ACC 2 1 1 Principles of Accounting I 

ECO 201 Principles of Macro 

201 Foreign Language Req. 

CSC 101 Intro to Computers 
Social Science Req. 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



Second Semester 

ACC 212 Principles of Accounting II 

ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics 

202 Foreign Language Req. 

BUS 215 Quant Methods for Business 
BUS 211 Principles of Management 
Humanities Requirement 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 



Junior Year 
First Semester 

BUS 320 Business Statistics I 

ECO 371 Money & Capital Markets 

MAR 301 Principles of Marketing 

History/Gov Req. 

FIN 301 Principles of Finance 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Second Semester 

BUS 321 Business Statistics II 

FIN 323 Corporate Finance 

BUS 311 Business Law I 

FIN 333 Investments 



3 
3 

3 

12 



Senior Year 
First Semester 

BUS 394 Business Ethics & Society 3 

BUS 404 International Business 3 

BUS 403 Strategic Management 3 

FIN 495 Futures & Options Markets 3 

Approved Finance Elective* 3 

15 



Second Semester 

BUS 450 Business Intern. & Seminar 
BUS 420 Operations Research 
BUS 498 Senior Project in Business 
Approved Finance Elective* 



3 
3 
3 

3 

12 



Approved electives are: 

Credits 

ACC 311 Intermediate Accounting I 3 

ACC 312 Intermediate Accounting II 3 

ACC 352 Managerial Accounting 3 

ACC 434 Federal Income Tax I 3 

BUS 353 Principles of Insurance 3 

BUS 355 Principles of Real Estate 3 

FIN 350 Principles of Financial Planning 3 

FIN 493 Portfolio Analysis and Management 3 

FIN 496 Financial Statement Analysis 3 

FIN 497 International Money & Finance 3 

Business Administration Elective 3 

Business Administration Elective 3 



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Bachelor of Science in 

Marketing 

Mission of the Marketing Program 

The mission of the Marketing program is to provide students with an understanding of the 
basic structures and processes of marketing and assist them in developing the ability to analyze 
and deal with marketing problems and opportunities. The program prepares students for 
careers in marketing and provides them the opportunity to pursue graduate studies. The 
Marketing program is intended to provide the students with necessary skills for performance of 
assigned duties in the fields of: 

1. Marketing Management 

2. Marketing Research 

3. Industrial Sales 

4. Retail Management 

The goals of the program are as follows: 

1. To provide the knowledge and skills necessary for the application of marketing 
technology within an organization 

2. To aid the students in the development of marketing skills in order to facilitate the 
creation of successful marketing policies within a firm 

3. To enhance student abilities to conduct research, analyze data and report results 
through utilization of the latest marketing information and techniques 

4. To aid the student in the development of creative solutions to marketing problems 
within a business organization through the preparation of a professional report based on 
the practical application of marketing knowledge and field research 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) 

1 . Students should understand basic marketing principles and the fundamentals for successful 
retailing management, product and services marketing, electronic commerce, advertising, 
channel structure, and personal selling in order to effectively market themselves and the 
organization they represent. 

2. Students should understand the fundamentals of consumer behavior and be able to perform 
a conceptual analysis of consumer behavior individually, within a general retailing or 
industrial personal selling context. 

3. Students should demonstrate an understanding of current issues in marketing, their 
applications in marketing contexts, and fundamental techniques of marketing research. 

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Graduation Requirements: This degree program requires at least 122 semester hours for 
completion. 



Freshman 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


MAT 110 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 




Natural Science Req. 


3 




Natural Science Req. 


3 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3 


COM 103 


Intro to Public Spkg. 


3 


RE A 101 


Crit. Think. & Read or 


3 


HIS_ 


African Amer His. 


3 


ENG 111 


First Year Literature 






I or II 




PED 110 


Dim. of Wellness 


2 
17 


REL 101 


Intro to Religion 


3 

IS 



Sophomore Year 
First Semester 

ACC 211 Prin. of Accounting I 

201 Foreign Lang. Req. 

ECO 201 Principles of Macro 
CSC 101 Intro to Computers 
BUS 2 1 1 Prin. of Management 
Social Science Req. 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 



Second Semester 

ACC 212 Prin. of Accounting II 

202 Foreign Lang. Req. 

ECO 202 Principles of Micro 
BUS 215 Quant Meth. for Bus. 
Humanities Req. 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



Junior Year 
First Semester 

BUS 320 
MAR 301 
ACC 352 
FIN 301 



Business Statistics I 
Prin. of Marketing 
Managerial Acct. 
Prin. of Finance 
History /Gov Req. 



3 


BUS 321 


3 


BUS 311 


3 


BUS 394 


3 


BUS 404 


3 


ECO 371 


12 





Second Semester 

Business Statistics II 
Business Law I 
Business Ethics & Soc. 
International Business 
Money & Cap. Mark. 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Senior Year 






First Semester 




BUS 450 


Bus. Intern. & Sem. 


3 


BUS 403 


Strategic Manage. 


3 


MAR 495 


Consumer Behavior 


3 





Appr. Marketing Elec. 


*3 
12 



Second Semester 

MAR 495 Marketing Research 3 
BUS 420 Operations Research 3 
BUS 498 Sr. Project in Business 3 

Appr. Marketing Elec* 3 

15 



APPROVED MARKETING ELECTIVES ARE: 

MAR 361 Retail Marketing 

MAR 362 Personal Selling 

MAR 363 Direct Marketing Management 

MAR 460 Advertising 

MAR 461 Marketing Channels 

MAR 462 International Marketing 

MAR 463 Survey of E-Commerce 

MAR 490 Services Marketing 

MAR 487 Seminar in Marketing 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Pre-Hospitality Management Dual Program 

The objective of the Florida Memorial University /Florida International University Hospitality 
Management Program is to provide students the opportunity to obtain the Bachelor of Science 
Degree in Business Administration from Florida Memorial University and the Bachelor of 
Science Degree in Hospitality Management or the Master of Science Degree in Hotel and Food 
Service Management from Florida International University. 

Graduation Requirements 

This concentration requires a minimum of 127 semester hours for completion. 



Freshman Year 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



ENG101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 3 




MAT 110 


Intermediate Algebra or 


3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra or 


3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 


MAT 112 


Pre-Calculus 


3 


BIO 101 


Biological Science 


3 


PSC 101 


Physical Science 


3 


FMU 101 


University 101 


3 


CSC 101 


Intro to Computers 


3 


REA 101 


Crit. Think & Rdng. or 


3 


REL 201 


Intro to Religion 


3 


PEd 110 


Dim. of Wellness 


2 
17 


HIS 200 


History of USA 


3 
is 


Sophomore 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ACC211 


Prin. of Accounting I 


3 


ENG 309 


Adv. Grammar & Comp. 


3 




Foreign Language I 


3 


ACC212 


Prin. of Accounting II 


3 


SSC 


Cont. Soc. I or II. 


3 


BUS 215 


Quant. Methods for Bus. 


3 


ECO 202 


Principles of Micro 


3 


BUS 211 


Prin. of Management 


3 





Afr. Amer. Hist. I or II 


3 


202 


Foreign Language II 


3 








MUS 200 


Music Appreciation 


3 






15 






IS 


Junior Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 





BUS 320 Business Statistics I 

BUS 311 Business Law I 

MAR 301 Prin. of Marketing 

Appr. Business Elective 

BUS 240 Intro. To Hospitality 

Management 



3 BUS 312 Business Law II 3 

3 BUS 321 Business Statistics II 3 

3 Appr. Business Elective 3 

3 FIN 301 Principles of Finance 3 

3 ECO 371 Money & Capital Markets 3 

15 15 



Minor in Business Administration, Finance, Human Resource Management and Marketing 

A minor is available Business Administration, Finance, Human Resource Management and 
Marketing. A program of study in Business Administration, Finance, Human Resource 
Management and Marketing serves as a foundation for students who have interest in pursuing 
graduate work or a career in these areas. For a minor student must complete eighteen credit 
hours with a grade of "C" or better in related minor. 



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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Students should consult with the School's Dean as soon as the decision to pursue a minor in has 
been made. An agreement about specific courses to satisfy the minor requirements must be 
made during the application process. Students selecting a minor must adhere to the same 
entrance requirements as those pursuing a major in the School of Business and must have a 
strong background in mathematics. 

Minor in Business Administration 



ACC211 
BUS 210 
FIN 301 


Principles of Accounting I 
Principles of Management 
Principles of Finance 


3 
3 
3 


MAR 301 

BUS — 


Principles of Marketing 
Business Electives 


3 

3 


BUS ----- 


Business Elective 


3 



Minor in Finance 

BUS 353 Principles of Insurance 3 

FIN 301 Principles of Finance 3 

FIN 323 Corporate Finance 3 

FIN 333 Investment 3 

FIN 350 Principals of Financial Planning 3 

FIN 493 Portfolio Analysis & Management 3 

FIN 495 Futures & Options Markets 3 

FIN 496 Financial Statement Analysis 3 

FIN 497 International Money & Finance 3 

Minor in Human Resource Management 

HRM 350 Human Resource Management 3 

HRM360 Legal Environment of HRM 3 

HRM 380 Compensation Management 3 

HRM 410 Labor Relations 3 

HRM 420 Staffing and Development 3 

HRM 430 Creative Productive Relationships 3 

Minor in Marketing 

MAR 301 Principles of Marketing 3 

MAR 361 Retail Marketing 3 

MAR 362 Personal Selling 3 

MAR 395 Consumer Behavior 3 

MAR 460 Advertising 3 

MAR 461 Marketing Channels 3 

MAR 462 International Marketing 3 

MAR 463 Survey of e-Commerce 3 

MAR 487 Seminar in Marketing 3 

MAR 490 Service Marketing 3 

MAR 495 Marketing Research 3 



Approval of Advisor Required. 



177 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



School of Education 

The School of Education offers the following degrees: 

The Bachelor of Science in Biology Education 

The Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education/ESOL K-6 

The Bachelor of Science in Exceptional Education/ESOL K-12 

The Bachelor of Science in General Science Education 5-9 

The Bachelor of Science in Middle Grade English 5-9 

The Bachelor of Science in Middle Grades Mathematics Education 5-9 

The Bachelor of Science in Music Education K-12 

The Bachelor of Science in Physical Education K-12 

The Bachelor of Science in Secondary English 6-12 

The Bachelor of Science in Secondary Mathematics 6-12 

The School of Education offers degrees in these specialized fields along with the teacher 
education curriculum to prepare students for a professional teaching career in the respective 
content areas. Additionally, a minor in Health Education is available. 

The curricular offerings in the Professional Education Program provide opportunities to learn 
and practice appropriate theories, concepts and strategies. The Professional Education Program 
provides the pre-professional teacher with the knowledge, skills, and competencies necessary to 
be effective educators by emphasizing such areas as methodologies, of instruction, classroom 
management, curriculum, assessment, field activities and the internship experience. The 
curriculum developed for majors leading to teacher certification is based on the State Board of 
Education rules prescribed in Chapter 6A.-5.066, 5FAC of the Department of Education for the 
State of Florida. 

School of Education Mission Statement 

The professional education program at Florida Memorial University is designed to uphold and 
carry out the mission of the University, which is to provide effective programs that lead to life- 
long learning and leadership through service. The dynamics of change have led to the 
continuation of high expectations in the quality of educators prepared at this institution, from 
increasing the diversity of the student population to revision of the program that addresses the 
use of technology in both preparation for and in instruction. Effective educators will 
demonstrate the attributes of high expectations in terms of scholarship, service and research as 
they prepare to become professionals in their respective fields. Graduates of the teacher 
education program are noted for their professionalism and their belief that all children can 
learn. The School's vision may be captured by the following theme: Continuing the Heritage, 



178 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Legacy and Tradition of Florida Memorial University: Preparing Constructivist, Competent and 
Compassionate Educators, (C3E). 

School of Education Goals 

(1) Candidates will provide quality instruction that address instructional design and 
planning, the learning environment, instructional delivery and facilitation, and 
assessment. 

(2) Continuous Improvement, Responsibility and Ethics 

Professional Education Program 

Admission to the Professional Education Program 

The curriculum for the Professional Education Program is designed to be fulfilled in 
approximately two years after completion of the general education curriculum required by 
Florida Memorial University. 

Students are admitted into the University as pre-education majors and must maintain an overall 
2.5 GPA. Upon successful completion of all sections of the General Knowledge Test and a 
minimum overall 2.5 GPA, students are admitted into the School of Education Teacher 
Preparation Program as education majors. 

To qualify for full admittance into the School of Education, the student must satisfy the 
following requirements: 

• A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 at the completion of 60 credits. 

• A passing score on all four sub-sections of the GK (General Knowledge) 

Teacher Education Internship 

Admission to the Teacher Education Internship 

• The culmination the Professional Education Program concludes with the Education 

Internship. The internship experience provides the vehicle for the pre-professional 
teachers to demonstrate teacher competencies by connecting theoretical with the 
practical experiences through implementation of the teaching process. An Internship 
application must be completed by the announced deadline one semester prior to the 
internship experience. Internship is completed during the last semester of the senior 
year. Before applying for the internship, students must be fully accepted into the 
Professional Education Program. Students must also complete all required education 
courses prior to internship unless the course is specified to be completed concurrently 
with internship. Acceptance into the Education Internship Program is granted by the 
Professional Education Program faculty committee. Additionally, for acceptance into 
the internship program, students must satisfy the following requirements: 

179 



Flotilla Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



• An overall cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher 

• A GPA of 2.5. or higher in the major area 

• A typed one page essay entitled: My Philosophy of Education 

• Successful completion of Pre-Student Teaching experiences 

• Completion of course audit by the Coordinator /Advisor of the major area. 

• Demonstrate competency of the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices for the 

Developing/Synthesis level 

Candidates for internship will be granted permission to register for the internship after all of the 
above mentioned requirements have been satisfied. 

Graduation Requirements 

Before graduating from the School of Education's Professional Education Program, the student 
must have: 

• Completed all requirements for the Professional Education Program. 

• Passed the Professional Examination and the Subject Area examination of FTCE (Florida 
Teacher Certification Examination) 

• Completed graduation requirements 

• Completed and submitted all appropriate materials for graduation with the Advisor/Major 
Area Coordinator. (Education programs are subject to change based on the 
recommendations from the Florida Department of Education for program approval in order 
to meet the state certification requirements). 

• Paid the graduation Fee 

• Demonstrate competency of the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices at the Validating 
level. 

• Demonstrate competency of Domains/Standards for English Speaker of Other Languages 

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES 

Each Teacher Candidate Graduate will demonstrate the following: 

1. The candidates will be able to design and plan lessons for diverse K-12 learners. 

2. The candidates will be able to construct a student-centered learning environment 
conducive to all K-12 learners. 

3. The candidates will deliver and facilitate instruction using best practices. 

4. The candidates will be able to design and use assessment to guide instruction. 

5. The candidates will collaborate with stakeholders in his/her professional 
development to enhance the teaching and learning process. 

6. The candidate will be able to demonstrate conduct that reflects high moral standards 
and ethical behavior with stakeholders. 



180 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Bachelor of Science in 

Biology Education 

This degree is designed to prepare students for professional studies as well as to teach biology. 
This degree requires 136 credit hours for completion. In order to complete the degree in four 
years, students must take more than 15 credits a semester or attend at least one summer 
session. 

PROGRAM GOALS 

(1) Candidates will provide quality instruction that addresses instructional design and 
planning, the learning environment, instructional delivery and facilitation, and assessment. 

(2) Continuous Improvement, Responsibility and Ethics. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Developing 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use lesson plans to align instruction with state- 
adopted standards at the appropriate level of rigor. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans for students to achieve 
mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use (lesson plans, management plans) to 
illustrate respect of students' cultural, linguistic and family background. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/communication resource 
lists to integrate current information and communication technologies. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will adapt the learning environment (through lesson 
plans or management plans) to accommodate the differing needs and diversity of students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will modify lesson plans/lesson delivery to respond 
to preconceptions or misconceptions. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will relate and integrate the subject matter with 
other disciplines and life experience to deliver engaging and challenging lessons. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will differentiate instructional plans based on an 
assessment of student learning needs and recognition of individual differences in students. 

181 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/assessment reports to 
modify assessments and testing conditions to accommodate learning styles and varying levels 
of knowledge. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design assessment reports to apply technology 
to organize and integrate assessment information. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will engage in a targeted professional development 

plan and reflective practices. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will implement knowledge and skills learned in 

professional development in the teaching and learning process through lesson plans/narrative 

reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will identify ethical and moral behavior which 
adheres to the Code of Conduct illustrated in a classroom vignette/case study through their 
written reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will analyze the relationship between the NEA and 
State of Florida Code of Ethics through written reflection. 

Synthesis 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will sequence lessons and concepts to ensure 
coherence and required prior knowledge in lesson plans. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will select appropriate formative assessments to 
monitor learning in lesson plans/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will convey high expectations to all students in lesson 
plans/observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will model clear, acceptable oral and written 
communication skills in lesson plans and lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will utilize current and emerging assistive 
technologies that enable students to participate in high-quality communication interactions and 
achieve their educational goals in (lesson plans and lesson observations). 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will deepen and enrich students' understanding 
through content area literacy strategies, verbalization of thought, and application of the subject 
matter in lesson plans/observation. 



182 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will identify gaps in students' subject matter 
knowledge in lesson plans and/or assessment plan and/or narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will employ higher-order questioning techniques in 
lesson plans and/or lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will complete an assessment report/lesson plans to 
design and align formative and summative assessments that match learning objectives and lead 
to mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will vise a variety of assessment tools to monitor 
student progress, achievement and learning gains in an assessment report/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will design purposeful professional goals to strengthen 
the effectiveness of instruction based on students' needs. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will engage in professional dialogue, which 
demonstrates respect for individual differences and fairness with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 

Validating 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/narrative reflection, which 
uses a variety of data to evaluate learning outcomes, adjust planning and improve lesson 
effectiveness. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will provide learning experience through lesson plans 
that require students to demonstrate a variety of applicable skills and competencies. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will organize, allocate, and manage the resources of 
time, space, and attention within lesson delivery (lesson plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will manage individual and class behaviors through a 
well-planned management system (management plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will maintain a climate of openness, inquiry, fairness, 
and support (observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will apply varied instructional strategies and 
resources, including technology, to provide comprehensible instruction, and to teach for 
student understanding through lesson plans and observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will support, encourage, and provide immediate and 
specific feedback to students to promote student achievement through lesson observations. 

183 



Flotilla Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Teacher candidates at the validating level will utilize student feedback to monitor instructional 
needs and to adjust instruction through reflective analysis. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/assessment report, which 
analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to diagnose students' 
learning needs, informs instruction based on those needs, and drives the learning process. 
Teacher candidates at the validating level will construct written reports to share the importance 
and outcomes of student assessment data with the student and the student's 
parent/caregiver(s). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will examine and use data-informed research to 
improve instruction and student achievement through case study/intervention plan 
implementation. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will collaborate with the home, school and larger 
communities to foster communication and to support student learning and continuous 
improvement through narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will demonstrate professional dispositions through 
adherence to professional, legal, and ethical responsibility with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 



Freshman Year 
First Semester 

FMU lOlUniversity 101 * 
ENG 101 College Writing I 
MAT 111 College Algebra 
REA 101 CritThk&Rdor 
ENG 111 First Year Lit 
BIO 130 Prin of Biology 
BIO 131 Prin of Biology Lab 

Sophomore Year 
First Semester 

MAT 305 Clg. Geometry 
BIO 206 General Botany 
BIO 207 General Bot Lab 
CHE 110 General Chem 
CHE 111 Gen Chem Lab 
PSY 200 Intro to Psychology 
REL 201 Intro to Phil. 



Junior Year 
First Semester 

PHY 200 College Physics I 
PHY 201 College Physics Lab 
BIO 200 Human Anat & Phy 



Second Semester 



3 


ENG 102 College Writing II 


3 


3 


MAT 112 Pre-Calculus 


3 


3 


BIO 204 General Zoology 


3 


3 


BIO 205 General Zoo Lab 


1 




HIS 103 Af. Am. History 


3 


3 


ENV 131 Earth Science 


3 


I 


COM 103 Intro to Pub Spkg 


3 


16 


Second Semester 


19 


3 


EDU 203 Psy/Soc Foun Ed. 


3 


3 


CHE 112 Gen Chemistry 


4 


1 


CHE 113 Gen Chem Lab 


1 


4 


BIO 310 Genetics 


3 


1 


BIO 311 Genetics Lab 


1 


3 


PED 110 Dim of Well 


2 


3 


EDU 206 Tchg in M/S Sch 


3 


18 


Second Semester 


17 



3 PHY 202 Clg Physics II 3 

1 PHY204 ClgPhysiLab 1 

3 BIO 320 Ecology 3 



Li 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



BIO 201 Human Anat &Phy Labi BIO 321 Ecolog Lab 1 

EDU 205 Multi. Diversity 3 HIS 200 History of USA 3 

EDU 331 Instructional Tech. 3 EDU 314 Pre-Student Tchg 1 

EDU 313 Pre-Student Teaching 1 EDU 308 Teach Read in E/Sch 3 

ESO 402 Methods of Tchg ESOL 3_ EDU 426 Content Read 3 

18 18 

Senior Year 



9 
3 

12 



First Semester 




Second Semester 


BIO 410 Microbiology 


3 


EDU 450 Internship 


BIO 411 Microbiology Lab 


L 


Fine Arts Req 


EDU 408 Clsrm Beh Mgmt 


3 




EDU 439 Tst and Msmt 


3 




EDU 315 Pre-Student Teaching 


1 




BIO 420 Cell Biology 


3 




BIO 421 Cell Biology Lab 


1 




EDU 419 Tchg Sci in M/S 


3 

18 





Bachelor of Science in 

Elementary Education /ESOL(K-6) 

The major in Elementary Education/ESOL provides students with content, education theory, 
methods of teaching and management principles and practices needed to address diverse 
learners. Students who complete this major are prepared to be professional elementary teachers 
and for further study at the graduate level. This degree program requires 126 credit hours for 
completion with ESOL endorsement. In order to complete the degree in four years, students 
must take more than 15 credits a semester or attend at least one summer session. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Developing 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use lesson plans to align instruction with state- 
adopted standards at the appropriate level of rigor. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans for students to achieve 
mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use (lesson plans, management plans) to 
illustrate respect of students' cultural, linguistic and family background. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/communication resource 
lists to integrate current information and communication technologies. 



185 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Teacher candidates at the developing level will adapt the learning environment (through lesson 
plans or management plans) to accommodate the differing needs and diversity of students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will modify lesson plans/lesson delivery to respond 
to preconceptions or misconceptions. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will relate and integrate the subject matter with other 
disciplines and life experience to deliver engaging and challenging lessons. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will differentiate instructional plans based on an 
assessment of student learning needs and recognition of individual differences in students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/assessment reports to 
modify assessments and testing conditions to accommodate learning styles and varying levels 
of knowledge. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design assessment reports to apply technology 
to organize and integrate assessment information. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will engage in a targeted professional development 
plan and reflective practices. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will implement knowledge and skills learned in 
professional development in the teaching and learning process through lesson plans/narrative 
reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will identify ethical and moral behavior which 
adheres to the Code of Conduct illustrated in a classroom vignette/case study through their 
written reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will analyze the relationship between the NEA and 
State of Florida Code of Ethics through written reflection. 

Synthesis 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will sequence lessons and concepts to ensure 
coherence and required prior knowledge in lesson plans. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will select appropriate formative assessments to 
monitor learning in lesson plans/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will convey high expectations to all students in lesson 
plans/observations. 

186 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will model clear, acceptable oral and written 
communication skills in lesson plans and lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will utilize current and emerging assistive technologies 
that enable students to participate in high-quality communication interactions and achieve their 
educational goals in (lesson plans and lesson observations). 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will deepen and enrich students' understanding 
through content area literacy strategies, verbalization of thought, and application of the subject 
matter in lesson plans/observation. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will identify gaps in students' subject matter 
knowledge in lesson plans and/or assessment plan and/or narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will employ higher-order questioning techniques in 
lesson plans and/or lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will complete an assessment report/lesson plans to 
design and align formative and summative assessments that match learning objectives and lead 
to mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will use a variety of assessment tools to monitor 
student progress, achievement and learning gains in an assessment report/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will design purposeful professional goals to strengthen 
the effectiveness of instruction based on students' needs. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will engage in professional dialogue, which 
demonstrates respect for individual differences and fairness with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 

Validating 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/narrative reflection, which 
uses a variety of data to evaluate learning outcomes, adjust planning and improve lesson 
effectiveness. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will provide learning experience through lesson plans 
that require students to demonstrate a variety of applicable skills and competencies. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will organize, allocate, and manage the resources of 
time, space, and attention within lesson delivery (lesson plan/observation). 



187 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Teacher candidates at the validating level will manage individual and class behaviors through a 
well-planned management system (management plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will maintain a climate of openness, inquiry, fairness, 
and support (observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will apply varied instructional strategies and 
resources, including technology, to provide comprehensible instruction, and to teach for student 
understanding through lesson plans and observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will support, encourage, and provide immediate and 
specific feedback to students to promote student achievement through lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will utilize student feedback to monitor instructional 
needs and to adjust instruction through reflective analysis. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/assessment report, which 
analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to diagnose students' 
learning needs, informs instruction based on those needs, and drives the learning process. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will construct written reports to share the importance 
and outcomes of student assessment data with the student and the student's parent/caregiver(s). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will examine and use data-informed research to 
improve instruction and student achievement through case study/intervention plan 
implementation. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will collaborate with the home, school and larger 
communities to foster communication and to support student learning and continuous 
improvement through narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will demonstrate professional dispositions through 
adherence to professional, legal, and ethical responsibility with all stakeholdeis through 
observation/narrative reflection. 



Freshman Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


ENV 131 Earth Science 


3 


BIO 101 


Biological Science 


3 


MAT 110 Intermediate Alg. 


3 


BIO 131 


Biological Sci. Lab 


1 


FMU 101 University 101* 


3 


REA 101 


Crit Think/ Rdg or 


3 


COM 103 Intro to Pub Speak 


3 


ENG 111 


First Yr. Lit. 








HIS 103 


Afr. Amer. His 


3 






MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 




15 






L6 



Sophomore Year 
First Semester 

Literature Req** 3 

Fine Arts Req*** 3 

PSY 200 Intro. Psychology 3 



Second Semester 

HIS 200 History of USA 3 

REL 201 Into to Philo 3 

EDU 203 Psy/Soc Found/EDU 3 

188 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



PSC 101 Physical Science 
MAT 114 Finite Math 
PED 110 Dim of Wellness 



3 
3 
2 

17 



Junior Year 
First Semester 

EDU 303 Tchg Music in E/S 3 

EDU 304 Tchg Soc. Stud E/S 3 

EDU 305 Tchg. Art in E/S 3 

EDU 308 Tchg Readingin /E/S 3 

EDU 426 Content Reading 3 

EDU 313 Pre-Stud Tchg 1 

16 

Senior Year 
First Semester 

EDU 307 Tchg Math in E/S 3 

EDU 408 Clsrm Beh Mgnt 3 

EDU 429 Tchg Rem. Reading 3 

EDU 439 Tests. And Msmts 3 

ESO 402 Mthds of Tchg ESOL 3 

ESE 448 Inclu, Coll, Div 3 

EDU 315 Pre-Stud. Tchg 1 

I') 



EDU 204 Tchg in Ele School 
EDU 205 Multicultural Div 
EDU 331 Instructional Tech 



3 
3 
3 

IS 



Second Semester 

EDU 302 Tchg Science in E/S 3 
EDU 324 TchgHlth/PE 3 

ENG 460 Applied Linguistics 3 
EDU 411 Diagnosis and Rem 3 
EDU 427 Tchg Lang Art/Child 3 
EDU 314 Pre-Stud Tchg 1 

16 



Second Semester 

EDU 450 Internship 9-12 

EDU 432 Supervi Read Pra 3 



12/15 



Bachelor of Science in 

Exceptional Student Education/ESOL K-12 



The major in Exceptional Education is designed to provide students with strong content 
knowledge, educational theory, methods of teaching and management principles and practices 
needed to address diverse learners. Students who complete this major are prepared for further 
study at the graduate or professional school level. This degree program requires at least 129 
credit hours for completion. In order to complete the degree in four years students must take 
more than 15 credits a semester or attend at least one summer session. 
Student Learning Outcomes 

Developing 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use lesson plans to align instruction with state- 
adopted standards at the appropriate level of rigor. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans for students to achieve 
mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use (lesson plans, management plans) to 
illustrate respect of students' cultural, linguistic and family background. 



189 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/communication resource 
lists to integrate current information and communication technologies. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will adapt the learning environment (through lesson 
plans or management plans) to accommodate the differing needs and diversity of students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will modify lesson plans/lesson delivery to respond 
to preconceptions or misconceptions. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will relate and integrate the subject matter with 
other disciplines and life experience to deliver engaging and challenging lessons. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will differentiate instructional plans based on an 
assessment of student learning needs and recognition of individual differences in students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/assessment reports to 
modify assessments and testing conditions to accommodate learning styles and varying levels 
of knowledge. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design assessment reports to apply technology 
to organize and integrate assessment information. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will engage in a targeted professional development 
plan and reflective practices. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will implement knowledge and skills learned in 
professional development in the teaching and learning process through lesson plans/narrative 
reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will identify ethical and moral behavior which 
adheres to the Code of Conduct illustrated in a classroom vignette/case study through their 
written reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will analyze the relationship between the NEA and 
State of Florida Code of Ethics through written reflection. 

Synthesis 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will sequence lessons and concepts to ensure 
coherence and required prior knowledge in lesson plans. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will select appropriate formative assessments to 
monitor learning in lesson plans/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will convey high expectations to all students in lesson 
plans/observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will model clear, acceptable oral and written 
communication skills in lesson plans and lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will utilize current and emerging assistive 
technologies that enable students to participate in high-quality communication interactions and 
achieve their educational goals in (lesson plans and lesson observations). 

190 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will deepen and enrich students' understanding 
through content area literacy strategies, verbalization of thought, and application of the subject 
matter in lesson plans/observation. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will identify gaps in students' subject matter 
knowledge in lesson plans and/or assessment plan and/or narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will employ higher-order questioning techniques in 
lesson plans and/or lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will complete an assessment report/lesson plans to 
design and align formative and summative assessments that match learning objectives and lead 
to mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will use a variety of assessment tools to monitor 
student progress, achievement and learning gains in an assessment report/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will design purposeful professional goals to strengthen 
the effectiveness of instruction based on students' needs. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will engage in professional dialogue, which 
demonstrates respect for individual differences and fairness with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 

Validating 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/narrative reflection, which 
uses a variety of data to evaluate learning outcomes, adjust planning and improve lesson 
effectiveness. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will provide learning experience through lesson plans 
that require students to demonstrate a variety of applicable skills and competencies. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will organize, allocate, and manage the resources of 
time, space, and attention within lesson delivery (lesson plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will manage individual and class behaviors through a 
well-planned management system (management plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will maintain a climate of openness, inquiry, fairness, 
and support (observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will apply varied instructional strategies and 
resources, including technology, to provide comprehensible instruction, and to teach for 
student understanding through lesson plans and observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will support, encourage, and provide immediate and 
specific feedback to students to promote student achievement through lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will utilize student feedback to monitor instructional 
needs and to adjust instruction through reflective analysis. 



191 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/assessment report, which 
analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to diagnose students' 
learning needs, informs instruction based on those needs, and drives the learning process. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will construct written reports to share the importance 
and outcomes of student assessment data with the student and the student's 
parent/caregiver(s). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will examine and use data-informed research to 
improve instruction and student achievement through case study/intervention plan 
implementation. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will collaborate with the home, school and larger 
communities to foster communication and to support student learning and continuous 
improvement through narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will demonstrate professional dispositions through 
adherence to professional, legal, and ethical responsibility with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 



Freshman Year 
First Semester 

FMU101 University 101 
ENG 101 College Writing I 
MAT 110 Intermediate Alg 
COM 103 Intro to Pub Spkg 
EN V 131 Earth Science 
PED 1 10 Dim. Of Wellness 





Second Semester 




3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 


3 


BIO 101 


Biological Science 


3 


3 


BIO 131 


Bio. Science Lab 


1 


3 


HIS 103 


Afr. Amer. History 


3 


2 


RE A 101 


Crit Think & Rdg 


3 




or ENG 


111 First Yr. Lit 





17 



L6 



Sophomore Year 
First Semester 



HIS 200 
PSY 200 
PSC 101 


Fine Arts Req. 
History of USA 
Intro. Psychology 
Physical Science 


3 
3 
3 
3 


MAT 114 


Finite Math 


3 


REL 201 


Intro to Philosophy 


3 
18 


Junior Year 




First Semester 





EDU 302 Tchg Science in. 3 

Ele. Sch 
EDU 304 Tchg in Soc. Stu. 3 

ESE 434 Char of Student ESE 3 
EDU 308 Tchg Rdg in E/S 3 

EDU 313 Pre-Student Teachingl 
EDU 307 Tchg Math in the . 3 

Ele Sch 

16 



Second Semester 

EDU 203 Psy/Soc Found of Edu. 

EDU 204 Tchg. In Ele School 

EDU 205 Multi. Diversity 

EDU 206 Tchg in Mid/Sec School 

ESE 430 Intro to Excp. Child 

Literature Req. 



Second Semester 

EDU 426 Content Reading 
ESE 435 Curr/Instr ESE 
ESE 447 Assess in Special 
EDU 315 Pre-Student Teaching 
ENG 460 Applied Linguistics 
ESO 402 Methods of Teaching 
of ESOL 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
is 



16 



192 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Senior Year 



First Semester 




Second Semester 




EDU 331 


Instructional Techn. 


3 


EDU 450 Internship 


9 


ESE 436 


Cur/ Instr ESE 


3 


ESE 448 Incl. Coll Div 


3 


ESE 408 


Behav Mgmt ESE 


3 


EDU 432 Prac. In Reading 


3 


EDU 411 


Diagnosis and Rem 
And Children Lit. 


3 






EDU 429 


Tchg Rem. Reading 


3 






EDU 315 


Pre-Student Tchg 


1 




1! 



Education majors who have completed two years of a foreign language in high school with GPA of 2.0 or 
higher are exempted from the University's foreign language requirement. 

Bachelor of Science in 

Middle Grades English/ESOL (5-9) 

The major in Middle Grades English/ESOL 5-9 provides students with strong content 
knowledge, educational theory and practice, methods of teaching and management principles 
and practices needed to address diverse learners. Students who complete this major are 
prepared to teach students from diverse backgrounds and for further study at the graduate or 
professional level. In order to complete the degree in four years, students must take more 
than 15 credits a semester or attend at least one summer session. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Developing 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use lesson plans to align instruction with state- 
adopted standards at the appropriate level of rigor. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans for students to achieve 
mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use (lesson plans, management plans) to 
illustrate respect of students' cultural, linguistic and family background. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/communication resource 
lists to integrate current information and communication technologies. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will adapt the learning environment (through lesson 
plans or management plans) to accommodate the differing needs and diversity of students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will modify lesson plans/lesson delivery to respond 
to preconceptions or misconceptions. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will relate and integrate the subject matter with 
other disciplines and life experience to deliver engaging and challenging lessons. 



193 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Teacher candidates at the developing level will differentiate instructional plans based on an 
assessment of student learning needs and recognition of individual differences in students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/assessment reports to 
modify assessments and testing conditions to accommodate learning styles and varying levels 
of knowledge. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design assessment reports to apply technology 
to organize and integrate assessment information. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will engage in a targeted professional development 
plan and reflective practices. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will implement knowledge and skills learned in 
professional development in the teaching and learning process through lesson plans/narrative 
reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will identify ethical and moral behavior which 
adheres to the Code of Conduct illustrated in a classroom vignette/case study through their 
written reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will analyze the relationship between the NEA and 
State of Florida Code of Ethics through written reflection. 

Synthesis 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will sequence lessons and concepts to ensure 
coherence and required prior knowledge in lesson plans. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will select appropriate formative assessments to 
monitor learning in lesson plans/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will convey high expectations to all students in lesson 
plans/observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will model clear, acceptable oral and written 
communication skills in lesson plans and lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will utilize current and emerging assistive 
technologies that enable students to participate in high-quality communication interactions and 
achieve their educational goals in (lesson plans and lesson observations). 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will deepen and enrich students' understanding 
through content area literacy strategies, verbalization of thought, and application of the subject 
matter in lesson plans/observation. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will identify gaps in students' subject matter 
knowledge in lesson plans and/or assessment plan and/or narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will employ higher-order questioning techniques in 
lesson plans and/or lesson observations. 



194 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will complete an assessment report/lesson plans to 
design and align formative and summative assessments that match learning objectives and lead 
to mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will use a variety of assessment tools to monitor 
student progress, achievement and learning gains in an assessment report/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will design purposeful professional goals to strengthen 
the effectiveness of instruction based on students' needs. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will engage in professional dialogue, which 
demonstrates respect for individual differences and fairness with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 

Validating 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/narrative reflection, which 
uses a variety of data to evaluate learning outcomes, adjust planning and improve lesson 
effectiveness. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will provide learning experience through lesson plans 
that require students to demonstrate a variety of applicable skills and competencies. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will organize, allocate, and manage the resources of 
time, space, and attention within lesson delivery (lesson plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will manage individual and class behaviors through a 
well-planned management system (management plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will maintain a climate of openness, inquiry, fairness, 
and support (observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will apply varied instructional strategies and 
resources, including technology, to provide comprehensible instruction, and to teach for 
student understanding through lesson plans and observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will support, encourage, and provide immediate and 
specific feedback to students to promote student achievement through lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will utilize student feedback to monitor instructional 
needs and to adjust instruction through reflective analysis. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/assessment report, which 
analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to diagnose students' 
learning needs, informs instruction based on those needs, and drives the learning process. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will construct written reports to share the importance 
and outcomes of student assessment data with the student and the student's 
parent/caregiver(s). 



195 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Teacher candidates at the validating level will examine and use data-informed research to 
improve instruction and student achievement through case study/intervention plan 
implementation. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will collaborate with the home, school and larger 
communities to foster communication and to support student learning and continuous 
improvement through narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will demonstrate professional dispositions through 
adherence to professional, legal, and ethical responsibility with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection . 

Graduation Requirements: This degree program requires at least 129 semester hours for 
completion. 



Freshman Year 
First Semester 

ENG 101 Clg. Writing I 

MAT 110 Intermediate Algebra 3 

COM 103 Intro to Pub Spkg 

ENV 131 Earth Science 

FMU 101 Ed. & Life Seminar 





Second Semester 




3 


ENG 102 


Clg. Writing II 


3 


3 


MAT 114 


Finite Mathematics 


3 


3 


BIO 101 


Biological Science 


3 


3 


BIO 131 


Bio. Sci. Lab 


i 


3. 


HIS 103 


Afr. Amer History 


3 




REA 101 


Crit. Thnk & Rdg or 


3 




ENG 111 


First Yr. Lit 





IS 



Id 



Sophomore Year 
First Semester 



EDU 308 
REL 201 
PSY 200 
PSC 101 
MAT 111 
PED 110 



Afr. Amer Liter 
Intro to Philosophy 
Intro to Psych 
Physical Science 
College Algebra 
Dim. Of Wellness 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
17 



Second Semester 

EDU 203 Psy/Soc Foun of Ed 

HIS 200 History of the USA 

ENG 212 Ethnic Literature 

EDU 206 Tchg in M/S 

EDU 205 Multicultural Div. 

DRA 200 Drama Appreciation 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



Junior Year 
First Semester 

ENG 303 British Literature 
ENG 316 Afr. Am Worn Wri 
ENG 309 Adv. Gram & Comp 
EDU 331 Instructional Tech 
EDU 427 Teh Lang Arts/Lit 
EDU 313 Pre-Student Tchg 
EDU 308 Tchg Rdg in E/S 

Senior Year 
First Semester 

EDU 426 Content Reading 
EDU 429 Tchg Rem Rdg 
ENG 460 Applied Ling. 



Second Semester 



3 


EDU 411 Diag&Rem 


3 


3 


ENG 315 Adol. Lit 


3 


3 


ESO 403 Mthds of Tchg ESOL 


3 


3 


EDU 439 Tsts and Msmts 


3 


3 


ENG 444 Mythology 


3 


1 

3 
16 


EDU 314 Pre-Stud Teaching 


1 




I 




Second Semester 





3 EDU 450 Internship 

3 EDU 432 Practicum in Rdg 

3 



196 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 

EDU 418 Mtd of Teh Eng M/S 3 
EDU 315 Pre-Student Tchg 1 

EDU 408 Clsm. Beh. Mgmt 3 

ENG 405 Creative Writing 3 

19 12 

Bachelor of Science in 

Middle Grades Mathematics Education (5-9) 

The major in Middle Grades Mathematics Education is designed to provide mathematics 
education majors with education theory, content knowledge, pedagogical skills, and 
management principles and practices. Students who complete this major are prepared for 
further study at the graduate level, for professional school or teaching at the middle grade level. 
This degree program requires at least 131 credits hours for completion. In order to complete 
the degree in four years, students must take more than 15 credits a semester or attend at least 
one summer session. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Developing 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use lesson plans to align instruction with state- 
adopted standards at the appropriate level of rigor. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans for students to achieve 
mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use (lesson plans, management plans) to 
illustrate respect of students' cultural, linguistic and family background. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/communication resource 
lists to integrate current information and communication technologies. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will adapt the learning environment (through lesson 
plans or management plans) to accommodate the differing needs and diversity of students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will modify lesson plans/lesson delivery to respond 
to preconceptions or misconceptions. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will relate and integrate the subject matter with 
other disciplines and life experience to deliver engaging and challenging lessons. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will differentiate instructional plans based on an 
assessment of student learning needs and recognition of individual differences in students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/assessment reports to 
modify assessments and testing conditions to accommodate learning styles and varying levels 
of knowledge. 

197 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Teacher candidates at the developing level will design assessment reports to apply technology 
to organize and integrate assessment information. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will engage in a targeted professional development 
plan and reflective practices. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will implement knowledge and skills learned in 
professional development in the teaching and learning process through lesson plans/narrative 
reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will identify ethical and moral behavior which 
adheres to the Code of Conduct illustrated in a classroom vignette/case study through their 
written reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will analyze the relationship between the NEA and 
State of Florida Code of Ethics through written reflection. 

Synthesis 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will sequence lessons and concepts to ensure 
coherence and required prior knowledge in lesson plans. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will select appropriate formative assessments to 
monitor learning in lesson plans/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will convey high expectations to all students in lesson 
plans/observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will model clear, acceptable oral and written 
communication skills in lesson plans and lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will utilize current and emerging assistive 
technologies that enable students to participate in high-quality communication interactions and 
achieve their educational goals in (lesson plans and lesson observations). 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will deepen and enrich students' understanding 
through content area literacy strategies, verbalization of thought, and application of the subject 
matter in lesson plans/observation. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will identify gaps in students' subject matter 
knowledge in lesson plans and/or assessment plan and/or narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will employ higher-order questioning techniques in 
lesson plans and/or lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will complete an assessment report/lesson plans to 
design and align formative and summative assessments that match learning objectives and lead 
to mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will use a variety of assessment tools to monitor 
student progress, achievement and learning gains in an assessment report/case study. 



198 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will design purposeful professional goals to strengthen 
the effectiveness of instruction based on students' needs. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will engage in professional dialogue, which 
demonstrates respect for individual differences and fairness with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 

Validating 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/narrative reflection, which 
uses a variety of data to evaluate learning outcomes, adjust planning and improve lesson 
effectiveness. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will provide learning experience through lesson plans 
that require students to demonstrate a variety of applicable skills and competencies. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will organize, allocate, and manage the resources of 
time, space, and attention within lesson delivery (lesson plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will manage individual and class behaviors through a 
well-planned management system (management plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will maintain a climate of openness, inquiry, fairness, 
and support (observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will apply varied instructional strategies and 
resources, including technology, to provide comprehensible instruction, and to teach for 
student understanding through lesson plans and observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will support, encourage, and provide immediate and 
specific feedback to students to promote student achievement through lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will utilize student feedback to monitor instructional 
needs and to adjust instruction through reflective analysis. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/assessment report, which 
analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to diagnose students' 
learning needs, informs instruction based on those needs, and drives the learning process. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will construct written reports to share the importance 
and outcomes of student assessment data with the student and the student's 
parent/caregiver(s). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will examine and use data-informed research to 
improve instruction and student achievement through case study/intervention plan 
implementation. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will collaborate with the home, school and larger 
communities to foster communication and to support student learning and continuous 
improvement through narrative reflection. 



199 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Teacher candidates at the validating level will demonstrate professional dispositions through 
adherence to professional, legal, and ethical responsibility with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 



Freshman 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




FMU 101 


University 101* 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


MAT 112 


Pre-Calculus 


3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 


MAT 113 


Clg. Trigonometry 


3 


BIO 130 


Prin of Biology 


3 


PHY 110 


Gen. Physics 


3 


BIO 131 


Prin of Bio Lab I 


I 


PHY 111 


Gen. Physics Lab 


I 


RE A 101 


Crit Think and Rdg 


3 


HIS 103 


Afr. Amer. History 


3 


ENG 111 


First Yr. Lit 











16 



lb 



Sophomore Year 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



COM 103 


Intro to Pub Spkg 


3 


REL 201 


Intro to Philosophy 


3 




ENV 131 


Earth Science 


3 


MAT 202 


Calculus II 


3 




MAT 201 


Calculus 


3 


MAT 210 


Discrete Math 


3 




MAT 205 


Prob & Stats 


3 


HIS 200 


History of USA 


3 




PSY 200 


Intro to Psychology 


3 


EDU 203 


Psy/Soc Found Edu. 


3 







Fine Arts Req 


3 
18 


PED110 


Dim. of Wellness 


2 
17 




Junior Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 






MAT 305 


Clg. Geometry 


3 




Social Science Req.*** 




3 




Program Language 


3 


EDU 426 


Content Reading 




3 


MAT 307 


Number Theory 


3 




App Math Elective 




3 


EDU 205 


Multicultural Div 


3 


MAT 303 


Hist of Math 




3 


EDU 206 


Tchg in M/S Sch 


3 


EDU 331 


Instructional Tech 




3 


EDU 313 


Pre-Student Tchg 


1 


EDU 314 


Pre-Student Tchg 




1 


EDU 308 


Tchg, Reading in Ele 


3 
L9 


ESO 402 


Mthds of Tchg ESOL 




3 
19 


Senior Year 












First Semester 




Second Semester 








Approve Math Elec 


3 


EDU 450 


Internship 




9 





Approve Math Elec 


3 





Literature Requirement 




3 


EDU 439 


Tst and Msmts 


3 










EDU 408 


Clsrm Beh. Mgmt 


3 










EDU 422 


Tchg Math M Sch 


3 










EDU 315 


Pre-Student Techg 


1 
16 








12 



200 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Bachelor of Science in 

Middle Grades Science (5-9) 

The major in Middle Grades General Science 5-9 provides students with strong content 
knowledge, educational theory and practice, methods of teaching, and management principles 
and practices. Students who complete this major are prepared to teach students from diverse 
backgrounds and for further study at the graduate or professional school level. This degree 
program requires 127credit hours for completion. In order to complete the degree in four 
years, student must take more than 15 credits a semester or attend at least one summer 
session. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Developing 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use lesson plans to align instruction with state- 
adopted standards at the appropriate level of rigor. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans for students to achieve 
mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use (lesson plans, management plans) to 
illustrate respect of students' cultural, linguistic and family background. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/communication resource 
lists to integrate current information and communication technologies. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will adapt the learning environment (through lesson 
plans or management plans) to accommodate the differing needs and diversity of students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will modify lesson plans/lesson delivery to respond 
to preconceptions or misconceptions. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will relate and integrate the subject matter with 
other disciplines and life experience to deliver engaging and challenging lessons. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will differentiate instructional plans based on an 
assessment of student learning needs and recognition of individual differences in students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/assessment reports to 
modify assessments and testing conditions to accommodate learning styles and varying levels 
of knowledge. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design assessment reports to apply technology 
to organize and integrate assessment information. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will engage in a targeted professional development 
plan and reflective practices. 

201 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalo g 



Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will implement knowledge and skills learned in 
professional development in the teaching and learning process through lesson plans/narrative 
reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will identify ethical and moral behavior which 
adheres to the Code of Conduct illustrated in a classroom vignette/case study through their 
written reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will analyze the relationship between the NEA and 
State of Florida Code of Ethics through written reflection. 

Synthesis 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will sequence lessons and concepts to ensure 
coherence and required prior knowledge in lesson plans. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will select appropriate formative assessments to 
monitor learning in lesson plans/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will convey high expectations to all students in lesson 
plans/observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will model clear, acceptable oral and written 
communication skills in lesson plans and lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will utilize current and emerging assistive 
technologies that enable students to participate in high-quality communication interactions and 
achieve their educational goals in (lesson plans and lesson observations). 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will deepen and enrich students' understanding 
through content area literacy strategies, verbalization of thought, and application of the subject 
matter in lesson plans/observation. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will identify gaps in students' subject matter 
knowledge in lesson plans and/or assessment plan and/or narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will employ higher-order questioning techniques in 
lesson plans and/or lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will complete an assessment report/lesson plans to 
design and align formative and summative assessments that match learning objectives and lead 
to mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will use a variety of assessment tools to monitor 
student progress, achievement and learning gains in an assessment report/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will design purposeful professional goals to strengthen 
the effectiveness of instruction based on students' needs. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will engage in professional dialogue, which 
demonstrates respect for individual differences and fairness with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 

202 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 

Validating 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/narrative reflection, which 
uses a variety of data to evaluate learning outcomes, adjust planning and improve lesson 
effectiveness. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will provide learning experience through lesson plans 
that require students to demonstrate a variety of applicable skills and competencies. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will organize, allocate, and manage the resources of 
time, space, and attention within lesson delivery (lesson plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will manage individual and class behaviors through a 
well-planned management system (management plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will maintain a climate of openness, inquiry, fairness, 
and support (observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will apply varied instructional strategies and 
resources, including technology, to provide comprehensible instruction, and to teach for 
student understanding through lesson plans and observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will support, encourage, and provide immediate and 
specific feedback to students to promote student achievement through lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will utilize student feedback to monitor instructional 
needs and to adjust instruction through reflective analysis. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/assessment report, which 
analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to diagnose students' 
learning needs, informs instruction based on those needs, and drives the learning process. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will construct written reports to share the importance 
and outcomes of student assessment data with the student and the student's 
parent/caregiver(s). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will examine and use data-informed research to 
improve instruction and student achievement through case study/intervention plan 
implementation. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will collaborate with the home, school and larger 
communities to foster communication and to support student learning and continuous 
improvement through narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will demonstrate professional dispositions through 
adherence to professional, legal, and ethical responsibility with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 

Freshman Year 

Mist Semester Second Semester 

FMU101 University 101 * 3 ENG 102 Clg Writing II 3 

ENG 101 Clg. Writing I 3 MAT 112 Pre-Calculus 3 

203 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



MAT 111 


Clg. Algebra 


3 


BIO 130 Prin of Biology 


3 




COM 103 


Intro to Pub Spkg 


3 


BIO 131 Prin of Bio Lab 


I 




ENV131 


Earth Science 


3 

15 


HIS 103 Afr. Amer History 
REA 101 Crit Think & Rdg or 
ENG111 First Yr. Lit 


3 
J 

16 




Sophomore Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 








Lit. Req. 


3 


PED 1 10 Dim of Wellness 


2 




CHE 110 


General Chemistry 


■1 


HIS 200 History of USA 


3 




CHE 111 


Gen Chemistry Lab 


I 


EDU 203 Psy/Soc Found of Ed 


3 




PSY 200 


Intro to Psychology 


3 


EDU 205 Multicultural Div 


3 




PSC 101 


Physical Science 


3 


EDU 206 Tchg in Mid/Sec Sch 


3 




MAT 305 


General Geometry 


3 
17 


REL 201 Intro to Phil 


3 
17 




Junior Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 








Major Science Req 


3 


EDU 314 Pre-Student Tchg. 




1 


EDU 313 


Pre-Student Tchg 


1 


BIO 320 Ecology 




3 


BIO 204 


Gen Zoology 


3 


BIO 321 Ecology Lab 




1 


BIO 205 


Gen Zoology Lab 


I 


BIO 206 Gen Botany 




3 


PHY 201 


Clg Physics 


3 


BIO 207 Gen Botany Lab 




I 


PHY 202 


Clg Physics Lab 


1 


EDU 331 Instructional Tech 




3 




Social Science Req. 


3 


EDU 426 Content Reading . 
EDU 308 Teaching Rdg. In Ele, 


3 




3 






15 






18 



Senior Year 








First Semester 


Second Semester 




EDU 408 Clsrm Beh Mgmt 


3 


EDU 450 Internship 


9 


EDU 419 Tchg Science in M/S 


3 


Fine Arts Requirement 


3 


EDU 439 Test & Msmts 


3 




12 


EDU 315 Pre-Student Tchg 


1 






BIO 310 Genetics 


3 






BIO 311 Genetics Lab 


1 







ESO 402 Mthds of Tchg ESOL 3 

17 

^Education majors who have completed two years of a foreign language in high school with a GPA of 
2.0 or higher are exempted from the University's foreign language requirements. 

Bachelor of Science 

Music Education K-12 



The major in Music Education provides students with educational theory, methods of teaching 
and management principles and practices. This teacher preparation program has a broad 

204 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 

foundation in many academic areas and specialization in all general areas of music. Students 
who complete this major are prepared for further study at the graduate or professional level. 
This degree program requires a minimum of 134 semester hours and may require an 
additional semester for completion. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Developing 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use lesson plans to align instruction with state- 
adopted standards at the appropriate level of rigor. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans for students to achieve 
mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use (lesson plans, management plans) to 
illustrate respect of students' cultural, linguistic and family background. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/communication resource 
lists to integrate current information and communication technologies. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will adapt the learning environment (through lesson 
plans or management plans) to accommodate the differing needs and diversity of students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will modify lesson plans/lesson delivery to respond 
to preconceptions or misconceptions. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will relate and integrate the subject matter with 
other disciplines and life experience to deliver engaging and challenging lessons. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will differentiate instructional plans based on an 
assessment of student learning needs and recognition of individual differences in students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/assessment reports to 
modify assessments and testing conditions to accommodate learning styles and varying levels 
of knowledge. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design assessment reports to apply technology 
to organize and integrate assessment information. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will engage in a targeted professional development 
plan and reflective practices. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will implement knowledge and skills learned in 
professional development in the teaching and learning process through lesson plans/narrative 
reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will identify ethical and moral behavior which 
adheres to the Code of Conduct illustrated in a classroom vignette/case study through their 
written reflection. 



205 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Teacher candidates at the developing level will analyze the relationship between the NEA and 
State of Florida Code of Ethics through written reflection. 

Synthesis 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will sequence lessons and concepts to ensure 
coherence and required prior knowledge in lesson plans. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will select appropriate formative assessments to 
monitor learning in lesson plans/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will convey high expectations to all students in lesson 
plans/observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will model clear, acceptable oral and written 
communication skills in lesson plans and lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will utilize current and emerging assistive 
technologies that enable students to participate in high-quality communication interactions and 
achieve their educational goals in (lesson plans and lesson observations). 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will deepen and enrich students' understanding 
through content area literacy strategies, verbalization of thought, and application of the subject 
matter in lesson plans/observation. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will identify gaps in students' subject matter 
knowledge in lesson plans and/or assessment plan and/or narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will employ higher-order questioning techniques in 
lesson plans and/or lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will complete an assessment report/lesson plans to 
design and align formative and summative assessments that match learning objectives and lead 
to mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will use a variety of assessment tools to monitor 
student progress, achievement and learning gains in an assessment report/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will design purposeful professional goals to strengthen 
the effectiveness of instruction based on students' needs. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will engage in professional dialogue, which 
demonstrates respect for individual differences and fairness with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 

Validating 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/narrative reflection, which 
vises a variety of data to evaluate learning outcomes, adjust planning and improve lesson 
effectiveness. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will provide learning experience through lesson plans 
that require students to demonstrate a variety of applicable skills and competencies. 

206 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Teacher candidates at the validating level will organize, allocate, and manage the resources of 
time, space, and attention within lesson delivery (lesson plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will manage individual and class behaviors through a 
well-planned management system (management plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will maintain a climate of openness, inquiry, fairness, 
and support (observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will apply varied instructional strategies and 
resources, including technology, to provide comprehensible instruction, and to teach for 
student understanding through lesson plans and observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will support, encourage, and provide immediate and 
specific feedback to students to promote student achievement through lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will utilize student feedback to monitor instructional 
needs and to adjust instruction through reflective analysis. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/assessment report, which 
analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to diagnose students' 
learning needs, informs instruction based on those needs, and drives the learning process. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will construct written reports to share the importance 
and outcomes of student assessment data with the student and the student's 
parent/caregiver(s). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will examine and use data-informed research to 
improve instruction and student achievement through case study/intervention plan 
implementation. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will collaborate with the home, school and larger 
communities to foster communication and to support student learning and continuous 
improvement through narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will demonstrate professional dispositions through 
adherence to professional, legal, and ethical responsibility with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 



Freshman 


Year 








First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 College Writing II 


3 


MAT 110 


Inter. Algebra 


3 


MAT 111 College Algebra 


3 


FMU 101 


University 101* 


3 


REA 101 Crit Think and Rdg or 


3 


MUS 101 


Struc. Of Mus I 


3 


ENG 111 First Yr. Lit 




MUS 


Major App Instr 


1 


MUS 102 Struct Music II 


3 


MUS 243 


Brasswind Techs 


1 


MUS Maj. App Instr 


1 


MUS 104 


Class Piano I 


I 


MUS 247 Woodwind Tech 


1 


MUS 


Required Ensemble 


1 


MUS 104 Class Piano II 


1 


MSU 300 


Music Sem/Rect 



16 


MUS Req Ensemble 

MUS 300 Mus Sem/Rect 


1 


16 



207 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 




Second Semester 




MAT 114 


Finite Math 


3 


MUB 311 Comp and Music 


3 


PSY 200 


Intro to Psychology 


3 


HIS 200 History of USA 


3 


MUS 209 


History of Music I 


3 


MUS 210 His of Music II 


3 


MUS201 


Struct of Music III 


3 


MUS 203 Struc of Music IV 


3 


MSU111 


Sight Sing/Ear I 


3 


MUS 211 Sight Sing/Ear II 


3 


MUS_ 


App Major Instr 


1 


MSU App Major Instr 


1 


MUS 257 


String Tech 


1 


MUS 267 Percussion Tech 


1 


EDU313 


Pre-Student Tchg 


1 


EDU 314 Pre-Student Tchg 


1 


Req 


Ensemble 


1 


Required Ensemble 


1 


MUS 300 


Music Sem/Rec 



18 


MUS 300 Mus Sem/ Rec 




18 


Junior Year 








First Semester 




Second Semester 




COM 103 


Intro to Prof Spkg 


3 


EDU 203 Psy/Soc Found Ed 


3 


REL 201 


Intro to Philosophy 


3 


ESO 402 Mthd Tchg ESOL 


3 


ENV 131 


Earth Science 


3 


EDU 205 Multicultural Div. 


3 


MUS 291 


Music Criticism 


3 


PSC 101 Physical Science 


3 


MUS 209 


His. Of Music III 


3 


EDU 426 Content Reading 


3 


MUS 


Applied Elective 


2 


MUS 312 Conducting 


3 




Ensemble Elective 


1 


MUS 238 Vocal Tech 


i 


EDU 313 


Pre-Student Tchg 


1 
19 




19 


Senior Year 








First Semester 




Second Semester 




BIO 101 


Biological Science 


3 


EDU 450 Internship 


9 


BIO 131 


Prin of Bio Lab 


1 


MUS Major Applied 


2 


EDU 431 


Tchg Music in K-12 


3 


MUS_ . Ensemble Elec 


I 


EDU 439 


Tst and Msmts 


3 






EDU 408 


Clsrm Beh Mgmt 


3 






EDU 308 


Teach Rea/E/S 


3 
16 




12 



Bachelor of Science in 

Physical Education K-12 

The major in Physical Education is designed to prepare students to develop technical skills and 
knowledge in physical education while emphasizing the psychomotor domain. Students who 
complete one of the physical education majors are prepared to teach or to do advance study. 
This degree program requires 130 credit hours for completion. In order to complete the degree 
in four years, students must take more than 15 credits a semester or attend at least one 
summer session. 



208 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Student Learning Outcomes 

Developing 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use lesson plans to align instruction with state- 
adopted standards at the appropriate level of rigor. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans for students to achieve 
mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use (lesson plans, management plans) to 
illustrate respect of students' cultural, linguistic and family background. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/communication resource 
lists to integrate current information and communication technologies. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will adapt the learning environment (through lesson 
plans or management plans) to accommodate the differing needs and diversity of students 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will modify lesson plans/lesson delivery to respond 
to preconceptions or misconceptions. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will relate and integrate the subject matter with 
other disciplines and life experience to deliver engaging and challenging lessons. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will differentiate instructional plans based on an 
assessment of student learning needs and recognition of individual differences in students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/assessment reports to 
modify assessments and testing conditions to accommodate learning styles and varying levels 
of knowledge. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design assessment reports to apply technology 
to organize and integrate assessment information. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will engage in a targeted professional development 
plan and reflective practices. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will implement knowledge and skills learned in 
professional development in the teaching and learning process through lesson plans/narrative 
reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will identify ethical and moral behavior which 
adheres to the Code of Conduct illustrated in a classroom vignette/case study through their 
written reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will analyze the relationship between the NEA and 
State of Florida Code of Ethics through written reflection. 



209 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Synthesis 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will sequence lessons and concepts to ensure 
coherence and required prior knowledge in lesson plans. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will select appropriate formative assessments to 
monitor learning in lesson plans/case smdy. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will convey high expectations to all students in lesson 
plans/observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will model clear, acceptable oral and written 
communication skills in lesson plans and lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will utilize current and emerging assistive 
technologies that enable students to participate in high-quality communication interactions and 
achieve their educational goals in (lesson plans and lesson observations). 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will deepen and enrich students' understanding 
through content area literacy strategies, verbalization of thought, and application of the subject 
matter in lesson plans/observation. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will identify gaps in students' subject matter 
knowledge in lesson plans and/or assessment plan and/or narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will employ higher-order questioning techniques in 
lesson plans and/or lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will complete an assessment report/lesson plans to 
design and align formative and summative assessments that match learning objectives and lead 
to mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will use a variety of assessment tools to monitor 
student progress, achievement and learning gains in an assessment report/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will design purposeful professional goals to strengthen 
the effectiveness of instruction based on students' needs. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will engage in professional dialogue, which 
demonstrates respect for individual differences and fairness with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 



Validating 



Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/narrative reflection, which 
uses a variety of data to evaluate learning outcomes, adjust planning and improve lesson 
effectiveness. 



210 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will provide learning experience through lesson plans 
that require students to demonstrate a variety of applicable skills and competencies. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will organize, allocate, and manage the resources of 
time, space, and attention within lesson delivery (lesson plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will manage individual and class behaviors through a 
well-planned management system (management plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will maintain a climate of openness, inquiry, fairness, 
and support (observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will apply varied instructional strategies and 
resources, including technology, to provide comprehensible instruction, and to teach for 
student understanding through lesson plans and observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will support, encourage, and provide immediate and 
specific feedback to students to promote student achievement through lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will utilize student feedback to monitor instructional 
needs and to adjust instruction through reflective analysis. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/assessment report, which 
analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to diagnose students' 
learning needs, informs instruction based on those needs, and drives the learning process. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will construct written reports to share the importance 
and outcomes of student assessment data with the student and the student's 
parent/caregiver(s). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will examine and use data-informed research to 
improve instruction and student achievement through case study/intervention plan 
implementation. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will collaborate with the home, school and larger 
communities to foster communication and to support student learning and continuous 
improvement through narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will demonstrate professional dispositions through 
adherence to professional, legal, and ethical responsibility with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 

Freshman Year 
First Semester 

ENG 101 College Writing I 
PED110 Dim of Wellness 
MAT 110 Intermediate Algebra 
FMU101 University 101* 
BIO 101 Biological Science 
PED 210/212 Adv. Swim 



211 





Second Semester 




3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


2 


REA 101 


Crit Think/Rdg or 


3 


3 


ENG 111 


First Yr. Lit 




3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 


3 


PSC 101 


Physical Science 


3 


1 


HIS 103 


Af. Am. His 


3 




COM 103 


Intro to Pub Spkg 


3 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



15 



18 



Sophomore Year 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



TSY 200 Intro to Psy 


3 


EDU 206 


Tchg in M/S 


3 


MAT 1 14 Finite Mat 


3 


PED 301 


His & Phy of Spts 


3 


EDU 203 Psy/ Soc Found ED 


3 


BIO 200 


Hum Ana & Phys 


3 


REL 20 1 Intro to Philosophy 


3 


BIO 201 


Hum Ana Lab 


1 


HIS 200 History of USA 


3 


EDU 205 


Mul. Cu Div. 


3 


ENV 131 Earth Science 


3 
18 


PED 316 


Prin & Ana Tm Spts 


2 

1 


Junior Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 





PED 301 His & Phi Team Sports 

EDU 313 Pre-Student Tchg 

EDU 426 Content Reading 

PED 322 Theory/Coaching 

PED 323 Indv & Grup Act 

PED 403 Ada/Corr. P.E. 

EDU 331 Instru. Tech 



3 PED 410 Care & Prevention 3 

1 ESO402 Mthd of Teh ESOL 3 
3 PED 408 Kinesiology 3 
3 EDU 314 Pre-Student Tchg 1 

2 PED 401 Org & Admin P.E 3 

3 PED 308 Mvmt. Skills & Dance 2 
3_ PED 407 Excer Physiology 3 
18 18 



Senior Year 
First Semester 



EDU 412 
EDU 439 
PED 411 
EDU 315 
EDU 408 
EDU 426 



TchgPEinK-12 

Tst. & Msmts 
Psychomotor Lrng 
Pre-Student Tchg 
Clsrm Beh Mgmt 
Content Reading 



3 
3 
3 
I 

3 
3 
16 



Second Semester 

EDU 450 Internship 9 
Fine Arts Requirements 3 



12 



Bachelor of Science in 



Secondary English Education /ESOL (6-12) 



The major in Secondary English Edueation/ESOL (6-12) provides students with a strong content 
knowledge base, educational theory, and practice, methods of teaching and management 
principles and practices. Students will also complete an endorsement in reading. Students who 
complete this major are prepared to teach students from diverse backgrounds and for further 
study at the graduate professional level. In order to complete the degree in four years, 
students must take more than 15 credits a semester or attend at least one summer session. 



212 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Developing 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use lesson plans to align instruction with state- 
adopted standards at the appropriate level of rigor. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans for students to achieve 
mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use (lesson plans, management plans) to 
illustrate respect of students' cultural, linguistic and family background. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/communication resource 
lists to integrate current information and communication technologies. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will adapt the learning environment (through lesson 
plans or management plans) to accommodate the differing needs and diversity of students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will modify lesson plans/lesson delivery to respond 
to preconceptions or misconceptions. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will relate and integrate the subject matter with 
other disciplines and life experience to deliver engaging and challenging lessons. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will differentiate instructional plans based on an 
assessment of student learning needs and recognition of individual differences in students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/assessment reports to 
modify assessments and testing conditions to accommodate learning styles and varying levels 
of knowledge. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design assessment reports to apply technology 
to organize and integrate assessment information. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will engage in a targeted professional development 
plan and reflective practices. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will implement knowledge and skills learned in 
professional development in the teaching and learning process through lesson plans/narrative 
reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will identify ethical and moral behavior which 
adheres to the Code of Conduct illustrated in a classroom vignette/case study through their 
written reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will analyze the relationship between the NEA and 
State of Florida Code of Ethics through written reflection. 

Synthesis 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will sequence lessons and concepts to ensure 
coherence and required prior knowledge in lesson plans. 

213 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will select appropriate formative assessments to 
monitor learning in lesson plans/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will convey high expectations to all students in lesson 
plans/observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will model clear, acceptable oral and written 
communication skills in lesson plans and lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will utilize current and emerging assistive 
technologies that enable students to participate in high-quality communication interactions and 
achieve their educational goals in (lesson plans and lesson observations). 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will deepen and enrich students' understanding 
through content area literacy strategies, verbalization of thought, and application of the subject 
matter in lesson plans/observation. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will identify gaps in students' subject matter 
knowledge in lesson plans and/or assessment plan and/or narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will employ higher-order questioning techniques in 
lesson plans and/or lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will complete an assessment report/lesson plans to 
design and align formative and summative assessments that match learning objectives and lead 
to mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will use a variety of assessment tools to monitor 
student progress, achievement and learning gains in an assessment report/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will design purposeful professional goals to strengthen 
the effectiveness of instruction based on students' needs. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will engage in professional dialogue, which 
demonstrates respect foi individual differences and fairness with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 

Validating 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/narrative reflection, which 
uses a variety of data to evaluate learning outcomes, adjust planning and improve lesson 
effectiveness. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will provide learning experience through lesson plans 
that require students to demonstrate a variety of applicable skills and competencies. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will organize, allocate, and manage the resources of 
time, space, and attention within lesson delivery (lesson plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will manage individual and class behaviors through a 
well-planned management system (management plan/observation). 



214 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



201 1-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Teacher candidates at the validating level will maintain a climate of openness, inquiry, fairness, 
and support (observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will apply varied instructional strategies and 
resources, including technology, to provide comprehensible instruction, and to teach for 
student understanding through lesson plans and observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will support, encourage, and provide immediate and 
specific feedback to students to promote student achievement through lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will utilize student feedback to monitor instructional 
needs and to adjust instruction through reflective analysis. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/assessment report, which 
analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to diagnose students' 
learning needs, informs instruction based on those needs, and drives the learning process. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will construct written reports to share the importance 
and outcomes of student assessment data with the student and the student's 
parent/caregiver(s). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will examine and use data-informed research to 
improve instruction and student achievement through case study/intervention plan 
implementation. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will collaborate with the home, school and larger 
communities to foster communication and to support student learning and continuous 
improvement through narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will demonstrate professional dispositions through 
adherence to professional, legal, and ethical responsibility with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 

Graduation Requirements 

This degree program requires 129 semester hours for completion. 



Freshman 


Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




ENG 101 


College Writing I 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


ENV131 


Earth Science 


3 


BIO 101 


Biological Science 


3 


MAT 101 


College Math 1 


3 


BIO 131 


Biological Sci. Lab 


1 


FMC101 


Ed & Life Seminar* 


3 


REA 101 


Crit Think/ Rdg or 




PED 110 


Dim. Of Wellness 


2 


ENG 111 


First Yr. Lit. 


3 


COM 103 


Intro to Pub Speak 


3 


HIS 103 


Afr. Amer. His 


3 






17 


MAT 105 


Interg. Mth. 


3 

16 



Sophomore Year 
First Semester 



ENG 212 



Ethnic Literature 



Second Semester 

HIS 200 History of USA 



215 



Florida Memorial University 
A Promise. A Future. 



2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Rl 1 201 


Intro to Philosophy 


3 


PSY 200 


Intro. Psychology 


3 


PSC 101 


Physical Science 


3 


MAT 111 


College Algebra 


3 
15 


junior Year 






First Semester 




ENG 303 


British Literature 


3 


ENG 309 


Adv. Gram. & Com 


3 


ENG 316 


Afr. Amer. Women Writ. 


3 


EDU 331 


Instru. Tech 


3 


EDU313 


Pre-Stud Tchg 


3 


EDU 427 


Teh Lang Arts 


3 
16 


Senior Year 






First Semester 




ENG 460 


Applied Linguistics 


3 


EDU 429 


Rem. Tchg in Reading 


3 


EDU 408 


Clsrm Beh Mgnt 


3 


EDU411 


Diag & Rem 


3 


EDU 418 


Met. Of Tchg Eng M/S 


3 


EDU 315 


Pre-Stud. Tchg 


I 



EDU 203 


Psy/Soc Found 


ENG 308 


Afr. Amer. Lit 


EDU 206 


Tchg. Mid/Sch 


EDU 205 


Multicultural Div. 


DRA 20(1 


Drama Apprec. 


Second Semester 


EDU 308 


Tchg Rdg in E/S 


ENG 315 


Adolescent Lit 


ESO 402 


Mthds of Tchg 


EDU 439 


Tsts & Msmts 


ENG 444 


Mythology 


EDU 426 


Content Reading 


EDU 314 


Pre-Stud Tchg 


Second Semester 


EDU 450 


Internship 


EDU 405 


Creative Writing 


EDU 432 


Reading Practicum 



lh 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
is 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
19 



15 



Bachelor of Science in 

Secondary Mathematics Education (6-12) 

The major in Secondary Mathematics Education is designed to provide mathematics education 
majors with education theory, content knowledge, pedagogical skills, and management 
principles and practices. Students who complete this major are prepared for further study at 
the graduate level, for professional school or teaching at the secondary level. This degree 
program requires at least 133 credits hours for completion. In order to complete the degree in 
four years, students must take more than 15 credits a semester or attend at least one summer 
session. 

Student Learning Outcomes 

Developing 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use lesson plans to align instruction with state- 
adopted standards at the appropriate level of rigor. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans for students to achieve 
mastery. 



216 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will use (lesson plans, management plans) to 
illustrate respect of students' cultural, linguistic and family background. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/communication resource 
lists to integrate current information and communication technologies. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will adapt the learning environment (through lesson 
plans or management plans) to accommodate the differing needs and diversity of students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will modify lesson plans/lesson delivery to respond 
to preconceptions or misconceptions. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will relate and integrate the subject matter with 
other disciplines and life experience to deliver engaging and challenging lessons. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will differentiate instructional plans based on an 
assessment of student learning needs and recognition of individual differences in students. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design lesson plans/assessment reports to 
modify assessments and testing conditions to accommodate learning styles and varying levels 
of knowledge. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will design assessment reports to apply technology 
to organize and integrate assessment information. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will engage in a targeted professional development 
plan and reflective practices. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will implement knowledge and skills learned in 
professional development in the teaching and learning process through lesson plans/narrative 
reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will identify ethical and moral behavior which 
adheres to the Code of Conduct illustrated in a classroom vignette/case study through their 
written reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the developing level will analyze the relationship between the NEA and 
State of Florida Code of Ethics through written reflection. 

Synthesis 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will sequence lessons and concepts to ensure 
coherence and required prior knowledge in lesson plans. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will select appropriate formative assessments to 
monitor learning in lesson plans/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will convey high expectations to all students in lesson 
plans/observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will model clear, acceptable oral and written 
communication skills in lesson plans and lesson observations. 

217 



Florida Memorial University 

A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will utilize current and emerging assistive 
technologies that enable students to participate in high-quality communication interactions and 
achieve their educational goals in (lesson plans and lesson observations). 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will deepen and enrich students' understanding 
through content area literacy strategies, verbalization of thought, and application of the subject 
matter in lesson plans/observation. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will identify gaps in students' subject matter 
knowledge in lesson plans and/or assessment plan and/or narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will employ higher-order questioning techniques in 
lesson plans and/or lesson observations. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will complete an assessment report/lesson plans to 
design and align formative and summative assessments that match learning objectives and lead 
to mastery. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will use a variety of assessment tools to monitor 
student progress, achievement and learning gains in an assessment report/case study. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will design purposeful professional goals to strengthen 
the effectiveness of instruction based on students' needs. 

Teacher candidates at the synthesis level will engage in professional dialogue, which 
demonstrates respect for individual differences and fairness with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 

Validating 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/narrative reflection, which 
uses a variety of data to evaluate learning outcomes, adjust planning and improve lesson 
effectiveness. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will provide learning experience through lesson plans 
that require students to demonstrate a variety of applicable skills and competencies. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will organize, allocate, and manage the resources of 
time, space, and attention within lesson delivery (lesson plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will manage individual and class behaviors through a 
well-planned management system (management plan/observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will maintain a climate of openness, inquiry, fairness, 
and support (observation). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will apply varied instructional strategies and 
resources, including technology, to provide comprehensible instruction, and to teach for 
student understanding through lesson plans and observations. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will support, encourage, and provide immediate and 
specific feedback to students to promote student achievement through lesson observations. 

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Teacher candidates at the validating level will utilize student feedback to monitor instructional 
needs and to adjust instruction through reflective analysis. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will design a case study/assessment report, which 
analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to diagnose students' 
learning needs, informs instruction based on those needs, and drives the learning process. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will construct written reports to share the importance 
and outcomes of student assessment data with the student and the student's 
parent/caregiver(s). 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will examine and vise data-informed research to 
improve instruction and student achievement through case study/intervention plan 
implementation. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will collaborate with the home, school and larger 
communities to foster communication and to support student learning and continuous 
improvement through narrative reflection. 

Teacher candidates at the validating level will demonstrate professional dispositions through 
adherence to professional, legal, and ethical responsibility with all stakeholders through 
observation/narrative reflection. 



Freshman Year 










First Semester 




Second Semester 




FMU 101 University 101* 


3 


ENG 102 


College Writing II 


3 


ENG 101 College Writing I 


3 


PED110 


Dim of Wellness 


2 


MAT 111 College Algebra 


3 


MAT 112 


Pre Calculus 


3 


BIO 130 Prin of Biology 


3 


COM 103 


Intro to Pub Spkg 


3 


BIO 131 Prin of Bio Lab I 


1 


PHY 110 


Gen. Physics 


3 


REA 101 Crit Think and Rdg 


3 


PHY 111 


Gen. Physics Lab 


I 


Or 




HIS 103 


Afr. Amer. History 


3 



ENG 111 First Yr. Lit 



16 



is 



Sophomore Year 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



HIS 200 History of USA 


3 


REL 201 Intro to Philosophy 


3 


ENV 131 Earth Science 


3 


MAT 201 Calculus I 


3 


MAT 113 Trigonometry 


3 


MAT 210 Discrete Mth 


3 


MAT 205 Prob& Stats 


3 


HIS 200 History of USA 


3 


PSY 200 Intro to Psychology 


3 


EDU 203 Psy/Soc Found Edu 


3 


Fine Arts Req 


3 


EDU 206 Tea in M/S Sch 


3 




18 




18 


Junior Year 








First Semester 




Second Semester 





MAT 202 Clg. Calculus II 3 

Program Language 3 

MAT 307 Number Theory 3 
MAT 303 Hist of Math 3 
Approve Math Elec 3 



ES0 402 Met of Teach ESOL 3 

EDU 426 Content Reading 3 

EDU 205 Multicultural Div 3 

MAT 301 Calculus III 3 

EDU 314 Pre-Student Tchg \ 



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EDU313 Pre-Student Tchg 1 MAT 309 Int to Modern Alg. 3 

EDU 308 Tchg, Reading in Ele 3 

19 16 

Senior Year 

First Semester Second Semester 

MAT 350 Linear Algebra 3 EDU 450 Internship 9 

EDU 331 Instructional Tech 3 Literature Req. 3 

EDU 439 Tst and Msmts 3 

EDU 408 Clsrm Beh. Mgmt 3 

EDU 424 Chg Math Sec Sch 3 

EDU 315 Pre-Student Techg 1 

16 12 

Minor in Health Education 

Students seeking a minor in health education will complete a minimum of 18 redit hours listed 
in the core curriculum below. All classes are to be selected by the student in consultation with a 
divisional advisor and must be completed with a grade of C or higher. 

Core Requirements 

Number Name Credits 

PED 314 Social and Community Health 3 

BIO 200 Human Anatomy & Physiology 3 

BIO 201 Human Anatomy & Physiology Lab 1 



HED 221 Nutritional Health 



3 



Students may choose a minimum of two of the following courses: 

Number Name Credits 

PED 213 Safety & First Aid 2 

PED 202 Personal Hygiene & Fitness 1 

HED 211 Human Sexuality 3 

HED 231 Substance Abuse 3 

HED 311 Communicable Disease 3 

HED 321 Environmental Health 3 

HED 411 Mental & Emotional Health 3 

HED 421 Consumer Health 3 

Certification requirements for the following areas are also available through the division of 

education: 

Health Education 

Music 

Spanish 

Mathematics 

Biology 

Middle Grades General Science 

English 



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Course Descriptions 

All course descriptions listed below are arranged alphabetically by subject area, alphabetically by prefix, and then 
numerically for those descriptions with the same prefix. The digits in parentheses immediately following the course 
titles represent the respective semester credit hours given for a course. The first digit of the course number generally 
indicates the classification level: — non-college, 1— freshman, 2— sophomore, 3— junior, 4 — senior. The abbreviated 
codes F, Sp, Su represent the term(s) in which the course is offered, Fall, Spring and Summer, respectively. 

Subject Area Course Prefix(es) 

Accounting ACC 

Air Force ROTC AIS 

ArmyROTC MSL 

Aviation Sciences AWS 

Aviation Technology AVT 

Biology BIO 

Business Management BUS 

Chemistry CHE 

Chinese CHI 

Communications COM 

Computer Sciences CSC 

Criminal Justice CRJ 

Dance DAN 

Drama DRA 

Economics ECO 

Education EDU 

English for Speakers of Other Languages ESOL 

English ENG 

English as a Second Language ESL 

Environmental Studies ENV 

Exceptional Student Education ESE 

Finance FIN 

Flight Education AVT 

French FRE 

General Education CLS, FMU, REA 

History HIS 

Geography GEO 

Health Education HED 

Honors ENG, MAT, SEM, HIS, SCI, RSC 

Human Resource Management HRM 

Marketing MAR 

Mathematics MAT 

Music MUS 

Music Business MUB 

Philosophy PHI 

Physical Education PED 

Physical Science PSC 

Physics PHY 

Political Science POL 

Portfolio Seminar POR 

Pre-College/Development Studies DSE, DSM, DSR 

Pre-Engineering PEG 

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Psychology PSY 

Public Administration PAD 

Reading REA 

Religion REL 

Safety SAF 

Social Sciences SSC 

Social Work SOW 

Sociology SOC 

Spanish SPA 

Theatre THE 

Visual Arts ART 

Accounting 

ACC 211 Principles of Accounting I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MAT 110 or MAT 111. A study of basic accounting concepts essential to recording 
business transactions, preparing financial statements, and interpreting data for financial 
decisions 

ACC 212 Principles of Accounting II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: ACC 211. A continuation of ACC 211 and the study of basic accounting concepts 
essential to recording business transactions, preparing financial statements, and interpreting 
data for financial decisions. 

ACC 311 Intermediate Accounting I (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: ACC 212. An in-depth analysis of the underlying concepts of external financial 
reporting including the preparation and presentation of financial statements. 

ACC 312 Intermediate Accounting II (3) Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: ACC 311. A continuation of ACC 311 and the in-depth analysis of the underlying 
concepts of external financial reporting including the preparation and presentation of financial 
statements. 

ACC 352 Managerial Accounting (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: ACC 212. A study of the preparation, analysis, and interpretation of accounting 
data for management decision-making. The use of computer applications is emphasized. 

ACC 411 Advanced Accounting (3) F 

Prerequisite: ACC 312. A study of the theory and practice of accounting for business 
combinations, multinational enterprises, governmental, and not-for-profit entities. 



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ACC 431 Auditing I (3) F 

Prerequisite: ACC 312. A study of auditing and attestation standards and procedures. Ethics, 
the responsibilities of auditors, the collection of evidence, and reporting are examined. 

ACC 432 Auditing II (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: ACC 431. A continuation of Auditing I with an in-depth review of internal control, 
the audit program, and audit procedures. Computer applications are applied to various audit 
problems. 

ACC 434 Federal Income Tax I (3) F 

Prerequisite: ACC 312. A study of federal income taxation with an emphasis on the taxation of 

individuals. A comprehensive individual income tax return is prepared. Income tax planning and tax 
research are introduced. 

ACC 435 Federal Income Tax II (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: ACC 434. A study of the taxation of partnerships, corporations, estates and trusts, and not- 
for-profit entities. Income tax research is emphasized. Comprehensive income tax returns are prepared. 

ACC 452 Cost Accounting (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: ACC 212. A study of the procedures and principles of cost accounting. Emphasis is on the 
accumulation, reporting, and use of cost information for purposes of managerial decision-making. - 

ACC 454 Computer Accounting (Senior Project) (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: ACC 212 and CSC 101. This course features the use of accounting software in the application 
of accounting principles with emphasis on new microcomputer technology, database management, 
general ledger, and spreadsheet analysis. 

ACC 455 International Accounting (3) F 

Prerequisite: ACC 312 or Advisor's Recommendation. A study of international accounting standards, efforts 
to harmonize accounting standards, problems of accounting for multinational companies, and a 
comparative analysis of accounting practices in different countries. 

ACC 461 Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting (3) F 

Prerequisite: ACC 312. An analysis of the characteristics and environment of governmental and 
nonprofit entities, and an in-depth study of the basic concepts and standards of such entities. 

ACC 487 Seminar in Accounting (3) F 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and approval of the Chairperson Consideration of current issues in Accounting. 
Readings required from current accounting publications and other related periodicals. 

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Air Force ROTC 

AIS 101 - Foundations for the United States Air Force I (Lecture - 1 credit) 

Aerospace Studies 101 is designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and Air Force 
Reserve Officers Training Corps. Featured topics include: Air Force heritage, military customs and 
courtesies, Air Force officer career opportunities, Air Force core values, interpersonal communication and 
team building. 

AIS 102 - Foundations for the United States Air Force II (Lecture - 1 credit) 

This survey course briefly covers topics relating to the Air Force and defense. It focuses on the structure 
and missions of Air Force organizations, officership and professionalism. Also introduces effective 
communication skills. 



AIS 201 - The Evolution of USAF and Space Power I (Lecture - 1 credit) 

Aerospace Studies 201 is a knowledge course designed to examine general aspects of air and space power 
through a historical perspective. Utilizing this perspective, the course covers a time period from the first 
balloons and dirigibles to the space age. 

AIS 202 - The Evolution of USAF and Space Power II (Lecture - 1 credit) 

This survey course is concerned with the beginnings of manned flight and the development of aerospace 
power in the United States, including the employment of air power in WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, the 
Gulf War and the peaceful employment of U.S. air power in civic actions, scientific missions and support 
of space exploration. 

AIS 301 - Air Force Leadership Studies I (Lecture - 3 credits) 

Aerospace Studies 301 is a course designed to examine several key aspects of leadership. The course starts 
with a basic overview of leadership and moves into basic skills in leadership. The course also directs the 
cadets' attention to advanced skills in leadership and concludes with ethics in leadership. 

AIS 302 - Air Force Leadership Studies II (Lecture - 3 credits) 

This course is a study in the anatomy of leadership, the need for quality and management leadership, the 
role of discipline in leadership situations and the variables affecting leadership. Case studies are used to 
examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising 
practical application of the concepts. Students will deal with actual problems and complete projects 
associated with planning and managing the Leadership Laboratory. 

AIS 401 - National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty I (Lecture - 3 credits) 

This course is designed to examine the national security process regional studies, advanced leadership 
ethics, and Air Force doctrine. In addition, students will study topics that will prepare them for their first 
active-duty assignment as officers in the Air Force. 

AIS 402 - National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty II (Lecture - 3 credits) 

Learn about the role of the professional military leader in a democratic society; societal attitudes toward 
the armed forces; the requisites for maintaining adequate national defense structure; the impact of 
technological and international developments on strategic preparedness and the overall policy-making 
process; and military law. 

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Army ROTC 

MSL 101 - Foundations of Officership (1), MSL 1001L Leadership Laboratory (0) 

In this coursestudents will: examine the unique duties and responsibilities of officers; discusses the 
organization and role of the Army; review the basic life skills pertaining to fitness and communication; 
and analyze the Army values and expected ethical behavior. 

MSL 102 - Basic Leadership (1), MSL 1002L Leadership Laboratory (0) 

In this course students will: learn the fundamental leadership concepts and doctrine; practice the basic 
skills that underlie effective problem solving; apply active listening and feedback skills; examine factors 
that influence the leader and group effectiveness; and examine the officer experience. 

MSL 201 - Individual Leadership Studies (2) MSL 2101L Leadership Laboratory (0) 

In this course students will develop knowledge of self, self-confidence, individual leadership skills, 
problem solving and critical thinking skills. In addition, students will apply communication, feedback, 
and conflict resolution skills. 

MSL 202 - Leadership and Teamwork (2), MSL 2102L Leadership Laboratory (0) 

In this coursestudents will: focus on self-development guided by knowledge of self and group processes; 
challenge current beliefs, knowledge, and skills; and provide equivalent preparation for the ROTC 
Advanced Course as the Leader's Training Course. 

MSL 301 - Leadership and Problem Solving (3), MSL 3201L Leadership Laboratory (0) 

In this course students will examine basic skills that underlie effective problem solving. In addition, 
students will: analyze the role officers played in the transition of the Army from Vietnam to the 
21st Century; review the features and execution of the Leadership Development Program (LDP); analyze 
military missions and plan military operations; and execute squad battle drills. 

MSL 302 - Leadership and Ethics (3), MSL 3202L Leadership Laboratory (0) 

In this sectionstudents will: probe leader responsibilities that foster an ethical command climate; develop 
cadet leadership competencies; prepare for success at Leader Development and Assessment Course 
(LDAC); recognize leader responsibility to accommodate subordinate spiritual needs; and apply 
principles and techniques of effective written and oral communication. 

MSL 401 - Leadership and Management (3) MSL 4301L Leadership Laboratory (0) 

In this coursestudents will: build on Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) experience to 
solve organizational and staff problems; discuss staff organization, functions and processes; analyze 
counseling responsibilities and methods; examine principles of subordinate motivation and 
organizational change; and apply leadership and problem solving principles to the complex case 
study/simulation. 

MSL 402 - Officership (3), MSL 4302L Leadership Laboratory (0) 

This capstone course is designed to explore topics relevant to second lieutenants entering the Army. In 
addition, students will: describe legal aspects of decision making and leadership; analyze Army 
organization for operations from the tactical to strategic level; assess administrative and logistics 
management functions; discuss reporting and permanent change of station (PCS) process; perform 
platoon leader actions; and examine leader responsibilities that foster an ethical command climate. 

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MSL 440 - United States Military History (3) 

This course examines the Military Heritage of the United States from colonial wars to the present as well 
as focuses on the operational and strategic levels of warfare. 

MSL 490 - Miscellaneous, Supervised and/or Independent Study (1-3) 

This course entails supervised reading and an independent study of United States Military History and 
writing requirements. Permission of the instructor is required. 

Art 

ARH 101 Art History (3) F 

Art History is a survey course to investigate the vital functions the arts have served in formation of 
society from prehistory through the late Medieval period, the early Renaissance to the Modern Arts 
period, the late nineteenth century to the present, inclusive of developments in American Art and 
contributions of African American, women, and minority artists. 

ARH 320 African American Art (3) F 

This program is an investigative research/survey course, tracing and exploring the history and 
development of artists of African descent and their contributions to the plastic arts- such as painting, 
sculpture, architecture, and the craft arts- with a comparative analysis to their Euro-Angelo counterparts, 
emphasis on artistic contribution by African American 17 th through the 21 st century. 

ARH 104 Modern Art (3) F 

Modern Art is an investigative survey course of the art with emphasis on artistic compositions from the 
mid to late nineteenth century through the twentieth century to the present- painting, sculpture, 
printmaking, and architecture- produced in Western Europe and America: its development from the late 
Renaissance to Romanticism, Neo-Classicism to Realism, Impressionism, Post- Impressionistic styles and 
movements. 

ARH 121 Beginning Design (3) F 

Beginning Design is an introductory level studio art course to help students develop an understanding of 
the various organizational possibilities in designing for two and three dimensional works, with emphasis 
on the study of application of the elements of art according to the principles of organization/design to 
create formal unity in a composition, in a variety of media 

ARH 131 Drawing I (3) Sp 

Drawing I is a basic level course introducing students to fundamental drawing skills, and techniques 
from a freehand approach, with emphasis on observation and interpretation of visual images and ideas, 
and traditional approach to line, composition, form, perspective, and shading, to create a sense of 
volume, proportion, and the illusion of space, through use of varied drawing media-pencil, pen and ink, 
charcoal, conte crayon- and subject matter. 

ARH 200 Art Appreciation (3) F, Sp, Su 

An exploratory course to the dynamics of the Visual Arts, investigating both the motivation of the artists 
to the mechanics of creating from a theoretical and applicational perspective of the different medias - 
painting, sculpting, drawing, printmaking, crafting, and architecture — with an infusion of historical 
significance to the vital function of art in society. 

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ARH 221 Graphic Design I (3) F 

Graphic Design is a studio course with emphasis on form, content, and principles of design and lay-out 
composition, where students are challenged to create visual composition, a complete product package 
from conception, package design, typography, to mock product make-up. 

ARH 231 Painting I (3) Sp 

Painting I is a beginning level studio art course focusing on the fundamentals of painting techniques, 
materials, and color application, emphasizing the process of painting in medias- watercolor, tempera, 
acrylic, gouache, and experimentation with mixed media. 

ARH 241 Printmaking I (3) F 

Printmaking is a studio art course introducing students to basic printmaking techniques, processes, and 
equipment, with emphasis on image development in mono-print, intaglio, relief, stencil, woodcut, 
linoleum, and collagraphy, with exploration into multiple color separation and printing, transferring 
original drawings and ideas to the print media. 

ARH 321 Commercial Art (3) F 

Commercial Art is a studio art course that provides an overview of the advertising design industry, with 
student exposure to creating compositions for such purposes as advertising, illustration, and the design, 
embellishment, decoration of industrial products, focusing on collaboration in creation of product from 
conceptualization of idea, to the creation of a product that embodies the aspiration, inspiration of a client, 
emphasizing visual image development and execution. 

ARH 331 Mural Painting (3) Sp 

Mural Art explores both historical and contemporary approaches to mural painting, public art, materials 
techniques and surface treatment, where students will create images to be painted on panels in simulation 
of wall or perspective while creating images appropriate to architectural settings interior and exterior, 
dealing with themes of social issues or creative embellishment. 

ARH 341 Sculpture I (3) F 

Sculpture I is a beginning level studio art course exploring traditional and contemporary sculptural 
processes, techniques and materials through the additive, subtractive, arid manipulative method, in select 
medias- clay, plaster, wood, and heavy board —compositions in free-standing, full round, relief, and 
linear. 

ARH 421 Illustration (3) Sp 

Illustration is a studio art course aimed at the production of techniques, design elements, media choice, 
typography, and conceptual imagery in conceptualization to a range of materials and techniques, 
explored through drawing and painting techniques with various media, as observed in advertising and 
graphic design. 

Aviation Sciences 

AVT 201 Private Pilot Certification - Ground (3) F 

Designed to prepare students for the FAA Private Pilot Written Examination. Subject areas covered in the 
course include basic aerodynamics, navigation, weather, communications, aircraft operations, weight and 
balance, various publications, and the Federal Aviation Regulations. 

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AVT 202 Private Pilot Certification - Flight (2) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: AVT 201. Designed to provide students with the flight experience necessary for the FAA 
Private Pilot Certification. 

AVT 203 Navigation and Performance (3) Sp 

This course provides students with skills and knowledge necessary to successfully complete the 
navigation and performance requirements specified for instrument and commercial pilots. It will focus on 
both jet and reciprocating 
aircraft and include high performance/high altitude turbine applications. 

AVT 301 Instrument Rating - Ground (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: AVT 201 and AVT 202. Designed to prepare students for the FAA Instrument Written 
Examination. Subject areas covered in the course include the IFR air traffic system, various publications 
and regulations, IFR navigation and aids, IFR charts, instrument approaches, and weather. 

AVT 302 Instrument Rating - Flight (2) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: AVT 301. Designed to prepare students for and provide students with the flight experience 
necessary for the FAA Instrument rating. 

AVT 303 Commercial Pilot Certification -Ground (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: AVT 201 and AVT 202. Designed to prepare students for the FAA Commercial Pilot Written 
Examination. Subject areas covered in the course include aerodynamics, high performance and complex 
airplane operations, weight and balance, NTSB reporting requirements, various publications, and the 
FARs. 

AVT 304 Commercial Pilot Certification - Flight (2) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: AVT 303. Designed to prepare and to provide students with the flight experience necessary 
for the FAA Commercial Pilot Certification. 

AVT 305 Multiengine Rating - Flight (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: AVT 301, AVT 302, AVT 303, and AVT 304. Designed to provide students with the flight 
experience necessary to meet the FAA requirements for the multi-engine class rating. 

AVT 401 Principles of Flight Instructing I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: AVT 201 mid AVT 202. Designed to prepare students for the FAA Fundamentals of 
Instructing Written Examination and for the FAA Basic Ground Instructor Written Examination. 

AVT 402 Principles of Flight Instructing II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: AVT 301, 302, 303, 304, and 401. Designed to prepare students for the FAA Advanced Ground 
Instructor Written Examination and the Instrument Ground Instructor Written Examination. 

AVT 405 Multiengine Aircraft Systems (3) F 

Prerequisite: AWS 201. This course will focus on the aircraft systems, hydraulics, flight, and fuel, as they 
relate to modern jet powered aircraft. 



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AVT 411 Certified Flight Instructor - Airplane (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: AVT 301, AVT 302, AVT 303, and AVT 304. Co-requisite: AVT 401. Designed to provide 
students with the flight experience necessary for the FAA Certified Flight Instructor Certificate with an 
Airplane Single-engine Land Rating. 

AVT 412 Certified Flight Instructor - Instrument (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: AVT 411. Co-requisite: AVT 402. Designed to provide students with the flight experience 
necessary for the FAA Certified Flight Instructor Certificate with an Instrument Airplane Rating. 

AVT 413 Certified Flight Instructor - Multiengine (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: AVT 411. Co-requisite: AVT 402. Designed to provide students with the flight experience 
necessary for the FAA Certified Flight Instructor Certificate with a Multi-Engine Land Rating. 

AWS 200 Aviation History (3) F 

A presentation dealing with the history of aviation and flight from the early attempts to the modern space 
age. The equipment and the flyers are considered, as well as the underlying developmental rationale for 
the events and hardware. 

AWS 201 Introduction to Aeronautics (3) F 

Presents an overview of aviation, enabling the student to gain an appreciation of the complexities of the 
field of aeronautics. Course content includes historical background, fundamentals of flight and 
aeronautical technology, the social and economic impact of aerospace and future developments, and 
government regulations. 

AWS 210 Basic Aerodynamics (3) F 

Prerequisite: AWS 201 or AVT 201. The history and development of aerodynamic theory will be 
introduced, and the student will become familiar with airfoil theory and wing theory. Basic performance 
parameters will include the use of performance charts. The course will stress subsonic incompressible 
flow and supersonic compressible flow. Special consideration will be given to transonic flight. 

AWS 232 Air Traffic Control (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: AWS 201 or AVT 201. A study of the national air traffic control system with emphasis on basic 
air traffic control procedures. Course content includes the role of air route traffic control centers, 
approach controls, control towers, and flight service stations. Also covers communications, navigation 
procedures, radar operations, and facilities. 

AWS 235 Air Traffic Control Operations I (3) F 

This course will introduce the student to Air Traffic Control operations. These procedures will be studied 
from the publication prepared for the National Air Traffic Training Program and other training material. 

AWS 240 Aviation Weather (3) F, Su 

An exploration of various cloud formations, formation of warm, cold, occluded, and stationary fronts, the 
life of thunderstorms, winds (both surface and aloft), icing, and many other weather phenomena. 
Emphasis will be placed on operations in cold weather and low visibility, windshear and microburst 
detection, information formats, weather radar, TCAS, and the role and responsibilities of ATC in weather 
observation and reporting. 



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AWS 250 Physical Geography (3) F 

A study of the basic concepts of weather and climate, landforms, and topography leading to an 
understanding of the earth as the human environment. 

AWS 270 Aircraft Engines (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: AWS 201 or AVT 201. This course will study aircraft engines to include reciprocating and 
various turbine configurations. Mechanical relationships, components, power calculations, and 
performance charts will be emphasized. 

AWS 301 Principles of Transportation (3) F 

Prerequisite: AWS 201 or AVT 201. An introduction, survey, and analysis of transportation including rail, 
motor, air, water, pipeline, and mass transit, with a look at their impact on the social and economic 
system of the U. S. 

AWS 302 Meteorology (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: AWS 250. Application of meteorological principles to flight operations. Topics include 
weather observations and forecasts, weather maps, NOTAMS, international weather patterns and 
information formats, weather radar, TCAS, and the role and responsibilities of ATC in weather 
observation and reporting. 

AWS 305 VFR Tower Operations (3) F 

Prerequisite: AWS 232. Designed to familiarize students with Air Traffic Control procedures in the visual 
environment. Emphasis is placed on the responsibilities of local, ground, flight data, and coordinator 
positions. Also included are the regulations which govern flight under visual conditions, separation in the 
terminal area, and development of controller techniques. 

AWS 310 Aviation Legislation (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: AWS 201 or AVT 201. Emphasizes legal concepts concerning aviation as related to aircraft and 
flight operations, early airmail legislation, contracts, insurance and liability, regulatory statutes, and case 
law. 

AWS 315 ATC Radar Procedures (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: AWS 232. Designed to introduce and to familiarize the student with procedures used in 
identifying, monitoring, vectoring and separating aircraft utilizing Airport Surveillance Radar (ASR) and 
Precision Approach Radar (PAR) systems. 

AWS 320 Air Transportation (3) F 

Prerequisite: AWS 201 or AVT 201. A survey of the historical development of the air transportation system, 
including the impact of legislation, problems encountered in commercial air transportation, future 
industry requirements, airline operations, aviation economics, and social implications. 

AWS 351 Aviation Labor Relations (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: AWS 320. An analysis of labor and management relationships and their often differing goals. 
Course content includes historical development, unions and collective bargaining, contracts, labor 
legislation, and the role of government. 



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AWS 390 Airline Management (3) F 

Prerequisite: AWS 320. The application of management principles to airline operations. Emphasis is on the 
characteristics of airline financing, marketing, scheduling, facilities planning, maintenance and 
governmental relations and regulations. 

AWS 395 Airport Management (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: AWS 320. A comprehensive study of airport operations and management including analysis 
of the role of the airport manager in planning, finance and administration, public relations, operations 
and facility maintenance. 

AWS 401 The National Airspace System (3) F 

Prerequisite: AWS 320An overview of the National Airspace System Plan. Course covers problems 
encountered in implementing the system, airspace allocation and usage, facilities, safety considerations, 
new developments in electronic navigation and control systems, economic impact, and social and political 
implications. 

AWS 410 Advanced Tower Operations (3) F 

This course will prepare each student to pass the Certified Tower Operator's examination. Basic Air 
Traffic Control procedures will be studied from the publications prepared for the National Air Traffic 
Training Program and other training material. 

AWS 412 En Route Operations (3) Sp 

This course will cover the theory and fundamentals of en route radar operations to include practical 
application. Basic Air Traffic Control procedures will be studied from the publications prepared for the 
National Air Traffic Training Program and other training material. 

AWS 415 Seminar in Aviation Science (3) F 

This course will provide a format for the aviation student to receive exposure to guest lectures, present 

special aviation topics and participate in group discussion on current topics in aviation. 

AWS 418 Crew Resources Management (CRM) (3) Sp 

This course will apply the theory and methods developed in the Aviation psychology course and will 
focus on the knowledge in a cockpit setting. The emphasis will be on the human-factors aspects of cockpit 
crew management and additional psychological concepts as they relate to cockpit management. 

AWS 420 Flight Safety (3) F 

Prerequisite: AWS 201. A presentation and analysis of factors and procedures relating to aviation safety. 
Includes techniques for accident prevention, development of safety programs, procedures used in 
accident investigation, the human factor (physiological and psychological), and the effect of weather on 
safety. 

AWS 425 Aircraft Accident Investigation (3) Sp 

Prerequisites: AWS 201 or AVT 201 and AWS 320. A course designed to acquaint the aviation student with 
procedures, techniques, and methods of determining causes of accidents. The roles of the various 
investigative bodies, and their responsibilities and obligations will be stressed. 



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AWS 430 Flight Physiology (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: AWS 201 or AVT 201. The course will focus on human factor considerations related to the 
aerospace environment, including both the psychological and physiological concerns. Special topics will 
include the cause, symptoms, prevention, and treatment of flight environment disorders. 

AWS 450 Senior Project in Aviation (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Chairperson. A review of all aviation course work completed by the student. 
The student will complete a major aviation research paper which must be presented before an audience of 
departmental and/or university faculty members. 

AWS 490 Independent Study in Aviation (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Upper-level Standing. This course provides academic credit to upper-level students for 
independent study, research, problems and special investigations, and/or special readings authorized by 
the Dean and supervised by a designated, consenting faculty member. Cannot be taken concurrently with 
Independent Study in Aviation (AWS 491). 

AWS 491 Advanced Independent Study in Aviation (6) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Upper-Level Standing This course provides academic credit to upper-level students for 
independent study, research, problems and special investigations, and/or special readings authorized by 
the Dean and supervised by a designated, consenting faculty member. Cannot be taken concurrently 
with Independent Study in Aviation (AWS 490). 

AWS 498 Cooperative Education in Aviation I (1-6) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Chairperson. Provides entry level aviation and/or transportation work 
experience with a federal, state, or local government agency, private business, or other agency. 

AWS 499 Cooperative Education in Aviation II (1-12) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Chairperson. Provides advanced aviation and/or transportation work 
experience with a federal, state, or local government agency, private business, or other agency. 

Biology 

BIO 101 Biological Science (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course is for non-science majors only. Fundamental concepts in biology are presented. Topics 
include structure and functions of cells, introductory genetics, reproduction, and physiology. Emphasis is 
on human organ systems. 

BIO 130 Principles of Biology (3) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: BIO 131. This course deals with basic biological principles and how they are interrelated, the 
scientific and biological study of living systems, arid the organizational structure of the living world at all 
levels of organization from the molecule to the biosphere. The principles of chemistry and biochemistry 
and the functional and operational properties of living matter are included. 

BIO 131 Principles of Biology Laboratory (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: BIO 130. This laboratory involves the study of the use of the compound microscope, 
examination of living cultures of protozoa and other organisms, microscopic examination of animal and 
plant cells, animal tissues, identification of biological molecules, enzyme action, fermentation, cellular 
respiration, photosynthesis, mitosis, and dissection of frogs. 

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BIO 132 Principles of Biology II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Pre-reqirisites: BIO 130 and BIO 131 with grade of "C" or better in both classes. This course is a continuation of 
BIO 130, with special emphasis on evolution, ecology, characterizations of fungi, protozoans, plants, and 
animals. 

BIO 133 Principles of Biology Laboratory II (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-reqnisite: BIO 132. This course is a continuation of BIO 131, and includes Medelian genetics, molecular 
biology, population genetics, bacteriology, plant diversity and physiology, animal diversity and 
physiology, animal development and ecology. 

BIO 204 General Zoology (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: BIO 130 and 131 and BIO 132 and BIO 133 for Biology majors. Co-requisite: BIO 205. Biology of 
invertebrates and vertebrates, including the structures of the body and its organization into special 
systems that carry on essential life processes. The more general phases of animal existence— reproduction, 
heredity, distribution, and evolution — are included, in addition to an introduction to classifying and 
naming animals. 

BIO 205 General Zoology Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: BIO 204. Study of the classification of living organisms, including all the invertebrate and 
vertebrate phyla. 

BIO 206 General Botany (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: BIO 130 and 131. An organic approach to plant biology is emphasized along with the 
structural and functional relationships of plant organs, with special attention given to physiological 
activities. Other aspects of the course are photosynthesis, fundamental concepts of biology, regulation, 
growth and development of seed plants, life cycles, reproduction and success in the plant kingdom, and 
dynamics of plant populations and ecology. 

BIO 207 General Botany Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: BIO 206. Morphological and anatomical study of seeds, roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and 
fruits. It includes field trips to local botanical gardens to study the local flora and their taxonomy. 

BIO 212 Human Anatomy (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: BIO 101, or BIO 130 and 131. Structure of various organs and systems in the human body. 

BIO 213 Human Anatomy Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: BIO 200. Anatomical study of the integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, 
nervous system, circulatory system, sensory system, lymphatic system, endocrine system, and the 
reproductive system. Students may be required to visit a local morgue to observe an autopsy. 

BIO 220 Comparative Anatomy (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: BIO 204 and 205. Co-requisite: BIO 221.. Basic patterns of vertebrate structure and 
development, and the functions of these structures in terms of adaptive significance. 

BIO 221 Comparative Anatomy Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: BIO 220. A comparative study of the anatomy of various vertebrates, such as the shark, perch, 
frog, lizard, pigeon, fetal pig, and cat. 

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BIO 300 Human Physiology (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: BIO 204 and 205. Co-requisite: BIO 301.. The basic principles and concepts of human 
physiology. Topics include cell physiology, the nerve-muscle unit, blood, body fluids and the kidneys, 
heart and circulation, respiration, endocrinology and reproduction, as well as digestion, energy, 
metabolism, and temperature control. 

BIO 301 Human Physiology Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: BIO 300. Study of the cardiovascular system, respiration and metabolism, blood, renal 
function and homeostasis, neural stimulation of muscle contraction, digestion of starch, egg albumen and 
fat by enzyme action, endocrine system and reproduction. 

BIO 302 Plant Physiology (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: BIO 206 and 207. Co-requisite: BIO 303.. Metabolism of plants; physical, chemical and 
environmental influences on plant metabolism; regulation and control of photosynthesis; structural and 
functional properties of metabolites; organization and operation of the principal metabolic activities; 
growth regulations and development of plants; tropisms; hormones; and a laboratory approach to the 
study of agricultural, horticultural, and floricultural methods. 

BIO 303 Plant Physiology Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: BIO 302. Physiology of seeds, seed germination, seed testing, photosynthesis, respiration, 
translocation, transpiration, plant growth and development, auxins and growth hormones. 

BIO 304 Embryology (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: BIO 204 and 205. Co-requisite: BIO 305.. Study of the development of amphibian, avian and 
mammalian embryos from gametogenesis through organogenesis. 

BIO 305 Embryology Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: BIO 304. Gametogenesis, maturation and fertilization in ascaris, sea urchin development, 
starfish development, early development of the frog, chick, and pig embryo. 

BIO 310 Genetics (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: BIO 204 and 205. Co-requisite: BIO 311. Study of the mechanisms of inheritance in organisms 
and populations, genes, DNA, chromosomes, mutations, genome, pedigrees, and genetic engineering. 

BIO 311 Genetics Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: BIO 310. The study of mitosis; meiosis; animals, human beings, and plant chromosomes, 
salivary gland chromosomes; preparation of human leucocyte chromosomes; karyotyping; genetic ratios; 
gene frequency; human genetic traits from phenotypes; and pedigree analysis. 

BIO 320 General Ecology (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: BIO 204 and 205 or permission of advisor. Co-requisite: BIO 321.. A general study of the 
interaction of individual organisms, populations, and communities with their environment. Particular 
emphasis is placed on the ecology of South Florida and the major ecological crises facing this area. 

BIO 321 General Ecology Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: BIO 320. The study of the distribution of plant and animal communities, habitants, 
ecosystems and the effects of man on environment. Field trips are included. 

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BIO 330 Parasitology (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: BIO 130 and 131. Co-requisite: BIO 331. An introduction to the morphology, classification, life 
history, pathology, and control of parasitic and symbiotic forms of life. 

BIO 331 Parasitology Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: BIO 330. The study of common human and animal parasites working with preserved and/or 
prepared specimens. 

BIO 400 Evolution (3) F, Sp, Su 

Evolutionary mechanisms and theories, sources of variation, adaptation, speciation, and macroevolution, 
origin of life, and humankind. 

BIO 410 Microbiology (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: BIO 204 - BIO 207, BIO 310, BIO 311, CHE 110 - CHE 113, and CHE 210 - CHE 213 for Biology 
majors only, not for the students enrolled in the dual-degree nursing program. Co-requisite: BIO 411. A detailed 
investigation of the prokaryotic cell; structural and functional characterization of the major groups; 
physiological activities of the role of bacteria in the environment, emphasizing agricultural, ecological 
and commercial usefulness; basic concepts of immunology, virology, and pathology; laboratory culture 
techniques and aseptic procedures; taxonomy and characterization of bacterial species; and 
environmental influence on growth and availability of species. 

BIO 411 Microbiology Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: BIO 410. Experiments and techniques in culture, growth, maintenance, and sterilization of 
microbes such as bacteria, algae, fungi, and viruses. 

BIO 420 Cell Biology (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: BIO 204 - BIO 207, BIO 310, BIO 311, CHE 110 - CHE 113, CHE 210 - CHE 213.. Except for 
Biology/Nursing students. Co-requisite: BIO 421. A study of the fine structure of eukaryotic and prokaryotic 
cells, the chemical composition and organization of cells, cell metabolism and bioenergetics, the 
ultrastructural and molecular organization and functions of each major cell organelle or structural 
component, and the molecular basis of the genetic code and gene expression. 

BIO 421 Cell Biology Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: BIO 420. Biochemical measurements of carbohydrates; lipids and proteins in plasma; thin 
layer chromatography of amino acids, amino acid sequencing; gel electrophoresis of blood proteins; 
measurements of enzyme activity; reactions of nucleic acids; DNA fingerprinting; mutations in yeast; 
transposon mutagenesis; tissue printing; and specimen preparation for light microscopy. 

BIO 430 Immunology (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: BIO 204, 205, 206 and 207 or permission of instructor. Co-requisite:. BIO 431.. A detailed 
investigation of the tissues, cells and biochemical components of the immune system, and the role of 
immune responses in the diagnosis and prevention of disease. 

BIO 431 Immunology Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: BIO 430. Agglutination reactions, precipitation and flocculation tests, enzyme immunoassays, 
common immunologic and serologic tests, pregnancy tests, antihuman globulin reaction (Coomb test). 



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BIO 440 Research I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. An introduction to the techniques of scientific investigation. Students, 
with the help of the instructor, will choose a problem in biology and design a procedure for investigation. 
The problem may not be original; the purpose is to help students broaden and integrate their 
backgrounds in the biological sciences. Students write reports on their investigation with well 
documented supporting evidence and present them to the instructor. Then they defend their 
investigation orally before colleagues, faculty, and visitors during the final week of the semester. 

BIO 441 Research II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: BIO 440 and Permission of instructor. Open to students who have successfully completed or 
want to continue with their investigation of the problem that they have chosen in BIO 440. 

BIO 460 Recombinant DNA (6) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: BIO 130, 132, and 133 All zoitli a grade of "C" or better, or permission, of instructor(s). This course 
is a combined lecture/laboratory course which will serve as a contemporary course on the basic 
principles, essential laboratory activities and relevant social issues and concerns prevalent in the current 
molecular biology revolution. 

NUT 200 Introduction to Nutrition (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: BIO 130 and BIO 131. This is a basic nutrition course designed to teach pre-nursing students 
and PE/health education majors basic concepts in nutrition and increase their awareness of dietary habits. 
The course will also enable the student to build a foundation of knowledge that may be used to evaluate 
nutritional information from varied sources. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the role of 
essential nutrients, their digestion, absorption and metabolism, food sources, and disease status incurred 
from deficiencies. 

Business Administration 

BUS 210 Applied Mathematics in Business (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: MAT 111. A representation of basic mathematical concepts, algebraic functions, and their 
applications in business practices. 

BUS 211 Principles of Management (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: First Semester Sophomore standing. An introductory management course dealing with the 
fundamental principles of management: planning, organizing, staffing, leading and controlling. The 
systems concept of management and the role of the manager in each level of the organization are 
emphasized. 

BUS 215 Quantitative Methods for Business & Economics (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: MAT 114. To integrate quantitative subjects with business decision making analysis. The 
following topics are covered: matrix algebra, the concept of derivatives and its rules, and optimization. 
Emphasis is on business application of the above stated concepts. 

BUS 240 Introduction to Hospitality Management (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. A survey course providing an overview of the hospitality industry: 

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its history, problems and general operating procedures. 

BUS 310 Business Mathematics (3) F, Su 

Prerequisite: MAT HI. This course explores mathematical problems involved in business merchandising, 
payrolls, calculation of simple and compound interest, discount rates, insurance, credit, and taxes. 

BUS 311 Business Law I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: BUS 211. This course involves the study of the legal environment of business, contracts, 
personal and real property, bailments, and agency. 

BUS 312 Business Law II (3) Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: BUS 311. A continuation of BUS 311 with emphasis on commercial paper, sales, 
partnerships, corporations, and government regulation of business. 

BUS 320 Business Statistics I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MAT 111. A review of mathematical procedures, probability, and sampling distributions as 
they are used in business. 

BUS 321 Business Statistics II (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: BUS 320. In addition to theoretical presentation, this course will cover computer-based 
practical application of regression theory, and linear application of the following topics: linear regression 
modeling and the principles of least squares, multicolinearity and auto correlation, multiple regression, 
and the analysis of variance. 

BUS 344 Business Organization and Management (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: BUS 211, Sophomore standing. The practice of managing individuals and groups in today's 
dynamic business environment. Emphasis is placed on skills needed for managerial success. Case studies 
and exercises are utilized. 

BUS 345 Business Communications & Technical Writing (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: junior standing. A study of the techniques and approaches in writing business technical 
documents, including business plans, reports, proposals, newsletters, resumes, brochures and annual 
reports. Emphasis is on organization, data gathering, writing style, content and the packaging of 
documents. 

BUS 353 Principles of Insurance (3) Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MAT 102, junior standing. A study of the basic principles of insurance and theory of risks. 
Emphasis is on the following coverage: fire, marine, health, accident, and casualty. 

BUS 355 Principles of Real Estate (3) F 

Prerequisite: BUS 311 and MAT 111, Junior standing. This course covers land economics, principles of real 
estate finance including the study of federal and state practices in mortgages, brokerage, building and 

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construction, marketing, appraisal, and real estate law. 

BUS 361 Leadership Applications F, Sp 

Prerequisite: BUS 211. An examination of contemporary leadership issues through application. Topics 
include leadership theories, leadership ethics and values, group dynamics, organizational behavior and 
the dynamics of power. Emphasis is placed on understanding leadership as a mind set and as a tool. 

BUS 371 Cooperative Education in Business (6) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean. Provides students with an opportunity to alternate periods of 
academic training with employment in business-related environment. The course intends to improve the 
student's practical experience while receiving financial compensation. Approval of the Dean/Department 
Chairman and the director of cooperative education is required. 

BUS 372 Cooperative Education in Business (12) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean. Provides students with an opportunity to alternate periods of 
academic training with employment in business-related environment. The course intends to improve 
students' practical experience while receiving financial compensation. Approval of the Dean/Department 
Chairman and the director of cooperative education is required. 

BUS 394 Business Ethics and Society (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. Introduces students to the general relationship between a business 
organization and the ethical, legal, political, social and international environments in which it operates. 
Business is examined as one of the nation's basic institutions which needs to be profitable while also 
fulfilling a social role. 

BUS 400 Entrepreneurship (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: BUS 211. The study of the general theories, principles, concepts, and practices of creating and 
launching a new business. This includes identifying opportunities, preparing a business plan, and 
locating sources of finance. 

BUS 403 Strategic Management (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisites: ACC 212, BUS 211, MAR 301, FIN 301. An advanced course designed to integrate a 
student's knowledge of management, marketing, finance and accounting in order to formulate, 
implement and evaluate business strategies. 

BUS 404 International Business (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: BUS 211. Introductory analysis of a multinational organization with emphasis given to 
international trade and investment, foreign exchange and financial markets, and the cultural and political 
interaction between a multinational corporation and the host societies. 



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BUS 420 Operations Research (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisites: BUS 215, BUS 320. An introductory course in operations research. Principles and 
application of influence charts and decision models for linear programming, networks, queuing, 
inventory and transportation. A working knowledge of a spreadsheet program is mandatory. 

BUS 450 Business Internship & Seminar (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: Senior standing or approval of the advisor. The course focuses on interviewing techniques, 
resume and cover letter writing skills, interpersonal skills, and career planning are emphasized. It also 
provides students with professional work experience and on-the-job training in the business sector. 

BUS 480 Managerial Psychology (3) F, Su 

Prerequisite: BUS 211. A survey of people-oriented aspects of management with emphasis on managerial 
and organizational theory which affects human engineering, psychology and labor relations. 

BUS 487 Seminar in Management F, Sp 

Prerequisite: Junior standing and approval of the advisor. This course examines consideration of current issues 
in management. Readings required from current management publications and other related periodicals. 

BUS 498 Senior Project in Business (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisites: BUS 403, Senior Standing. A "capstone" class in business which requires students to 
demonstrate competence in all areas of business by way strategic case analysis and computer simulation. 
It is preferred that students take this course their last semester and they will be required to make real 
world business decisions by utilizing all of the skills they have acquired throughout their program of 
study. 

BUS 499 Independent Study (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course provides independent study of specific areas with direction and supervision of business 
faculty. 

Chemistry 

CHE 100 Introduction to Chemistry (3) F, Sp, Su 

An introductory course for the investigation of chemical understanding that is designed for first-year 
students who are not ready to take the more rigorous and challenging CHE 110/112 series. Concepts of 
atoms, atomic structure, and molecules will be presented. The manner by which atoms interact, the 
writing of chemical equations, pH, the chemistry of water, and solutions, equilibrium, and biological as 
well as organic molecules will be introduced. 

CHE 101 Concepts of Radiochemistry (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course is intended to introduce students at all levels and from all disciplines on the many different 
aspects and applications of nuclear and radiation engineering/physics. Topics covered include: history of 
nuclear development, basic concepts of radiation and radioactivity, radioactive waste management, 
global warming and the impact of nuclear power plants, industrial applications, 

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health physics, nuclear medicine, job opportunities at power plants, graduate school, and national 
laboratories. 

CHE 110 General Chemistry I (4) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisites: MAT 111 and CHE 111.. This course is an introduction to basic principles of modern 
chemistry, including atomic structure, chemical formulas, chemical equations, bonding, stoichiometry, 
and properties of gases. 

CHE 111 General Chemistry I Laboratory (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: CHE 110. An introduction to basic chemical laboratory principles and techniques including 
physical properties, physical measurements, percent composition, empirical formulas, types of chemical 
reactions, molar calculations, and calorimetry. 

CHE 112 General Chemistry II (4) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CHE 110 Co-requisite: CHE 113. This course is a continuation of CHE 110, including kinetics, 
equilibria, oxidation- reduction, acid-base theory, periodicity, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. 

CHE 113 General Chemistry Laboratory II (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: CHE 112. A continuation of CHE 111, including experiments dealing with kinetics, acid/ base 
titration, and the qualitative analysis of metal ions. 

CHE 210 Organic Chemistry I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: CHE 112 and 113. Co-requisite: CHE 211. An introduction to the fundamentals of organic 
chemistry— the chemistry of carbon compounds. It covers chemical nomenclature, bonding, structure, 
reactivity, molecular properties, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, and synthesis. 

CHE 211 Organic Chemistry I Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: CHE 210. Applications of theory to techniques of identification, characterization, and 
reactions in chemical synthesis; purification, distillation, crystallization and evaporation, filtration, 
identification, characterization, melting and boiling point determination, spectroscopy and 
chromatography. 

CHE 212 Organic Chemistry II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CHE 210. Co-requisite: CHE 213. Organic synthesis reactions — Grignard, Friedel-Craft, Diels- 
Alder, Wittig, and Michael reactions; IR, NMR, UV-VIS, MS spectroscopy. 

CHE 213 Organic Chemistry II Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: CHE 272. Techniques of chemical synthesis and methods of following chemical reactions and 
validating synthetic processes. Reactions covered are Diels-Alder, Wittig, Grignard, Friedel-Craft, 
halogenation. 

CHE 214 Quantitative Analysis (3) F, Sp Su 

Prerequisite: CHE 112. Co-requisite: CHE 215. Fundamentals of classical quantitative analysis, including 
gravimetric, volumetric, acid-base, redox, compleximetric, potentiometric, and absorptiometric analyses. 

CHE 215 Quantitative Analysis Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-reqidsite: CHE 214 .Analytical laboratory techniques in quantitative analysis to include the principles of 
gravimetric, titrametric, and spectrophotometric analysis to quantitate material in a sample. 

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CHE 224 Environmental Chemistry (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: CHE110 and CHE 112 or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: CHE 225 Environmental 
chemistry is concerned principally with the chemical aspects of problems that human beings have created 
in the natural environment. The chemistry of ozone layer, ground-level air chemistry and air pollution, 
the greenhouse effect and global warming, toxic chemicals, energy production and its environmental 
consequences will be discussed. 

CHE 225 Environmental Chemistry Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: CHE 224. A study of the various pollutants and determination of their residues by physical 
and analytical methods. 

CHE 230 Introduction to Radiochemistry (3) F, Sp, Su 

This introductory radiochemistry course is designed for students majoring in chemistry/radiochemistry, 
physics and environmental sciences. This course is also recommended to engineering students who are 
transferring to chemical and biological engineering. Topics covered include radioactivity in nature; 
radioelement; physical properties of atomic nuclei and elementary particles; radioactive decay; decay 
modes nuclear radiation; measurement of nuclear radiation; and nuclear reactions. 

CHE 231 Introduction to Radiochemistry Laboratory I (1) F, Sp, Su 

The course covers experiments which include an oscilloscope tutorial; MCA (ScintiVision and 
GammaVision); nuclear pulse instrumentation; and pulse height analysis. Students will acquire a 
standard proficiency in laboratory skills in Radiochemistry. Each laboratory has a brief statement of the 
laboratory goals and discussion of what concepts will be specifically demonstrated or determined from 
the measurements. 

CHE 232 Introduction to Radiochemistry Laboratory II (2) F, Sp, Su 

Continuation of the introduction to the application of radiation and radiation protection instrumentation. 
Laboratory topics include personnel monitoring; radiation detection systems; gamma-ray spectroscopy; 
determination of environmental radiation; counting statistics; gamma and neutron shielding; and air 
sampling. 

CHE 250 Radioactive Waste Management (3) F, Sp, Su 

An introduction to radioactive waste management, including waste forms; regulation and sitting; public 
health and environmental issues; remediation and stabilization; low- and high-level waste management; 
air dispersion; and radioactive groundwater transport. 

CHE 340 Survey of Physical Chemistry (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: CHE110 and CHE 112 or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: CHE 341. An introduction to the 
main principles of physical chemistry including fundamentals of thermodynamics as applied to gases, 
liquids and solutions, chemical equilibria, chemical kinetics and atomic structure. 

CHE 341 Survey of Physical Chemistry Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: CHE 340. Representative experiments in physical chemistry designed to supplement CHE 340 
including thermochemistry, phase diagrams, colligative properties, electrochemistry and chemical 
kinetics. 



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CHE 350 Principles of Radiation Health (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course is designed for chemistry majors with an emphasis in radiochemistry. Health physics, or 
radiological health, as it is frequently called, is the area of environmental health engineering that deals 
with the protection of the individual and population groups against the harmful effects of ionizing and 
nonionizing radiation. 

CHE 351 Principles of Radiation Health Laboratory (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is designed for chemistry majors with an emphasis in radiochemistry. Health physics, or 
radiological health, as it is frequently called, is the area of environmental health engineering that deals 
with the protection of the individual and population groups against the harmful effects of ionizing and 
nonionizing radiation. Some of the concepts encountered will be further explored here through the use of 
experimentation. 

CHE 360 Physical Chemistry I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: CHE 110, CHE 112 and MAT 201. Co-requisite: CHE 361. A study of the kinetic theory of gases, 
enthalpy and entropy, phase diagrams, thermodynamics, colligative properties, chemical equilibrium and 
equilibrium electrochemistry. 

CHE 361 Physical Chemistry I Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: CHE 360. Laboratory experiments designed to supplement CHE 360. Experiments related to 
thermochemistry, thermodynamics, phase behavior, colligative properties and chemical equilibrium will 
be included. 

CHE 362 Physical Chemistry II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CHE 360 or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: CHE 363. A study of the introduction to 
quantum theory, atomic structure and atomic spectra, electronic transitions, rotational and vibrational 
spectra, magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, catalysis and molecular reaction dynamics. 

CHE 363 Physical Chemistry Lab II (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: CHE 362. Laboratory experiments designed to supplement CHE 362. Experiments related to 
spectroscopy, kinetics, colloids, electrochemistry, diffusion and thermochemistry are performed. 

CHE 370 Advanced Radiochemistry/Nuclear Chemistry (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course provides a concise and complete description of the current knowledge and theories of 
radiochemistry and nuclear chemistry, as it applies to the various areas of science as a total discipline. The 
course will provide unassailable information about radioactive matter and its chemical/nuclear 
properties. Theoretical aspects of both radiochemistry and nuclear chemistry will be presented. 
Applications discussed include the use of radiochemicals in geochemistry, various dating methods, and 
the use of radiotracers in chemical research, and the environment as pertains to the geosphere and 
biosphere, among other pertinent topics. 

CHE 371 Advanced Radiochemistry/Nuclear Chemistry Laboratory (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course provides a concise application of theory in the co-requisite course, Advanced Radiochemistry 
(CHE 370). The laboratories include determination of fission activity in radio elements, such as Uranium; 
the calculation of activity of various isotopes; and the determination of secular equilibrium using the m Sn 
isotope. 



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CHE 380 Immunochemistry (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: CHE 112 and CHE 210 or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: CHE 381. A study of the 
developments in immunochemistry, humoral and cell-mediated immunity, general types and other 
aspects of immunity, antibody-antigen binding, antibody-antigen reactions, antibody-hapten equilibrium 
expressions and Scatchard plot, intrinsic and multivalent binding, lattice theory, cross reactivity, double- 
diffusion ("Ouchterlony") method, Immunoelectrophoresis, radial immunodiffusion, radioimmunoassay 
and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). 

CHE 381 Immunochemistry Lab (1) , Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: CHE 380 or permission of instructor. A study of the basic techniques in immunochemistry, 
agglutination methods, precipitation reactions, double immunodiffusion, radial immunodiffusion (RID), 
enzyme immunoassay (EIA), and electrophoresis techniques. 

CHE 410 Instrumental Analysis (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: CHE 214, CHE 360, CHE 362 and PHY 252 or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: CHE 411. A 
study of Instrumental methods of chemical analysis including modern spectrometric methods: nuclear 
magnetic resonance, infrared, visible, ultraviolet and mass spectroscopy; chromatographic methods: gas- 
liquid and high-performance liquid chromatography. 

CHE 411 Instrumental Analysis Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: CHE 410. Modern methods of quantitative analysis including nuclear magnetic resonance 
(NMR) spectrometer, mass spectrometer, UV-VIS spectrophotometer, GC and high-performance liquid 
chromatography (HPLC). 

CHE 430 Biochemistry (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: CHE 212 and 213. Co-requisite: CHE 331. Chemistry of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic 
acids, vitamins; intermediary metabolism; biosynthesis of biomacromolecules; properties of enzymes, and 
molecular genetics. 

CHE 431 Biochemistry Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: CHE 330. Application of the principles of spectrophotometry, enzyme kinetics, 

chromatographic separation of materials, electrophoresis, centrifugation, and isolation of biological 
products. 

CHE 460 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: CHE 214, CHE 360 and CHE 362 or permission of instructor. Co-requisite:CHE 461. A study of 
atomic structure, molecular shape and symmetry, bonding and structure of inorganic compounds, 
solution chemistry, ligand field theory, organometallic compounds and advanced topics on reaction 
mechanisms of d-block complexes and photochemical reactions. 

CHE 461 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: CHE 460. Ligand substitution reaction, rate laws, substitution in square-planar complexes, 
and substitution in octahedral complexes; synthesis of inorganic compounds and determination of their 
physical and chemical properties. 



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CHE 480 Special Topics in Nuclear and Radiochemistry (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course provides students with a broad and general use of radio chemicals in physics, chemistry, and 
biology. It will introduce students to the latest research projects in which radionuclides are used and their 
practical applications. 

NSC 453 Senior Project (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and majoring in chemistry or permission of instructor. The student works on a 
research project under the direction of a member of the chemistry faculty. 

Chinese 

CHI 201 Elementary Chinese I (3) F, Sp, Su 

This is a beginning course in Mandarin Chinese developing listening, speaking, reading and writing skills 
in modern standard Chinese. NOT OPEN to native or near-native speakers of Chinese. 

CHI 202 Elementary Chinese II (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of Elementary Chinese I. It features improvement of listening and speaking 
skills and further development of reading and writing skills. 

Communication 

COM 103 Introduction to Public Speaking (3) F, Sp, Su 

An introduction to effective communication in speaker-audience situations. Students learn basic 
techniques of researching, organizing and presenting their own, original ideas to an audience. There is 
additional emphasis on developing effective listening skills and ethical communication strategies for use 
in a democratic society. 

COM 203 Newswriting & Reporting (3) F 

Prerequisite: COM 301. This course focuses on the principles and practices of gathering, writing, and 
editing news and feature material for dissemination in mass media. It introduces students to reporting 
and writing skills fundamental to journalism and related fields. 

COM 205 Public Relations Writing (3) F 

Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing. This course will include instruction and writing practice designed to 
develop the professional level writing skills expected of public relations practitioners, with emphasis on 
news releases, media alerts, captions, PSAs, fact sheets, backgrounders, and pitch letters. 

COM 294 Writing for the Electronic Media (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: COM 203. Introduction to writing for radio and television with emphasis on news, features, 
and script preparation. 

COM 295 Television News Reporting (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 203, 294. This course introduces students to beat reporting. They will write and produce 
stories. 

COM 301 Survey of Mass Communication (3) F 

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing. The student will gain understanding of and insight into the mass media. 

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COM 304/SSC 304 Cultures & Film (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course will view independently and commercially made films. The analytical perspective is socio- 
cultural. A study of the cultural aesthetic, the political economy, the history and ideas of social living 
through films and selected readings, focusing on African, Latin American, Asian and Francophone film. 

COM 306 Business and Professional Speaking (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: COM 103. Preparation and presentation of longer speeches based upon the purposes and 
occasions of speaking. Emphasis is on techniques of persuasion and careful construction of speeches 
based upon analysis of actual audiences. 

COM 307 Argumentation and Debate (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: COM 103. In this course students will gain experience identifying foundations of arguments, 
creating sound arguments and refuting arguments. The class will also give students an opportunity to 
practice these skills in both oral and written form. 

COM 308 Voice and Diction (3) Sp 

Developing effective articulation, focusing on pronunciation, intonation, rhythm and phrasing and on 
vocal anatomy and fundamentals of the science of sound. 

COM 309 Fund Rad/TV Prod (3) Sp 

This course introduces students to the history, regulation, and contemporary practice of radio and 
television. It emphasizes basic planning, production, and presentation of television and radio program 
materials. 

COM 314 Principles of Public Relations (3) F 

Prerequisites: Junior Standing. This course will help students understand the process of public relations 
practice by studying its historical background and modern functioning. The case study approach will be 
used to evaluate campaign successes and failures. 

COM 317 Publications Design (3) Sp 

Prerequisites: Junior Standing. A lecture and laboratory course teaching techniques of design, layout, and 
production of publication materials, such as brochures, newsletters, in-house magazines, using the 
computer. 

COM 318 Case Studies in Public Relations (3) Sp 

Prerequisites: COM 203, 204, 301. Case studies and typical public relations problems in industry, labor, 
education, government, social welfare and trade associations. 

COM 319 International Mass Communication (3) F 

Prerequisites: COM 203, 301. This course is designed to help students gain an understanding of world mass 
media— their composition, their operation, their impact on populations — and policies used by countries 
to develop or regulate them. 

COM 323 Organizational Communication (3) Sp 

Prerequisites: Junior Standing. This course is an introduction to theory and research in organizational 
communication with emphasis on the systems, cultural and critical perspectives. 

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COM 325 Public Opinion & Propaganda (3) F 

Prerequisites: COM 203, 301. This course examines the nature of public opinion and propaganda from both 
a historical and contemporary perspective, focusing on persuasive communication techniques and 
economic, cultural, social and political considerations impacting mass media in human affairs and 
society. 

COM 328 TV Newscasting (3) 

Prerequisites: COM 294, 295, 301. This course introduces students to the basics of television announcing 
and interviewing. Emphasis is on audio and video tape preparation as well as voice presentation. 

COM 329 TEIevsion Production (3) 

Prerequisites: COM 203, 294, 295, 301. This course introduces students to the principles of video 
technology and production protocol, including studio camera operation, control room equipment and 
studio programming. 

COM 334 Persuasive Communication (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: COM 103 In this course students will discover basic theories and practices of persuasion. 
Students will learn how persuasion occurs in a variety of life experiences, including public, professional 
and personal contexts. 

COM 344 Diversity in Mass Communication (3) Sp 

Prerequisites: COM 203, 301. This course addresses the following: (1) how minorities are portrayed in the 
mainstream media; (2) how and to what extent they participate in the mainstream media, particularly as 
actors, producers, reporters, and writers; and (3) what media are owned by minorities and how such 
media fill the gap left by mainstream media. 

COM 400 Advanced Public Speaking (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course provides students with an opportunity to develop specialized speaking skills for specific 
occasions. Special attention is given to developing research and critical thinking skills best suited to 
construct sound arguments. 

COM 406 TV Practicum (3) Sp 

Prerequisites: COM 203, 294, 295, 301. This course introduces students to all facets of the news program, 
including story assignment, research, shooting, editing, operating cameras, stand-ups and managing live 
productions. 

COM 422 Communication Research (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: COM 203, 301: This course will introduce students to the foundations of research in the 
communication field, including quantitative and qualitative methods. The focus is on understanding the 
process of research design, conducting research projects, collecting data, and writing the report. 

COM 423 Public Relations Campaigns (3) F 

Prerequisites: COM 205, 314, 318. The course will help students understand the process of public relations 
practice by emphasizing the techniques of the campaign. The course will study the operation of public 
relations from an integrated Marketing Communications (IMC) perspective. 



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COM 430 Special Topics in Mass Media (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: COM 203, 301. An in-depth examination of different areas of mass media from social, 
cultural, political, and economic perspectives. 

COM 442 Media Law & Ethics (3) F 

Prerequisites: COM 203, 301. An exposition of the principles of mass communication law and ethics, 
focusing on constitutional guarantees. 

COM 494 Communication Internship (3-6) F 

Prerequisites: COM 203, 205/294, 295, 301, 317, 329. A program of internship in which Communication 
majors acquire on-the-job experience under the joint supervision of an employer and the 
Dean/Department Chairman. May be repeated. 

COM 495 Senior Project (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: COM 203, 205/294, 295, 301, 329, 334, 422, 442. A program-culminating activity in 
communication researched, written or presented and/or submitted for publication. 

Computer Sciences and Management Information Systems 

CSC 101 Introduction to Computers (3) F, Sp, Su 

An introductory course designed to acquaint students with the Internet, technology and popular business 
applications. Students will be working with WebCt, Microsoft Word, Excel Access and Powerpoint. 

CSC 220 Microcomputer Applications (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite CSC 101. This is a practical course, a continuation of CSC101, with emphasis on the solution of 
business problems using application software. This course will include advanced word processing, 
spreadsheet analysis and database management, and presentation. 

CSC 232 Principles of Programming (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite CSC 101. Algorithm development, computer program design, structured programming 
utilization, and flow charts are covered. This course also includes introductory programming in C++. 

CSC 250 Visual Basic ( 3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite CSC 232. An introductory course using an object oriented language for business 
programming. Students develop several business applications and are given an opportunity to expand 
their knowledge by further developing their own project at the end of the semester. 

CSC 333 System Analysis and Design ( 3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite CSC 232. Uses analysis and review of existing systems to explain the structured systems 
analysis and design process. Working with the system's life cycles, topics include flow diagrams, 
cost/benefit analysis, interviewing and documentation. Students are required to solve case studies and 
develop a documentation portfolio. 

CSC 335 Data Structures ( 3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CSC 232. This course studies the basic concepts of data structures and associated algorithms. 
The course covers arrays, simple sorting algorithms, stacks and queues, linked lists, recursion, advanced 
sorting, binary tres, red-black trees, 2-3-4 trees and external storage, hash tables, heaps graphs, and 
weighted graphs. The relative advantages and disadvantages of data structure and its use are discussed. 

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CSC 341 Computer Organization (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CSC 232. This course introduces computer hardware and system software concepts. The 
objective is to provide technical knowledge and skills on computer resource management, systems 
design, and systems implementation. Materials on systems architecture, data storage technology, systems 
integration and performance, input/output technology, data and network communication, computer 
networks, application development, operating systems, file management, internet and distributed 
applications, and system administration are presented in this course. 

CSC 345 Web Technology (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite CSC 232. A project orientation approach designed to acquaint students with the use of 
integrating the World Wide Web to solve practical problems. Students will develop a dynamic web site 
with current software development tools. 

CSC 350 Special Problems (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CSC 232. Students are directed to perform projects or do individual readings in specific areas 
of computer science or management information systems. 

CSC 360 Computer Operating Systems (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CSC 232. Introduces the students to operating systems and systems programming. Topics 
include design, implementation, and maintenance techniques, multi-level memory management and 
resource allocation, scheduling supervisors, loaders, I/O control systems, multi-programming, file and 
systems protection. 

CSC 365 Distributed Systems (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CSC 232. This course focuses on protocols and methods for assigning jobs to more than one 
processor. Emphasis is on array processing, parallel processing, multiprocessing, multiprogramming, 
reliability, protection, and communication among cooperating processes. 

CSC 373 C++ Programming (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CSC 232. Introduction to object-oriented programming languages with an emphasis on 
programming styles and algorithm development. Students will learn methodology for program 
development. Topics include primitive types, control structures, strings arrays, classes and objects, data 
abstraction inheritance polymorphism. 

CSC 374 Java Programming (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CSC 232. Java is currently the language of choice for building applications on the web. 
Beginning programmers learn this object-oriented, platform-independent language in order to obtain 
marketable general-purpose programming skills. 

CSC375 Network and Data Communications (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CSC232. This course covers the basic concepts of network and data communications. The 
course covers sections on network design essentials, media, interface cards, communications and 
protocols, architectures, administration and support, types of networks, troubleshooting network 
problems, and internet resources. 

CSC 385 Artificial Intelligence (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CSC 232. This course discusses various areas of artificial intelligence including knowledge 
representation, learning vision, expert systems, robotics and natural languages. Artificial Intelligence 
programming languages and their techniques and control structures are also presented. 

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CSC 395 Software Engineering Principles (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CSC 232. This course uncovers the process of software engineering from beginning concepts, 
to design, testing, maintenance and retirement. Issues concerning integration, software quality, security, 
fault tolerance, human factors, operation, product feasibility and organizational structures are discussed. 

CSC 405 Programming Languages (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CSC 232. This course studies the basic concepts of programming languages. Students will 
gain a broad comprehension of many diverse programming languages, along with confidence and 
understanding, allowing the students to adopt new languages as they become available in the future. 

CSC 413 e-Commerce (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites/ 'Co-requisites CSC 345 and MAR 301. This course introduces students to both the theory and 
practice of conducting business over the Internet and world wide web. It introduces business strategies, 
technologies and how they are integrated into a business model. 

CSC 420 Independent Study (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing with instructor approval. This course provides students with independent 
reading and/or research with the direction and supervision given by computer science and information 
systems' faculty. 

CSC 441 Honors Research (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: Senior Standing and permission of the Chairperson. Intended for honor students and involves 
research in Computer Science. Students will develop their own hypotheses and test them through a series 
of well-planned experiments. During the last semester of the senior year, each student will present his/her 
report in scientific format and defend it at a session before the University Honors Committee and 
members of the School/Department. 

CSC 445 Management Information Systems (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CSC 232. Study of life cycle and prototyping methodologies used to develop, implement, and 
maintain computer-based information systems. Discusses transaction processing, management 
information and decision-support systems. Can include case studies and team presentation. 

CSC 460 Senior Proj ect (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite Senior Standing. The intent of this course is to provide senior-level computer science and 
management information systems majors an opportunity to undertake valuable research in areas of 
computer and information technology. 

CSC 475 Computer Algorithm (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CSC 473 or CSC 474. This course is a study of algorithm design, algorithm complexity 
analysis, and problem complexity analysis. Types of problems addressed will include dynamic 
programming, searching and sorting, divide & conquer, backtracking, branch-and-bound. 

CSC 483 Database Concepts and Design (3) F, Sp 

Prereqidsite CSC 333 or CSC 395. The study focuses on the theoretical design and management of database 
systems conceptual data models, implementation models, data dictionary and policy formulation. The 
study will also uncover structures relating to databases, design methodology, normalization, integrity 
constraints, distributed databases, data warehouse, and relational algebra. 

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CSC 485 Simulation & Management Application I (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing. A study of program packages leading to solutions of management problems. 
Advanced techniques in solving problems will be discussed and preparing for IT Certification. 

CSC 486Simulation & Management Application II (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: CSC 4S5. A continuation of CSC 485. The course includes advanced techniques for applying 
the computer in solving complex problems and preparing for IT certification. 

CSC 487 Database Programming (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CSC 483. The study teaches logical design approach and implementation of databases to 
derive the physical design. Developing and querying databases using a database package and structured 
query language SQL will be emphasized. Function of Database Management Systems, SQL data 
definition language, data manipulation language, database objects and other database tools will be 
discussed and used to resolve database problems ranging from the simple to the most complicated. Data 
administration issues will also be addressed. 

CSC 490 Computer Ethics & Society (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing. This course deals with the ethical and social issues arising from the 
development and deployment of computers in society. The course also provides fundamental information 
about computer and technology ethics, as well as the details the ramifications of continuing technological 
developments with regard to privacy, security, piracy, access to computing technology for person with 
disabilities and other important philosophical and ethical issues. 

CSC 494 Software Project Development (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CSC 333 or CSC 395. Detailed techniques for designing and developing software for large 
programs will be addressed. Design strategies, methodologies, and various paradigms are taught. 
Architectural models, development tools and environments, implementation guidelines, and 
documentation will be included. 

CSC 498 Cooperative Education in Computer Science I (1-6) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Chairperson. Provides entry level work experience in the areas of analyzing, 
designing, implementing, and testing computer hardware and software. This course also includes 
managing information systems, and processing data for federal, state, or local governments, private 
enterprises or other agencies. 

CSC 499 Cooperative Education in Computer Science II (1-12) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Chairperson. Provides advanced work experience in analyzing, designing, 
implementing, and testing computer hardware and software. This course also includes managing 
information systems, and processing data for federal, state, or local governments, private enterprises, or 
other agencies. 

Criminal Justice 

CRJ 200 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (3) F, Su 

Presents a relatively broad view of the entire criminal justice process: agencies, courts, police, correction 
prisons, jails, probation, and parole; providing historical and philosophical foundations of the system, 
developing a knowledge of terms, practices, and procedures, and emphasizing contemporary problems 
within the system. 

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CRJ 301 Criminal Law I (3) F, Su 

Prerequisite: CRJ 200. Designed to provide knowledge of the elements of proof necessary for prosecution 
of the various substantive crimes, viewing both that of the common law and statutory modifications; trial 
and appellate procedure, rules of evidence, codes of criminal procedure and current trends and problems 
within the judiciary system. 

CRJ 302 Criminal Law II (3) Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CRJ 200. A continuation of Criminal Law I, this course places emphasis on constitutional 
foundations and restraints on the exercise of government power. The case study method is used, 
emphasizing decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court in areas of basic rights and liberties pertinent to arrest 
and restraint, right to counsel, search and seizure, freedom of speech, due process, the judiciary in 
involvement of the rule of law, and protection of individual rights in a democracy. 

CRJ 303 Probation and Parole System (3) F, Su 

Prerequisite: CRJ 200. Examines the community-based treatment aspect of the corrections system. 
Probation and parole philosophy and development, pre-sentence investigation, supervision and methods 
are reviewed. 

CRJ 304 Causes and Prevention of Delinquency and Crime (3) Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CRJ 200. Provides a wide scope of knowledge in the application of social theory and research 
of the problems of delinquency and crime. Emphasis is placed on means and methods of treatment of the 
individual as a means of preventing criminal careers and recidivism. Institutions and agencies theory and 
practice are explored. 

CRJ 305 Confinement Facilities (3) F, Su 

Prerequisite: CRJ 200. A critical analysis of the origin and development of jails, prisons and correctional 
facilities. Institutional procedures, physical plants, custody and control, administration and management 
procedures, inmate treatment, and preparation for return to the community are studied. 

CRJ 306 Correctional Philosophy and Services (3) F, Su 

Prerequisite: CRJ 200. Emphasizes community treatment programs as alternatives to institutionalization, 
the use of volunteers and para-professionals, release and furlough programs. This course also examines 
community resources that affect the criminal justice system. 

CRJ 307 Criminology (3) Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CRJ 200, MAT 111, BIO 130, BIO 131, CHE 110, CHE 111. An examination of the field of 
criminology, including related theories, basic assumptions, definitions and concepts 

CRJ 400 Selected Topics in Criminal Justice (3) Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CRJ 200. Topics may include: methods of correctional treatment, criminal investigation, 
government and industrial security, selected law topics, and police-community relations. 

CRJ 403 Police Administration (3) F Sp 

Prerequisite: CRJ 200. A study of the principles of organization, administration, and functioning of police 
departments to include inspection and control, personnel training, and operations. Emphasis is also 
placed on operational services, records, communication and custody. 

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CRJ 405 Law Enforcement (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: CRJ 200. A study of both procedural and substantive state statutes and state traffic laws. 
Legal guidelines for police officers are included. 

CRJ 406 Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice (3) Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: 12 credits in Criminal Justice. Provide opportunities for advanced discussion and projects 
focusing on current issues and problems in the criminal justice system. 

CRJ 407 Constitutional Law I (3) F, Su 

Prerequisite: CRJ 200. An exploration of pre-constitutional development philosophy and forms of 
constitutions, interpretation and constructions, the amendment of constitutions, the federal system, 
distribution of sovereign powers, power of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of 
government, constitutional limitations, guarantees and the impact of the constitution upon the criminal 
justice system. 

CRJ 408 Constitutional Law II (3) Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CRJ 200 and POL 301. A continuation of Constitutional Law I, this course additionally 
explores civil rights and liberties. 

CRJ 409 Criminal Evidence and Court Procedure (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: CRJ 200. An examination of rules governing the admissibility of evidence, specifically as they 
affect the law enforcement officer in the process of arrest, use of force, search, seizure, preservation, 
custody, testimony and courtroom procedures. 

CRJ 410 Private and Public Security (3) F, Su 

Prerequisite: CRJ 200. This course examines the field of private and public security systems including, the 
protection of life, property, and the maintenance of social order. 

CRJ 411 Drugs, Alcohol, and Crime (3) Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CRJ 200. This course examines history, pharmacology, health consequences and the criminal 
aspects of mind-altering drugs. Emphasis is on placed on the effects of substances on criminal behavior, 
the legal response to the problem, and on the treatment and prevention of drug abuse. 

CRJ 412 Criminal Investigation (3) F, Su 

Prerequisite: CRJ 200. This course examines aspects of criminal investigations: its function, history, current 
obligation, and future prospects. 

CRJ 421 Field Placement I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Senior standing (90 credits). Learning through supervised work experience in a selected 
criminal justice department or agency. Supervision of the learning experience is provided by the agency 
arid the faculty placement director. Registration and planning with the placement director must be 
completed one semester prior to placement. 

CRJ 422 Field Placement II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: CRJ 421. This course, a continuation of Field Placement I, involves learning through 
supervised work experience in a criminal justice agency. Supervision of the learning experience is 
provided by the field placement director. 



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Dance 

DAN 181 Dance Ensemble I (1) F 

Practical experience in dance production, including design, tryouts, choreography and public 
performance, under faculty supervision. 

DAN 182 Dance Ensemble II (1) Sp 

Continuation of DAN 181. 
Drama 

DRA 200 Drama Appreciation (3) Sp 

Drama and theatre from a literary perspective, beginning with early ritual to contemporary theatre, 
including influences by Africans and African Americans. 

Economics 

ECO 201 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MAT 110 OR MAT 111. A study of the aggregate level of national income and output as it 
affects economic growth and stability, inflation, unemployment. 

ECO 202 Principles of Microeconomics (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MAT 111 OR MAT 112. A study of U.S. market systems emphasizing concepts of supply and 
demand, competition, pricing, resource allocation as applied to issues in business, labor, and public 
policy. 

ECO 371 Money & Capital Markets (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: ECO 201, ECO 202. Analytical framework to provide the necessary tools to understand the 
U.S. financial system and its operation. Topics include: financial markets, money management of 
financial institutions, the Federal Reserve System, monetary policy, and international financial system. 

ECO 420 International Economics and Trade (3) Sp 

Prerequisites: ECO 201 and ECO 202. A broad view of international trade with emphasis on the theories of 
international trade, balance of payments, commercial policy, international specialization, foreign 
exchange markets, and government intervention. 

ECO 485 Environmental Economics (3) F 

Prerequisite: ECO 210 arid ECO 202. A study of the relations among resource allocations, environmental 
concerns, and economic institutions and policy. Emphasis is on alternative strategies in solving the 
problems of environmental quality and resource scarcity. 



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Education 

EDU 201 Social Foundations of Education (3) F, Sp, Su 

Teacher Certification Program only. This course provides a clear understanding of the teaching profession 
and the issues and controversies confronting American education today. It provides a comprehensive 
body of information on the various foundations of education and significant contemporary educational 
issues from a broad, substantive and interdisciplinary viewpoint. 

EDU 202 Psychological Foundation of Education (3) F, Sp, Su 

Teacher Certification Program only. The major contributions from psychology for educational practice are 
outlined. 

EDU 203 Sociological and Psychological Foundations of Education F, Sp, Su 

All education majors. This course is an introduction to social and psychological aspects of education. The 
social component includes the historical, philosophical and social aspects of education. The psychological 
component focuses on the nature of human growth and behavior and the teaching-learning process in the 
classroom. 

EDU 204 Teaching in Elementary Schools (3) F, Sp, Su 

Teacher Certification course and Elementary majors in Education. Emphasis will be placed on service to the 
elementary school community, while inspiring, motivating, and encouraging students to build a strong 
image about themselves and their educational needs. The teaching methodologies related to content 
specific areas will be studied. 

EDU 205 Multicultural Diversity (3) F, Sp, Su 

Required for all majors in Education and Teacher Certification. This course is designed to support and extend 
the current concepts of culture, cultural pluralism and equity into the formal school setting. It examines 
the historical and theoretical precepts of these concepts, and considers the use of students' cultural 
backgrounds to develop effective classroom instruction and school environments. 

EDU 206 Teaching in Middle and Secondary Schools (3) F, Sp, Su 

Teacher Certification Course and required for Secondan/ majors and ESE majors. Methods, materials, and 
procedures for teaching in the middle secondary school with emphasis on work units, lesson plans, 
nature of the pupil, learning activities, evaluation, reports, and classroom management techniques that 
focus on current trends and utilization of appropriate technology. 

EDU 301 Language Arts for Elementary Schools (3) F, Sp, Su 

Teacher Certification Course. This course considers principles of current scientific study of language 
experience in a child's life and the nature of development of needs, interests, and abilities in the basic 
communication skills. The course emphasizes planning and guidance of curricular activities and 
development of language experiences through print media texts and non-print media which includes 

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technology. For students in grades K -6. The needs of special students are also addressed. This course is 
based on State and National Standards. 

EDU 302 Science in Elementary School (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: BIO 101, PSC 101, ENV 101. This course is designed to provide techniques of instruction and 
methods of instruction in the delivery of an elementary science curriculum. Topics will include 
educational philosophies, how children learn science, learning activities, thinking skills, science resources, 
assessment and subject matter in the major science content areas. For students in grade K- 6. The needs of 
special students are also addressed. The course is based on State and National Standards. 

EDU 303 Music for Elementary Schools (3) F, Sp, Su 

All elementary education majors and Teacher Certification. This course is designed to provide background 
knowledge in music for elementary classroom teachers to use in helping students understand basic 
fundamentals in music to assist students in understanding other subjects. Students will be involved in 
activities that are designed to motivate and make them more comfortable using music in the classroom. 
For students in grade K-6. The needs of special students are also addressed. The course is based on State 
and National Standards. 

EDU 304 Teaching Social Studies for Elementary Schools (3) F, Sp, Su 

All Elementary Education, Exceptional Education majors and Teacher Certification. This course is designed to 
provide a knowledge base, instructional methods, and motivational techniques that will enable pre- 
teachers to help young people develop tools for effective living. Computers will be integrated into the 
learning process. For students in grade K-6. The needs of special students are also addressed. The course 
is based on State and National Standards. 

EDU 305 Teaching Art in Elementary Schools (3) F, Sp, Su 

All Elementary Education majors and Teacher Certification. This course is designed to investigate and explore 
activities associated with, and integral to, the daily operations of an elementary school visual arts 
program. The course will focus upon the procedures applications and practices involved in creating, and 
producing the creative product for students in grade K-6. The needs of special students are also 
addressed. The course is based on State and National Standards. 

EDU 307 Teaching Mathematics in Elementary Schools (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Math 105 and Math 106 with a "C" or higher. All Elementary Education, 
Exceptional Education majors and Teacher Certification. The course is designed to provide the most current 
and useable information in Mathematics useful for elementary teachers. It also integrates great ideas and 
pedagogy in teaching mathematics for students in grades K-6. The needs of special students are also 
addressed. The course is based on State and National Standards. 



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EDU 308 Teaching Reading in the Elementary Schools (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 102, REA 101 with a "C" or higher. All Elementan/ Education, 
Exceptional Education and Middle Grades and Secondary English Education majors. Involves the reading 
process as it relates to principles of learning, child development, and self-image. The course considers 
current views of how young children become literate, how to help children become involved and 
interested in their own learning, and how to help children use reading and writing for authentic purposes 
for students in grades K-6. Selected ESOL competencies are also infused. The course is based on State and 
National Standards. 

EDU 309 Children's Literature (3) F, Sp, Su 

Teacher certification course only. An overview of literary materials for children. The elementary school 
student teacher evaluates and select literature based on developmental appropriateness, develop a sound 
methodology for using books to enrich children's lives, and becomes familiar with these literacy 
materials. 

EDU 313, 314, 315 Pre-Student Teaching Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

Required for all Education majors. Prerequisites: Successful completion of EDU 204 or 206 and EDU 203. Pre- 
Student Teaching is a field experience for majors in education who are preparing for the status of 
internship. Students must observe the quality of classroom management techniques and participate in 
classroom activities. These experiences help to build self-confidence, eliminate shyness and stage fright, 
and provide an opportunity to test the decision to become a teacher. 

EDU 324 Teaching Health and Physical Education in the Elem. Schools (3) F, Sp, Su 

Teacher Certification Course and required course for Elementan/ majors. Prerequisite: physical education 
requirement. This course is designed to aquaint the students with methods, procedures, techniques, and 
devices for teaching health and physical education in elementary schools. It uses a developmental 
approach and stresses exploratory methods of teaching young children. For students in grades K-6. The 
needs of special student are also addressed. The course is based on State and National Standards. 

EDU 331 Instructional Technology (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: Successfd completion of all EDU 200 level courses. All Education majors except Music Education. 
This course is designed to teach students to incorporate media and technologies for learning in their 
repertoire, to use them as teaching tools, and to guide students in using them as learning tools in 
elementary and secondary schools. 

EDU 403 Teaching Reading in the Middle and Secondary Schools (3) F, Sp, Su 

A study of the reading process as it relates to secondary reading in the content area. Exposure to reading 
inventories, diagnostic tests, materials and techniques of developmental and corrective reading; 
application of these skills 

through working with children at the secondary level in the public schools during pre-student teaching 
includes the systems approach. 

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EDU 408 Classroom Behavioral Management (3) F, Sp, Su 

Required for all Education majors except Exceptional Education majors . Must be taken on the main campus. 
Prerequisites: Successful completion of EDU 205 and all 300 level EDU courses. This course draws upon 
sociologists' perspective of schools as a social organization with an emphasis on the characteristics of the 
classroom as a social unit, the leadership functions of the teacher, and the impact of the teacher's 
leadership decisions on the classroom organization and its membership. It attends to classroom 
management practices, the principles of field psychology, behavioristic and humanistic psychology. It 
also covers transactional analysis, teacher effectiveness training, psychodrama, socio-drama, and 
technological management. 

EDU 411 Diagnosis and Remediation F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite EDU 308. Required for English Elementary Education and Exceptional Education majors. Current 
views on sequential development skills and concepts of reading, recognition and diagnosis of reading 
problems, and prescription and utilization of appropriate methods and materials to increase reading 
performance. Selected ESOL competencies are also included. 

EDU 412 Teaching Methods in Physical and Health Education (K-12) (3) F 

Prerequisite PED 401, 407, 409. Teacher Certification Course and Physical Education majors. A broad coverage 
of the duties of physical education personnel, designed to acquaint the student with methods, 
procedures, techniques, and devices for teaching health and physical education in grades K-12. The needs 
of special student are also addressed. The course is based on State and National Standards. 

EDU 413 Curriculum Development (3) F, Sp, Su 

Teacher Certification Course Only. A critical study of the organization, construction, and administration of 
learning experiences in modern educational theory with emphasis on the formulation of objectives, 
selection, organization and integration of instructional materials. Teacher certification course. 

EDU 414 New Trends in Education (3) F, Sp, Su 

Teacher Certification Course. An Education Elective for all education majors. An investigation of new trends in 
education at the local, state, and national levels. 

EDU 417 Teaching Social Studies in Middle and Secondary Schools (3) F, Sp, Su 

Teacher Certification Course. Methods and materials for teaching Social Studies in the middle and 
secondary school with emphasis on objectives, selection and organization of instructional units, teaching 
aids methods and procedures of instruction, and processes of evaluation. The needs of special students 
are also addressed. The course is based on State and National Standards. 

EDU 418 Teaching English in Middle and Secondary Schools (3) F, Sp, Su 

Teacher Certification Course and required for English Education majors. Prerequisites: Successful completion of 
ENC 101, 102, REA 101 Methods and materials for teaching English in the middle and secondary school 

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with emphasis on objectives, selection and organization of instructional units, teaching aids, methods and 
procedures of instruction and processes of evaluation. The course is based on State and National 
Standards. 

EDU 419 Teaching Science in Middle and Secondary Schools (3) F, Sp, Su 

Teacher Certification Course. Required for Science Education Majors. Objectives, contents, and methods in 
secondary school science programs with emphasis on current practices and instructional materials. The 
needs of special students are also addressed. The course is based on State and National Standards. 

EDU 422 Teaching Mathematics in the Middle Schools (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: Teacher certification course. Required for middle grades mathematics majors. Successful completion of 
200 and 300 level mathematics course A study of effective methods of teaching mathematics in the middle 
schools with a discussion of textbooks and tests. The course is based on State and National Standards. 

EDU 423 Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary Schools (3) F, Sp, Su 

Pre-requisite: Successful completion of 200 and 300 level mathematics course, and passed mathematics section of 
General Knowledge (GK). A study of effective methods of teaching mathematics in the secondary schools 
with a discussion of textbooks and tests. The course is based on State and National Standards. 

EDU 426 Content Area Reading (3) F, Sp, Su 

Pre-requisites: Successful completion of English 101, 102. Required for all Education majors. This course will 
focus on the pre-service teacher working towards enabling children to view reading as a powerful source 
of acquiring information, to use reading materials purposefully, to develop as proficient readers and 
learners who enjoy reading materials purposefully, and to develop as proficient readers and learners who 
enjoy reading and learning. The course will include theories about effective reading instruction and 
procedures for implementing that instruction, including diagnostic teaching techniques for students in 
grades K-12. Selected ESOL competencies are also infused. The course is based on State and National 
Standards. 

EDU 427 Language Art & Children's Literature in Elementary School (3) F, Sp, Su 

Pre-requisites: Successful completion of English 101, 102. All Elementary Education, Exceptional Education, and 
Middle Grades and Secondary English Education majors. This course considers principles of modern scientific 
study of language experience in a child's life, the nature of development of needs, interest, and abilities in 
the basic communication skills. It provides an overview of literary materials for children in early and 
elementary school with an emphasis on pre-service teachers becoming familiar with popular children's 
literature, on their being able to evaluate and select literature based on children's developmental 
appropriateness, and on their developing a sound methodology for using books to enrich children's lives. 
For students in grades K-12. Selected ESOL competencies are also infused. The course is based on State 
and National Standards. 



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EDU 428 Practicum in Reading (3) 

Pre-requisites: EDU 308, 411. This course is designed to afford students a supervised practicum to obtain 
practical experience in increasing the performance of a student(s) with the prescription and utilization of 
appropriate strategies and materials based upon scientifically based reading research to address the 
prevention, identification, and remediation of reading difficulties. 

EDU 429 Remedial Reaching of Reading (3) 

Pre-requisites: EDU 308, 411 This course provides students with a repertoire of knowledge and 
competencies necessary to identify and understand struggling readers, and also provides students with a 
repertoire of strategies, skills, and attitudes necessary to address remediation of reading difficulties. 

EDU 431 Teaching Music K-12 (3) F, Sp, Su 

Teacher Certification Course. Required for Music Education Majors. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all 
EDU courses. This course prepares students to teach music K-12 as required by the State of Florida, 
leading to the Music K-12 Teaching Certificate. The course places emphasis on practices and 
competencies needed to teach vocal and instrumental music in the school curriculum. It also involves 
analyzing contemporary methods of teaching music. The needs of special students are also addressed. 

EDU 439 Tests and Measurements (3) F, Sp, Su 

Required for all education majors except Exceptional Education majors. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of 200 
and 300 level mathematics courses. This course reflects the use of performance based procedures to measure 
complex achievement. The fuller array of assessment-procedures includes traditional and authentic 
assessment. 

EDU 450 Educational Internship (9) F, Sp 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all major requirements and all sections of General Knoivledge and 
Professional Education subtest. Practical experience in teaching activities of the classroom with the 
student in full charge of the class under the guidance of a skilled, experienced teacher in the field. 

EDU 455 Methods/Materials for Teaching Languages in the Elementary 

School (3) F, Sp Teacher Certification Course Only. Designed to acquaint the student with methods, media, 

and procedures especially applicable to the teaching of languages in the elementary or secondary school 

levels. A one-hour laboratory experience per week in a field school or college living-learning center is 

required. 

EDU 456 Teaching Spanish in the Elementary Schools (3) F, Sp, Su 

Teacher Certification Course Only. Designed methods, media, and procedures, applicable to the teaching of 
the Spanish language in the elementary school. There will be major emphasis on pronunciation, oral 
work, reading, reviews, examinations, tests, and supervised study. 



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EDU 457 Methods of Teaching Spanish in the Middle and Secondary School (3) F, Sp, Su 

Teacher Certification Course Only. Focuses on values of foreign language teaching, ultimate and immediate 
aims in Spanish language teaching, survey of methods, pronunciation, oral work, reading, grammar, 
reviews, examinations, tests, and supervised study. The course consists of readings and discussions, 
lesson planning and demonstrations, and organization of material for use in student teaching. 

EDU 458 General Methods of Teach Foreign Languages (K-12) (3) F, Sp, Su 

Teacher Certification Course Only. Designed to acquaint the student with methods, media, and procedures 
applicable to the teaching of foreign languages in grades K-12. This course consists of reading and 
discussions, lesson planning, and demonstrations. 

EDU 499 Independent Study (3) 

Prerequisites: Completion of General Core Courses. This course provides independent direction and 
supervision of a special topic in a specific area of education under the supervision of an education 
instructor. 

English for Speakers of Other Languages 

ESOL 401 Cultural Communications (3) F, Sp, S 

Prerequisite EDU 205. Teacher Certification Only. This course examines cultural factors which influence the 
acquisition of learning of native and target languages. The course will focus on how an awareness of 
native and target cultural factors contribute to the effective teaching of the respective language. 

ESOL 402 Curriculum and Materials Development (3) F, Sp, S 

Prerequisite: EDU 203, 204 or 206 and 205. Teacher Certification and All Education Majors. A study of the 
content development, materials, and evaluation of ESOL curriculum for use in bilingual or multilingual 
settings. The course includes a survey of techniques for assessing needs, determining objectives, and 
designing and evaluating curriculum materials. 

ESOL 403 Methodology of Teaching ESOL (3) F, Sp, S 

Prerequisite: EDU 203, 204 or 206 and 205. Teacher Certification Only. A survey of techniques used in 
teaching ESOL including a review of audio lingual, cognitive code, and functional/national approaches. 
This course examines curriculum and methods used in teaching and testing the skills of speaking, 
listening, understanding reading and writing. 

ESOL 404 Teaching and Evaluation in ESOL (3) F, Sp, S 

Prerequisite: EDU 203, 204 or 206 and 205. Teacher Certification Only. Development of teacher-made tests. 
Applied standard tests in ESOL & BLE classes. Interpretation of statistics data in grading. Testing the 
skills of speaking, listening, and understanding reading and writing. 



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ESOL 499 Independent Study in ESOL Education (3) F, Sp, S 

Prerequisite: Completion of General Core Courses and 300 level EDU or ESE courses. This course provides 
independent direction and supervision of a special topics English for Speakers of Other Languages 
education, under the supervision of an ESOL education instructor. 

ESOL 499 Independent Study in ESOL (3) 

Prerequisites: Completion of General Core Courses. This course provides independent direction and 
supervision of a special topic in a specific area of education under the supervision of an education 
instructor. 

English 

DSE 099 Essentials of College English (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course prepares students to be successful in ENG 101 College Writing I. The course concentrates on 
the fundamentals of Edited American English for writing and addresses grammar, mechanics, usage, 
sentence structure, and paragraph development in essays. Information technology is incorporated 
throughout the course. 

ENG 101 College Writing I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of DSE 099 or the required minimum scores on the writing and grammar 
sections of the placement test. This course focuses on effective writing, grammar review, and critical 
thinking. Students develop research and writing skills using classical rhetorical modes of argument and 
logic and by writing college-level essays and research papers with the use of information technology. 
This course will satisfy the Gordon Rule requirement in the Florida State University System. 

ENG 102 College Writing II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 101 or the required minimum scores on the writing and grammar 
section of the placement test. This is an intensive writing, reading, and research course. Students compose 
research papers and college-level essays based on readings from poetry, short stories, drama, novels, 
periodicals, and other literature, incorporating the use of information technology. This course will satisfy 
the Gordon Rule. 

ENG 111 First Year Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: None This course is designed to encourage an enjoyment of reading through literary works 
and poetry. Students will be encouraged to exchange ideas in open discussions of the reading and 
dramatic interpretation of the material. Critical response and self-expression will also be introduced and 
developed. This course will not satisfy the Gordon Rule requirement in the Florida State University 
System. 

ENG 201 World Literature I (3) F 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. Survey course in world literature. An appreciation of diverse cultures through the 
literature produced on the European and Asian continents by civilizations such as the Babylonians, 
Greeks, Chinese, Indians, Romans, Japanese, Scandinavians, and Anglo-Saxons, c. 700 B.C.E. to 1400 C.E. 



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ENG 202 World Literature II (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. A survey course in world literature. The continuance of World Literature I, from the 
Renaissance through the post World War II period. The multi-cultural approach will include European, 
Asian, African, and Native American writers. 

ENG 212 Ethnic American Literature (3) F 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. This course will focus on works written by African Americans, Native Americans, 
Mexican Americans, Asian Americans, Puerto Ricans, and others. 

ENG 297 Caribbean Literature (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. This course will include a representative range of Caribbean writers. 

ENG 301 Advanced Composition & Rhetoric (3) Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. Advanced comprehensive exercises in expository writing designed to develop 
sophistication of style in the student's writing. Upon approval of the advisor, this course can substitute 
for Eng 309. 

ENG 303 English Literature I (3) F 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. A survey course of English literature from the Middle Ages through the eighteenth 
century. 

ENG 304 English Literature II (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. A study of English authors of the Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and 
Contemporary periods. 

ENG 308 African American Literature (3) Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. A study of African American authors and their works to include a close 
examination of the African American legacy as a basis for understanding American civilization. 

ENG 309 Advanced Grammar & Composition (3) F, Su 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. An advanced course in developing and analyzing argumentative writing across a 
range of academic, professional, and popular writing contexts. Upon approval of the advisor, this course 
can substitute for Eng 301. 

ENG 310 Study Abroad (3-6) Su 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Director of the Study Abroad Program . On-site explorations of personalities, 
original manuscripts, and locales of major authors. 

ENG 315 Adolescent Literature (3) Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. An overview of literature written for, by, or about young adults 

ENG 316 African American Women Writers (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. This course is an overview of the writings of African American women from the 
Colonial period to the present. 

ENG 340 American Literature (1945 to the Present) (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. This course is a survey of American literature from 1945 to the present. 

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ENG 351 Contemporary Poetry (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. Poetry of the Contemporary Period, 1950 to the present. 

ENG 355 The Harlem Renaissance (3) F 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. Emphasis on writers, musicians, and artists of the Harlem Renaissance. 

ENG 361 Contemporary Fiction (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. Fiction of the Contemporary Period, 1950 to the present. 

ENG 371 Contemporary Drama (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. Drama of the Contemporary Period, 1950 to the present. 

ENG 383 Literary Criticism (3) F 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. Approaches to literary criticism. Emphasis on twentieth century theory, including 
Post-structuralism, gender studies, and multicultural criticism. 

ENG 400 The Novel (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. A study of the genre through selected novels. 

ENG 401 Renaissance Literature (3) F 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. A study of the major writers of the 16th and 17th centuries. 

ENG 402 Romantic Literature (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. A study of British poetry and prose, 1789-1832. 

ENG 403 Shakespeare (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. Examination of Shakespeare's representative plays and sonnets. 

ENG 404 Victorian Literature (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. A study of British literature from 1832- 1901. 

ENG 405 Creative Writing (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102 Analysis and writing of poems, drama, and short stories. 

ENG 410 Study Abroad (3-6) Su 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Director of the Study Abroad program. On-site explorations of personalities, 
original manuscripts, and locales of major authors. 

ENG 441 Women Writers (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. Selected readings of women's writings and feminist criticism. 

ENG 442 Postcolonial Literature (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. This course will include an interdisciplinary study of postcolonial literature by 
selected writers. 

ENG 443 Special Topics (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. Content to be determined by the Department as requested by faculty or students to 
fill specified needs or interests. May be taken twice for an additional three credits. 

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ENG 444 Mythology (3) F 

Prerequisite: ENG: 102. Survey course of major myths and noteworthy minor myths which various 
cultures have developed in attempts to come to terms with perceived reality. The course will also explore 
the helief systems which underlie those myths and enable students to recognize the continued relevance 
of myth and myth-making. 

ENG 455 American Literature (1800-1865) (3) F 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. A survey course of American literature in the early 19 th century through the Civil 
War. Representative works include those of Emerson, Whitman, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Horton, 
Douglass, Stowe, Brown, Jacobs, Fuller, and other American writers. 

ENG 456 American Literature (1865-1914) (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. Realism in American literature: representative works include Clemens, Howells, 
James, Chopin, Washington, Gilman, Du Bois, Crane, Dreiser, and other American writers. 

ENG 457 American Literature (1914-1945) (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. Modernism in American Literature: representative works include Millay, Frost, 
Anderson, O'Neill, Eliot, Hurston, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Hughes, Wright, and other American writers. 

ENG 460 Applied Linguistics (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prereqirisite: ENG 102. An overview of the principles of linguistics applied to language teaching and 
learning. Emphasis on constructive analysis of native and target languages applied to teaching 
bilingual/ESOL or foreign language students. This course is not applicable as credits toward an English 
degree. 

ENG 465 Internship (3) Su 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. This course provides the student with on-the-job training under the auspices of the 
employer and department advisor. May be taken twice for an additional three credits. 

ENG 495 Senior Project (3) F 

Prerequisite: Permission of advisor. A capstone course in English requiring research, critical thinking, 
technology, presentation, and scholarly proficiency. MLA format is required. 

English as a Second Language 

ESL 098 College Language Skills I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Placement examination. A fundamental college course primarily for non-native speakers of 
English. Stress is on the development of all communication skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) 
toward gaining functional proficiency in critical reading and academic writing. 

ESL 099 College Language Skills II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Placement examination or ESL 098. Continued development of all communication skills 
(listening, speaking, reading, writing) toward gaining functional proficiency in critical reading and 
academic writing. 



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Environmental Studies 

ENV 101 Introduction to Environmental Science (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a general introduction to environmental concepts, including a history of the environmental 
movement, global habitats, ecosystem dynamics, population dynamics, living resources, biodiversity, 
environmental hazards, 
environmental justice, energy resources, air and water resources, eco-spirituality, and sustainability. 

ENV 131 Introduction to Earth Science (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course is designed as a survey of astronomy, geology, meteorology, and marine science to prepare 
teachers of earth science in the middle schools. 

ENV 301 Wetland Ecology (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: BIO 130. An examination of the structure, function, and dynamics of wetland ecosystems, 
with emphases on wetlands in tropical and semi-tropical regions and the effects of human activities. 

ENV 302 Wetland Ecology Laboratory (1) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: BIO 131. A field examination of the structures and dynamics of wetland ecosystems in 
Southern Florida, including soil types, indicator species, and human influences. 

ENV 304/GEO 304 Population Studies (3) Sp 

A study of demographic patterns, fertility, birth rates, death rates, and a comparison of population 
growth and problems and issues. 

ENV 331 Urban Ecology (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: BIO 320. An examination of urban and suburban ecosystems, emphasizing energy relations, 
ecological functions of urban landscapes, urban wildlife, urban forestry, and ecological issues relevant to 
human health and well-being. 

ENV 332 Urban Ecology Laboratory (1) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: BIO 321. A field examination of the structures and dynamics of urban ecosystems in Southern 
Florida, including soil types, indicator species, and human influences. 

ENV 362 Spirit and Nature (3) F, Sp, Su 

A survey of environmental philosophy and theology, including deep ecology, eco-feminism, social 
ecology, creation theology, and earth wisdom. 

ENV 381 Air Resources (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: ENV 101. An examination of common air pollutants, their sources, methods of control, and 
various legislative and administrative approaches. 

ENV 382 Water Resources (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: ENV 101. An examination of water use and management, water pollution problems, and 
methods of control and treatment. 

ENV 383 Biotic Resources (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: ENV 101. An examination of the earth's biomes and the factors influencing their productivity, 
conservation, and human use. Particular attention will be given to sustainability. 

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ENV 384 Energy Resources (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: ENV 101. An examination of energy resources and power generation in modern society, as 
well as the fundamental energy relationships between industrial and domestic processes. 

ENV 401 Ecology of South Florida (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: BIO 320. An examination of the structure, function, and dynamics of the South Florida 
ecosystems. 

ENV 402 South Florida Ecology Laboratory (1) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: BIO 321. A field examination of the structures and dynamics of ecosystems in South Florida, 
including the identification of selected species. 

ENV 450 Field Studies in Environmental Studies (3) F, Sp, Su 

Original investigations on a topic in environmental studies conducted in the field under the supervision 
of a directing faculty member. 

ENV 451 Senior Seminar (3) F, Sp, Su 

A series of talks and exercises on the development of professional skills, data presentation, current 
environmental topics, and the presentation of original field or library research. 

ENV 470 Natural Resource Management (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in Environmental Science. An introduction to the management of natural 
resources, including timber, fisheries, national parks, rangelands, and mining. 

ENV 471 Environmental Policy in the United States (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: Senior standing in Environmental Science or permission of the instructor. An introduction to 
environmental policy, including applicable environmental legislation, and the role of regulation at the 
national, state, and county levels. 

Exceptional Student Education 

ESE 408 Behavior Management for Students with Varying Exceptionalities (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: ESE 430, ESE 434. Exceptional Student Education majors only. A comprehensive course that 
focuses on the positive manipulation of the learning environment to promote successful behavior and 
skill acquisition. The student will learn how to do preventive discipline —proactive strategies and 
activities appropriate for managing the spectrum of exceptional students. 

ESE 430 Introduction to Exceptional Child Education (3) F, Sp, S 

Prerequisites: Completion of all 200 level EDU courses and approval of instructor. Exceptional Student Education 

majors only. On overview of effective teaching methods and procedures for exceptional children. It 

includes historical perspective, recent programming efforts for children with impairments in vision, 

hearing, language and speech, emotional 

problems and learning disabilities. It also covers children with limited intellectual capacity and gifted 

children. 



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ESE 434 Characteristics of Individuals with Varying Exceptionalities (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite ESE 430. Exceptional Student Education majors only. The course integrates theory, research, and 
practice in the field of mental retardation, specific learning disabilities, and emotional handicaps. The 
course emphasizes definitions and concepts, theories of learning, classification, prevalence, etiologies, 
behavioral characteristics, prevention and intervention strategies, multicultural issues, and classroom 
technology. Also at-risk factors associated with learning disabilities, emotional handicaps, and mental 
retardation. Service delivery system will be reviewed and current research and trends discussed. 

ESE 435 Curriculum and Instruction for Mild to Moderate Individuals with Varying Exceptionalities 
(3) F, Sp 

Prerequisites: ESE 430, ESE 434. Exceptional Student Education majors only. 

A comprehensive course covering curriculum, methods, and materials designed for mild to moderate 
levels of learning disabled, emotionally handicapped, and mentally handicapped individuals. Topics 
include preferred behavior management strategies and observation methods for problem behaviors used 
for teaching and managing students who display complex behavior problems and who need academic 
and pre-functional living skills. The course also covers strategic and tactical planning as well as curricula 
for academic, social, and prevocational skills development. 

ESE 436 Curriculum and Instruction for Mild to Moderate Individuals with Varying Exceptionalities II 
(3) F, Sp 

Prerequisites: ESE 430, ESE 434, ESE 435. Exceptional Student Education majors only. This course provides an 
exhaustive covering of curriculum, methods, and materials designed for mild to moderate levels of 
learning disabled, emotionally handicapped, and mentally handicapped individuals through the 
continuation of Curriculum and Instruction I. More in-depth coverage of diagnostic procedures, planning 
techniques, instructional methods, uses of technology, and the instructional needs of individuals from 
diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds. 

ESE 447 Assessment of Exceptional Students (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisites: ESE 430, ESE 435, or ESE 430 and ESE 444. Exceptional Student Education majors only. This 
course provides a comprehensive guide to the assessment of students with disabilities. An understanding 
of the assessment process and the concrete, practical skills necessary to assess exceptional students will be 
examined. 

ESE 448 Teaching in an Inclusive, Collaborative, Consultative, Diverse Environment (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisites: ESE 430, ESE 434, ESE 435, ESE 436, ESE 447. Exceptional Student Education and Elementary 
Education majors only. A course preparing teachers to meet the individual needs of students at-risk, with 
disabilities, or both, and who have been integrated into the general education classroom. 

ESE 499 Independent Study in Exceptional Student Education (3) 

Prerequisites: Completion of General Core Courses and 300 level EDU. Exceptional Student Education majors only. 
This course provides independent direction and supervision of a special topic in Exceptional Student 
Education (ESE) under the supervision of an ESE instructor. 

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Finance 

FIN 301 Principles of Finance (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MAT 111. This course is designed to make students better decision-makers by focusing on 
contemporary finance problems facing today's manager. It examines how financial theories can be used 
in an environment characterized by market and institutional realities. 

FIN 323 Corporate Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing. This course provides an understanding of the theory and practice of 
making financial decisions for corporations including the environment in which decisions are made, the 
available choices and decision criteria, and valuation consequences of the choices. It also provides 
students skills in financial analysis, planning, and decision making. 

FIN 333 Investments (3) 

Prerequisite : Junior or Senior standing. This course provides an understanding of capital market securities, 
operations, valuation, and investment techniques. It covers definitions of various investment vehicles, 
operation of the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, portfolio theory, valuation of stocks and bonds, and 
investor capital allocation decisions. 

FIN 350 Principles of Financial Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: FIN 301. A study of the basic concepts in financial planning as it relates to income tax 
planning, educational planning, Investment planning, wealth accumulation planning and estate planning. 
Also the legal and ethical environments of financial planners. 

FIN 493 Portfolio Analysis & Management (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: FIN 301. Integrates theoretical concepts with investment applications, and stresses the 
economic rationale for various investments. Software support enriches the learning experience by 
simulating the real world of investments. Students create and manage portfolios, trade stocks, bonds, 
warrants, options, futures contracts, and foreign currency. 

FIN 495 Futures & Options Markets (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: FIN 301. This course focuses on understanding how to use the financial future and options, 
the related cash and debt markets to achieve various financial risk management goals. The underlying 
objectives are: concepts, empirical evidence, and essential tools that facilitate the understanding of 
techniques and applications of hedging, pricing, and arbitrage. 

FIN 496 Financial Statement Analysis (3) F 

Prerequisite: FIN 301. This course provides a comprehensive analysis of financial statements using data 
bases, published documents, and privately prepared reports. Software is utilized for planning models, 
forecasting models, and simulations. 

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FIN 497 International Money & Finance (3) F 

Prerequisite: FIN 301. This course examines the following international concepts: the foreign exchange 
market, the balance of trade and payments, currency futures, options, and swaps, exchange rates and 
interest parity, international bond market, import and export financing, financial management of the 
multinational firm, and the international money market. 

FMU 101 University 101 (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course is designed to help new college students develop study habits, attitudes and knowledge 
which will lead to academic success. The course content includes Florida Memorial University's history 
and resources, student time management, study methods, memory techniques, career exploration, and 
cultural literacy. 

French 

FRE 201 Elementary French I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Pre-Co-requisite: ENG 101. This course introduces the phonetic and spelling systems of the French 
language and emphasizes the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) and 
cultural aspects of the Francophone world. NOT open to native or near-native speakers of French. 

FRE 202 Elementary French II (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: FRE 201. This course continues development of the four basic language skills and advances 
students in an understanding of the culture of the Francophone world. NOT open to native or near-native 
speakers of French. 

FRE 301 Intermediate French I (3) F 

Prerequisite: FRE 202 or equivalent. This course emphasizes practice in developing oral skill using readings, 
dialogues, and dramatic sources . It also emphasizes intermediate grammar skills and develops a fuller 
understanding of the structure of the French language. Aspects of French culture discussed. NOT open to 
native speakers. 

FRE 302 Intermediate French II (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: FRE 301 or equivalent. This course emphasizes practice in developing writing skills, focusing 
on descriptive, narrative, expository and persuasive essay models from newspapers, magazines and 
literary sources. It also provides practice in grammar skills. 

FRE 303 Survey of French Culture and Civilization I (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: FRE 302 or equivalent. This course explores the most important aspects of the culture and 
civilization of the Francophone world. It includes geography, history, societal, and economic trends, and 
the folklore of the peoples involved. 

FRE 304 Survey of French Culture and Civilization II (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: FRE 302 or equivalent. This course explores the most important aspects of the culture and 
civilization of the Francophone world, focusing on contemporary issues. 



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FRE 305 Survey of French Literature I (3) F 

Prerequisite: FRE 302 or equivalent. This course surveys the literature of France from its earliest 
manifestation through the 17th century. 

FRE 306 Survey of French Literature II (3) F 

Prerequisite: FRE 302 or equivalent. Continuation of the survey of the literature of France from 18th century 
to the contemporary period. Literary tendencies in other French speaking regions will be included. 

FRE 307 Advanced French Grammar and Composition (3) F 

Prerequisite: FRE 302 or equivalent. A detailed study of traditional grammar and composition, designed 
primarily for French minors and future teachers. Particular attention will be paid to correct usage in 
written communication. 

FRE 308 Advanced French Composition (3) F 

Prerequisite: FRE 307. A detailed study of the theory and practice of written communication, including a 
review of syntax and emphasizing rhetoric and style. 

FRE 309 Business French (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: FRE 302 or equivalent. Concentrated practice in the vocabulary and style of business 
correspondence and documents used in the present day Francophone world. This course is designed to 
improve skills in French for native speakers and others desiring to improve professional communication 
skills in the world of commerce. 

FRE 312 French for Native Speakers I (3) F, Sp 

This course is intended for native speakers who have had less than two (2) years or no course work in 
French in high school. It covers spelling, syntax and grammar, focusing on problems faced by native 
speakers as well as readings and practice in writing compositions in French. 

FRE 313 French for Native Speakers II (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: FRE 312. Concentrated practice in developing writing skills, focusing on descriptive, 
narrative, expository and persuasive essay models from newspapers, magazines and literary sources with 
special attention to problems faced by native speakers. 

FRE 319 Advanced French Reading and Conversation (3) F, Sp 

Concentrated practice in speaking skills at the advanced level. The course requires intensive reading and 
conversation and oral presentations in the French language. Designed primarily for future teachers. Open 
to native speakers or others with near native fluency. 

FRE 370 French Study Abroad (3-6) Su 

This course offers a total immersion in the French language and culture through basic reading, writing 
and conversation. It focuses on fundamental grammar and on the culture and folklore of the host country. 
School/Department approval required. 

FRE 371 Intermediate French Study Abroad (3-6) Su 

Prerequisite: FRE 202. This course offers total immersion in the target language through intermediate 
reading and conversation. It includes intermediate writing and grammar. Class discussions will focus on 
contemporary French cultural issues and the folklore of the host country. School/Department approval 
required. 

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FRE 444 19th Century French Literature (3) F 

A study of the literary trends of the century — Romanticism, Realism and Naturalism and representative 

works. 

FRE 445 20th Century French Literature (3) Sp 

A study of the literary trends of the century— surrealism existentialism, theater of the absurd — and 

representative works. 

FRE 448 African and Caribbean French Literature (3) F 

A study of the Negritude literary movement, focusing on its origin, development and influence in 

contemporary African and Caribbean French speaking regions, including Haiti and others. 

Geography 

GEO 302 Cultural Geography (3) F, Su 

A study of humans' activities in the light of the interaction and interdependence of the physical and 
cultural environments. The emphasis will be placed on the relationship between persons and 
environment through time and on the distribution of population settlement and resource utilization 
processes which have transformed natural landscapes into cultural landscapes. Permission of instructor 
required. 

GEO 303 World Regional Geography (3) Sp, Su 

The geography of the world's major cultural regions. Emphasis on geographic aspects of contemporary 
economic, social, and political conditions. Permission of the instructor required. 

GEO 304/ENV 304 Population Studies (3) Sp 

A study of demographic patterns, fertility, birth rates, death rates, and a comparison of population 
growth and problems and issues. 

Health Education 

HED 211 Human Sexuality (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of PED 110. This class addresses human sexuality as a dynamic and 
complex force that involves psychological, socio-cultural, and physiological dimensions. 

HED 221 Nutritional Health (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of PED 110. This class is designed to provide students with information 
about the science of food and the effects that diet and nutrition have on a person's well-being. 

HED 231 Substance Abuse (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of PED 110. This class is designed to provide students with information 
about the historical and social context in which the drugs were presented in addition to how drugs affect 
our lives. These drugs include human psychoactive drugs, alcohol, coffee, and cigarettes. 



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HED 311 Communicable Diseases (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of PED 110. This class is designed to provide students with information 
about the nature, prevention, control, and treatment of various communicable, acute, and chronic 
diseases. 

HED 321 Environmental Health (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of PED 110. This class is designed to provide students with information 
about the interactions of humans with their environment and the impact of the interactions on their 
health. 

HED 411 Mental and Emotional Health (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of PED 110. This class is designed to provide students with information 
about the impact of stress and emotions on mental health. 

HED 421 Consumer Health (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of PED 110. This class is designed to provide students basic necessary 
information about all consumer products, services, and consumer protection vehicles that influence the 
health and welfare of people. 

History 

HIS 101 World Civilization I (3) F, Sp, Su 

This is an intensive reading and writing course. This survey course provides a balanced perspective on 
the birth of civilization and the development of early human cultures. It includes a prehistoric vision of 
the world beginning with great river valleys and extending to the age of reason and the scientific 
revolution. 

HIS 102 World Civilization II (3) F, Sp, Su 

This is an intensive reading and writing course. This course provides a chronological survey of persons 
and their institutions from the age of reason and science to the present. Emphasis is placed on 
understanding the development of political, social, economic, philosophical, and religious ideas of 
various cultures. 

HIS 103 African American History I (3) F, Sp, Su 

This is an intensive reading course. The course promotes the awareness and exploration of relevant books 
and materials concerning the lives, struggles, achievements, and contributions of African Americans. An 
opportunity is provided for students to view the past and investigate the present. 

HIS 104 African American History II (3) F, Sp, Su 

This is an intensive reading course. This course is a continuation of African American History I and 
allows for the study of relevant books and materials concerning the African American experience through 
the Post-Reconstruction 
era, the age of Accommodation, Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights era, and beyond. 



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HIS 200 History of the United States of America (3) F, Sp, Su 

This is an intensive reading and writing course. A survey of the main events of the history of the United 
States of America from the Age of Discovery to the present. 



HIS 300 Historical Thought and Writing (3) F, Sp 

A seminar designed to introduce students to historical perspectives and to the process of writing history. 
Practice in critical analysis, research methodology, documentation, bibliographic forms and composition, 
culminating in a major 
research paper. 

HIS 321 U.S. History to 1865 (3) F 

Prerequisite: HIS 200. An intensive survey of the main events in the discovery and settlement, 
independence, and growth of the United States to the end of the Civil War. 

HIS 324 U.S. History Since 1865 (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: HIS 200. A survey of the history of the United States from 1865 to the present, with emphasis 
on the interaction of political, social, and economic developments in the light of the nation's heritage and 
its contributions to the world community. 

HIS 335 Africa in the Modern World (3) F 

This course provides students with the historical background needed to understand Africa. Focuses on 
major political, social, economic, and cultural developments from the rise of the transatlantic slave trade 
to the present. 

HIS 350 History of the Caribbean (3) Sp 

Development of the major islands of Cuba, Hispanola, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico from colonial times to the 
present. Emphasizes evolution of plantation societies, slavery and race relations, international rivalries, 
economic dependence, and political independence. Offered in alternate years. 

HIS 400 History of the Non-Western World (3) Sp 

Prerequisites: HIS 101 and 102. Survey of the history of three major areas of the non-western world: the 
Middle East and India, the Far East and Africa. Emphasis will be placed upon historical, political, 
economic, and social conditions. 

HIS 405 Women in U.S. History (3) F 

Beginning with European and African backgrounds, the course will trace the experience of women in the 
United States from the Colonial to the present periods. Emphasis will be given to historical and 
contemporary issues in the 

women's movements and to the efforts of women as workers, professionals, volunteers, and political 
activists in the shaping of our national history. 

HIS 410 History of Florida and the South (3) Sp 

A survey course of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of Florida and the South, 
with special emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 



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HIS 420 Independent Study (3) F, Sp, Su 

Guided readings or activities in the social sciences. Open to students majoring in the social sciences. 
Permission of instructor required. 

HIS 430 Selected Topics in History (3) Su 

Topics will vary from year to year. Seminars may be held on American, African, European, or Asian 
History. This course involves an intensive study of some phase of history. Emphasis will be placed on 
historical methods, research techniques, and the teaching of history. Open to juniors and seniors by 
permission of instructor. 

Honors 

ENG 104H & ENG 105H College Writing Honors (3) F, Sp 

The course sequence ENG 104 and ENG 105 provides students with both a reading and writing intensive 
format. Students respond to works of authors of world literature as well as philosophy through writing 
assignments, group 

discussions, and oral presentations. The goal of all writing assignments is the production of a scholarly 
term paper with appropriate documentation at the end of each respective semester. 

CSC 202H Technology (3) F, Sp 

An in-depth exposure to the use of information technology in academia, business, and society. Special 
emphasis is placed on technology applications using microcomputers, spreadsheets, database and word 
processing software, and 
use of the Internet. 

HIS 201H, 202H, African American History I, II (Honors) (3) F, Sp 

This two-semester course sequence scans the varied landscape of African, Caribbean and African 
American history and the multifaceted experiences of people of the African Diaspora. Employing a 
pedagogy based on lectures which make connections between the present and past experiences of African 
people. 

MAT 103H, 104H, Honors Mathematics I, II, (3) F, Sp 

These two honors courses offered in sequence cover mathematical systems, modular arithmetic, structure 
algebra, basic algebraic operations, determinants, set theory, and logic. 

RSC 303H Research Methods (3) F, Sp 

This course prepares students to use the scientific method to plan for and conduct scholarly research. 
Exposure will be given in designing a research study by formulating a problem statement, objectives, and 
hypotheses, as well as 
data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation. 

RSC 403H Honors Thesis (3) F, Sp, Su 

A culmination of the student's scholarly research activities. The thesis will be prepared by the student in 
conjunction with a faculty advisor. The thesis will be a scholarly document and presented for final 
approval to a faculty committee. 



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SCI 104H, 105H Insight I, II (3) F, Sp 

This two course sequence provides an overview of astronomy, physics, chemistry, and earth science. 
Using energy as its central theme, the courses cover the production and utilization of energy in plants and 
animals, energy consumption, and energy flows. 

SEM 101H, 102H Honors Seminar I, II (2) F, Sp 

This two-semester course affords the students the opportunity to study in depth topics of particular 
importance to society. The topics include global issues, use of information technology, and ethical 
questions. Written exercises 
and individual and group presentations are integral components of the Honors Seminars. 

Human Resource Management 

HRM 350 Human Resource Management (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: BUS 211. Introduction to the management of effectively utilizing human resources in 
organizations. Emphasis is on employment law, recruitment, selection, training, performance appraisal, 
compensation, and labor relations. 

HRM 360 The Legal Environment of Human Resource Management (3) 

Prerequisite: HRM 350. The law as it pertains to the process of Human Resource Management, with special 
emphasis on equal employment opportunity law. 

HRM 380 Compensation Management F, Sp 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing, BUS 380. The principles of compensation management, job analysis 
and evaluation, establishment and administration of pay systems, employee benefits, and executive 
compensation. 

HRM 410 Labor Relations 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing, BUS 350, HR 370. The role of management and unions in our society, 
labor-management problems and their resolution, the collective bargaining process, the legal framework 
of labor-management relations, administration of the labor contract. 

HRM 420 Staffing and Development 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing, BUS 350, HR 370. The role of human resource professionals at every 
stage of the employment process from hiring to posting, staffing policies, internal and external 
recruitment, HR development strategies and training programs development. 

HRM 430 Creating Productive Relationships 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing, BUS 350. A practical and theoretical course dealing with behavior. 
Emphasis will be placed on identifying and classifying behavior in order to understand behavior and to 
develop strategies for effectively managing interpersonal relationships. Exercises and role playing to 
illustrate major points. 



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Marketing 

MAR 301 Principles of Marketing (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: MAT 111, ENG 102. A introduction to the field of marketing and its related concepts. The 
course focuses on how to facilitate mutually satisfying exchanges in both the business to consumer 
market and the business to business market. 

MAR 361 Retail Marketing (3) F 

Prerequisite: MAR 301. An examination of the role of retailing in marketing. Attention is focused on 
fundamentals for successful retail management. This course emphasizes basic marketing principles, 
procedures, and the selling environment. Major attention is paid to aligning the marketing mix in 
response to unfulfilled customer needs. 

MAR 362 Personal Selling (3) F 

Prerequisite: MAR 301. Learning to develop and apply essential professional selling skills to effectively 
market yourself and the organization you represent. Basic concepts, processes, and techniques for selling, 
including customer analysis, prospecting, developing rapport, handling objections, customer service, and 
other related areas. 

MAR 395 Consumer Behavior (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: MAR 301, PSY 200 or SOC 200. A description and conceptual analysis of consumer buyer 
behavior. The focus is on the theory and research essential to the understanding of individual choice 
behavior. 

MAR 460 Advertising (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: MAR 301. A study and analysis of successful advertising principles. This enables students to 
appraise advertising effectiveness as a marketing tool and assess its social and economic significance. 

MAR 461 Marketing Channels (3) Sp 

Prerequisites: MAR 301, MAR 395. This course focuses upon institutions, functions and decision-making 
in marketing channels. Wholesaling mid distribution systems in retailing are emphasized. The causes 
and resolution of channel power and conflict are also addressed. 

MAR 462 International Marketing (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: MAR 301. A global approach to the study of comparative marketing systems, including 
economic, social, technological, governmental, and political environments as they affect international 
marketing operations. 

MAR 463 Survey of E-Commerce (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: MAR 301. This course is designed to provide an overview of a new paradigm for business 
transactions. Focuses on electronic interactions and exchanges amongst businesses, between businesses 

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and consumers, and the infrastructure providers as they converge for the purchase and sale of goods, 
services, ideas, and information over the Internet. 



MAR 487 Seminar in Marketing (3) Sp 

Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of the Chairperson. This course examines consideration of current 
issues in marketing. Readings required from current marketing publications and other related 
periodicals. 

MAR 490 Service Marketing (3) F 

Prerequisites: MAR 301, MAR395. This course examines product support services, the nature and 
characteristics of service, and the building of customer satisfaction through the facilitating of mutually 
satisfying exchange. Special attention will be given to survey instruments such as the relevant 
dimensions of service quality. 

MAR 495 Marketing Research (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisites: BUS 312, MAR 301. A study of fundamental techniques of market research. Students define 
marketing problems, develop methodology, gather and process secondary and primary sources of 
information. The results are formally communicated. 

Mathematics 

DSM 099 Essentials of College Math II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: The required minimum score on the placement test. This course prepares students to be 
successful in MAT 110 Intermediate Algebra. As an introductory Algebra, the course covers simplifying 
and evaluating algebraic expressions, and solving linear equations involving integers, fractions, decimals, 
percents, and their applications. The course also covers reading and interpreting graphs, simplifying 
polynomials and exponents, factoring expressions, and solving basic geometry problems. 

MAT 110 Intermediate Algebra (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of DSM 099 with a grade of "C" or better or the required minimum 
score on the placement test. This course covers topics such as factoring; operations with rational 
expressions, absolute value; exponents, radicals and roots; complex numbers; linear and quadratic 
equations and linear inequalities; graphs; and systems of equations, all with applications throughout the 
course. 

MAT 111 College Algebra (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Placement test result or successful completion of MAT 110 with a grade of "C" or better. 
This course is an in-depth study of algebraic concepts, such as solving, graphing and applying linear and 
quadratic equations and inequalities; linear, quadratic, rational, absolute value, exponential and 
logarithmic functions; the Cartesian plane, distance, midpoint and the circle; representation of functions, 
domain, range, and evaluation of functions; and systems of equations and inequalities, all with 
applications throughout the course. 



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MAT 112 Pre-Calculus (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Completion of MAT 111 with a grade of "C" or better or permission of instructor. This course is an 
in-depth study of the concept of functions and their representations: polynomial, piecewise-defined, 
absolute value, rational, radical functions; sum difference, product, quotient, and composition of 
functions; systems of (2x2) linear equations 

MAT 113 College Trigonometry (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Completion of MAT 111 with a grade of "C" or better. This course is an in-depth study of 
properties of trigonometric functions and their graphs, inverse trigonometric functions, and polar 
coordinates. 

MAT 114 Finite Mathematics (Formerly MAT 102 /105) (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of MAT 111 with a grade of "C" or better. 

This course covers the basic aspects of sets, number sense, bases other than ten, symbolic logic, statistics, 
probability, and plane geometry. This course provides a thorough treatment of the mathematics 
appropriate for future educators. 

MAT 200 Applied Calculus (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 112 with grade of "C" or better. The applications of calculus using computer algebra 
systems. A brief review of functions and plane analytic geometry; intuitive and geometric definitions of 
limit, continuity and derivatives; derivatives of elementary functions; applications of derivatives 
including optimization problems taken from various disciplines; indefinite integral, Riemann sums and 
definite integral; elementary techniques of integration; and applications of integration in various 
disciplines. 

MAT 201 Calculus I (3) 

Prereqinsite: MAT 113 with grade of "C" or better, or permission of instructor. A brief review of functions and 
plane analytic geometry; intuitive and geometric definitions of limit, continuity and derivative; 
differentiation of elementary functions; and applications of derivatives, including sketching graphs of 
functions, and optimization problems. 

MAT 202 Calculus II (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 201 with grade of "C" or better. Indefinite integral, Riemann sums and definite integral, 
elementary integration techniques, and applications of integration. 

MAT 205 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prereqinsite: MAT 112 with grade of "C" or better. Probability concepts, discrete and continuous 
distributions, random variables, expectation and variance, frequency distribution, statistical inferences 
and sampling, hypotheses testing for the mean and variance of a population. 

MAT 210 Discrete Mathematics I (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 112 with grade of "C" or better. Propositional and predicate logic, set theory, axiomatic 
construction of mathematical structures, mapping, cardinal numbers, and principles of mathematical 
induction. 

MAT 211 Discrete Mathematics II (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 210 with grade of "C" or better. Boolean Algebra, combinatorics, elementary graphs 
theory, trees, recurrence relations, and elementary dynamical systems. 

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MAT 301 Calculus III (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 202 with grade of "C" or better. Inverse functions, integration techniques, L'Hospital's 
rule and indeterminate forms, improper integration differentiation and integration of functions in polar 
and parametric forms, and infinite sequences and series. 

MAT 302 Multivariate Calculus (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 202 with grade of "C" or better. A short review of calculus of one variable; three 
dimensional coordinate systems; scalar valued functions of several variables and their graphs; equations 
of curves, surfaces, and solids; limits; continuity; partial derivatives of several variables; applications of 
derivatives; multiple integration of scalar valued functions. 

MAT 303 History of Mathematics (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 202 with grade of "C" or better. Origins of arithmetic and geometric concepts in early 
cultures, the development of mathematics in African, Chinese, Hindu, Arabic, and other cultures, 
mathematics in the 17th and 18th centuries, mathematics in the 19th and 20 th centuries. 

MAT 305 College Geometry (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 202 with a grade of "C" or better or permission of instructor. Properties of points, lines, 
planes; study of geometric figures: rays, line segments, curves, polygons: properties of parallel lines; 
properties of triangles and polygons; the Pythagorean theorem, congruency and similarity of triangles; 
measurements of angles, area, and volume; transformation geometry; non-Euclidean geometry. 

MAT 307 Number Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 112 with grade of "C" or better. Properties of numbers, divisibility, Euclidean Algorithm, 
congruence and residue classes, Diaphantine equations, and quadratic residues. 

MAT 309 Introduction to Modern Algebra (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 211. Algebraic systems, equivalence classes, groups, rings, and fields. 

MAT 350 Linear Algebra I (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 112 with grade of "C" or better. Matrices and their operations, systems of equations and 

matrices, determinants; properties of Rn: linear combinations, linear dependence and independence, 

basis, dimension, subspaces, matrices as linear transformations, inner product, eigenvalues, and 

eigenvectors. 

MAT 351 Linear Algebra II (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 350, MAT 201 zoitli grade of "C" or better. Abstract vector spaces, linear transformations, 

positive definite matrices, canonical forms of matrices, applications in difference and differential 

equations. 

MAT 402 Advanced Calculus (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 302 with a grade of "C" or better. A rigorous treatment of the real and complex number 
systems, elements of set theory; limits, continuity, differentiability, and integration, numerical sequences 
and series; sequences and series of functions; power series; functions of several variables. 

MAT 403 Real Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 301 with a grade of "C" or better. Sets and functions; sequences of real numbers; series 
of real numbers; metric spaces; limits of a function on metric spaces; continuous functions on metric 

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spaces; connectedness, completeness and compactness; elementary functions and Taylor series; sequences 
and series of functions. 

MAT 404 Topology (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 403 with grade of "C" or better. Sets and functions; metric spaces; topological spaces; 
matrix, product and quotient spaces; compactness and connectedness; function spaces. 

MAT 405 Vector Calculus (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 302 with grade of'C" or better. The geometry of Euclidean space; vector-valued functions; 
limits, continuity and partial derivatives of vector- valued functions; integration; line and surface integral. 

MAT 406 Complex Variables (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 302 with grade of "C" or better. Complex numbers and their algebraic properties; 
elementary functions of complex variables; mapping; limit, continuity, differentiability, and integral of 
functions of complex variables; sequences and series of complex numbers; transformations. 

MAT 409 Dynamical Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 201 and MAT 350 with grade of "C" or better. Continuous dynamical systems: functions, 
iteration using technology, orbits, fixed and periodic points, logistic function, graphical analysis, stability, 
analysis of quadratic functions, chaotic quadratic functions; introduction to discrete dynamical modeling, 
deriving discrete dynamical systems, equilibrium points, cobwebs, deriving difference equations, linear 
dynamical systems and applications to finance, social sciences, and Makov chains; nonlinear discrete 
dynamical systems and model of population growth and harvesting strategies, Newton's method, 
stability, bifurication, and chaos. 

MAT 410 Ordinary Differential Equations (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 301 with grade of "C" or better. First order linear and nonlinear equations, numerical 
methods, second and higher order linear equations, series solutions, systems of linear and nonlinear 
equations, phase plane, stability; applications. 

MAT 411 Numerical Analysis I (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 410 with a grade of "C" or better. The real number system, error analysis, solutions of 
nonlinear equations, interpolation and approximation, and numerical differentiation and integration. 

MAT 412 Numerical Analysis II (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 411 with a grade of "C" or better. Matrices and systems of linear equations, solutions of 
difference and differential equations, and boundary-value problems. 

MAT 414 Probability Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 205, MAT 202 with grades of "C" or better. Finite probability spaces, random variables 
and combinations of events; dependence and independence, elementary limit theorems, infinite 
probability spaces, probability density and distribution functions, expectations, moment generating 
functions, and Central Limit Theorem. 

MAT 420 Directed Reading I (3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. An introduction to the techniques of scientific investigation. Students, 
with the help of the instructor, choose a problem in mathematics and design a procedure for 
investigation. The problem may not be original; the purpose is to help students broaden and integrate 

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their background in mathematics. Students write reports on their investigation with well-documented 
supporting evidence and present them to the instructor. Then they defend their investigation orally 
before colleagues, faculty, and visitors during the final week of the semester. 

MAT 421 Directed Reading II (3) 

Open to students who have successfully completed or want to continue with their investigation of the 
problem that they have chosen in MAT 420. 
MAT 450 Senior Project in Mathematics (3) 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. This course is an introduction to the technique of scientific investigation. 
Senior students, with the help of a mathematics faculty, choose problems in mathematics and design 
procedures for investigation, investigate, write well-documented reports, and present them orally before 
colleagues and faculty. The problem may not be original; the purpose is to expose students to scientific 
investigate techniques. 

Music 

MUS 100 Music Fundamentals (3) 

Introduction and review of music fundamentals such as the great staff, musical clefs, major and minor 
scales, key signatures, intervals, and principles of rhythmic notation. Advanced students may test out. 

MUS 101 Structures of Music I (3) 

Prerequisite: MUS 106 or permission of instructor. This course is a continuation of MUS 106 and includes 
popular music chord symbols, traditional chord symbols (I, IV, V, V7), analysis and arrangement of 
familiar melodies for solo and accompaniment. Advanced students may test out and receive credit. 

MUS 102 Structures of Music II (3) 

Prerequisite: MUS 101 or permission of instructor. This course is a continuation of MUS 101 and emphasis is 
placed on harmonization of diatonic modes, open and closed harmony, chord inversions, non chord 
tones, and diatonic 7th chords. The course also involves composing and arranging melodic, harmonic, 
and rhythmic patterns as related to blues, gospel, jazz, etc. 

MUS 103 Class Piano I (1) 

This course is designed as an introduction to playing the keyboard and fundamental keyboard techniques 
and is required for all majors except keyboard majors and students able to pass the keyboard proficiency 
test. 

MUS 104 Class Piano II (1) 

This course is a continuation of MUS 103 and is required for all majors except keyboard majors and 
students able to pass the keyboard proficiency test. 

MUS 111 Sightsinging/Eartraining I (2) 

The course is designed to improve the reading skills and pitch identification of the student. 

MUS 112 Sightsinging/Eartraining II (2) 

Prerequisite: MUS 111 or permission of instructor. The course is a continuation of MUS 111 and is designed 
to improve the reading skills and pitch identification of the student. 



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MUS 113 Applied Music (1) 

This course provides one credit hour of instruction in a major or minor instrument and is open to music 
and non-music majors. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 131 Applied Voice (2) 

This is the level one foundation course for the formal study of voice. 

MUS 132 Applied Voice II (2) 

This is the level two foundation course for the formal study of voice and is a continuation of MUS 131. 

MUS 133 Applied Keyboard (2) 

This is the level one foundation course for the formal study of keyboards. 

MUS 135 Applied Brasswind (2) 

This is the level one foundation course for the formal study of brasswind instruments. 

MUS 136 Applied Brasswind II (2) 

This is the level two foundation course for the formal study of brasswind instruments and is a 
continuation of MUS 135. 

MUS 137 Applied Keyboard II (2) 

This is the level two foundation course for the formal study of keyboards and is a continuation of MUS 
133. 

MUS 141 Concert Chorale (1) 

This course is designed primarily for students preparing to become choir directors and for non-majors 
with choral music experience. A cross-section of music representative of different eras and styles will be 
performed. Students 

will be introduced to wellness principles as an integral part of musicianship and acquire knowledge on 
the prevention of performance injuries. 

MUS 142 Concert Chorale II (1) 

This course is a continuation of MUS 141. 

MUS 145 Applied Woodwind (1) 

This is the level one foundation course for the formal study of woodwind instruments. 

MUS 146 Applied Woodwind II (2) 

This is the level two foundation course for the formal study of woodwind instruments and is a 
continuation of MUS 145. 

MUS 155 Applied Strings (2) 

This is the level one foundation course for the formal study of string instruments. 

MUS 156 Applied Strings II (2) 

This Is the level two foundation course for the formal study of string instruments and is a continuation of 
MUS 155. 

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MUS 161 Concert Band (1) 

This course is designed primarily for students preparing to become band/ orchestra directors and for non- 
majors with instrumental music experience. A cross-section of music representative of different eras and 
styles will be performed. Students will be introduced to wellness principles as an integral part of 
musicianship and acquire knowledge on the prevention of performance injuries. 

MUS 162 Concert Band (1) 

This course is a continuation of MUS 161. 

MUS 165 Applied Percussion I (2) 

This is the level one foundation course for the formal study of percussion instruments. 

MUS 166 Applied Percussion II (2) 

This is the level two foundation course for the formal study of percussion instruments and is a 
continuation of MUS 165. 

MUS 168 Applied Steel I (2) 

This is the level one foundation course for the formal study of steel pan instruments. 

MUS 169 Applied Steel II (2) 

This is the level two foundation course for the formal study of steel pan instruments and is a continuation 
of MUS 168. 

MUS 171 Jazz Band (1) 

This course is designed primarily for students preparing to become jazz band directors and for non- 
majors with jazz music experience. Emphasis is placed on sight-reading, performance and leadership 
skills. A cross-section of music representative of different eras and styles will be performed. Students will 
be introduced to wellness principles as an integral part of musicianship and acquire knowledge on the 
prevention of performance injuries. 

MUS 173 Jazz Band (1) 

This course is a continuation of MUS 171. 

MUS 181 Chamber Ensemble Pop (1) 

This course is designed primarily for students interested in vocal music for the stage. An audition is 
required. A cross-section of music representative of different eras and styles will be performed. Students 
will be introduced to wellness principles as an integral part of musicianship and acquire knowledge on 
the prevention of performance injuries. 

MUS 182 Chamber Ensemble POP II (1) 

This course is a continuation of MUS 181. 

MUS 185 Chamber Ensemble Steel (1) 

This course is designed primarily for students with experience or learning how to play the steel pan. A 
cross-section of music representative of different eras and styles will be performed. Students will be 
introduced to wellness principles as an integral part of musicianship and acquire knowledge on the 
prevention of performance injuries. 

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MUS 186 Chamber Ensemble Steel II (1) 

This course is a continuation of MUS 185. 

MUS 196 Music Production Workshop I (1) 

The course is a practicum exploration of the fundamentals of creating and staging musical theater/revues 
to include script/lyric writing, singing/instrumental development, movement/choreography, and 
management/promotion. Students will be introduced to wellness principles as an integral part of 
musicianship and acquire knowledge on the prevention of performance injuries. 

MUS 197 Music Production Workshop II (1) 

This course is a continuation of MUS 196. 

MUS 200 Music Appreciation (3) 

This course is an exposition of the philosophy, principals, and materials of music from the Baroque 
Period to contemporary period with illustrative examples from the Baroque Period, Classical Period, 
Romantic Period, Contemporary Classical Music and Popular Music. The course is designed to give the 
student an appreciation of music by exposing them to many musical styles, composers, historical trends, 
as well as increasing their aural, verbal and writing skills in describing music. 

MUS 201 Structures of Music III (3) 

Prerequisite: MUS 102 or permission of instructor. This course is a continuation of MUS 102 and emphasis is 
placed upon analyzing melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic patterns from eighteenth century, nineteenth 
century, and early twentieth century compositions. The course also involves composing and arranging 
melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic patterns as related to blues, gospel, jazz, etc. 

MUS 203 Structures of Music IV (Form and Analysis) (3) 

Prerequisite: MUS 201 or permission of instructor. This course prepares the student to be able to analyze the 
basic forms of composition using accepted practices from traditional and contemporary approaches. The 
student will be able to analyze and identify the following forms by the end of the course: phrase 
structure, binary form, ternary form, theme and variation, sonata form, rondo form, the concerto, the 
symphony, fugue form, blues forms and other jazz forms. The course involves listening and score study 
techniques. 

MUS 204 Class Piano III (1) 

This course is a continuation of MUS 104. 

MUS 205 Class Piano IV (1) 

This course is a continuation of MUS 204. 

MUS 207 Jazz Improvisation I (3) 

Prerequisite: MUS 102 or permission of instructor. Emphasis is placed upon the embellishment of improvised 
solos on chords, melodies, and rhythm. Chord progressions and related scales, patterns, cliches as they 
relate to creative improvisation will be explored, as well as the various stylistic approaches of jazz 
improvisation. 

MUS 208 Jazz Improvisation II (3) 

^requisite: MUS 201 or permission of instructor. Emphasis is placed upon the embellishment of improvised 
solos on chords, melodies, and rhythm. Chord progressions and related scales, patterns, cliches as they 

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relate to creative improvisation will be explored, as well as the various stylistic approaches of jazz 
improvisation. 

MUS 209 History of Music I - Western Music (3) 

This course is a survey of music of the European Diaspora and its influences from antiquity to the 
present. Emphasis is placed on societal, cultural and political influences on musicians, their music, and 
performance practices. 

MUS 210 History of Music II - African Diaspora (3) 

This course is a survey of music of the African Diaspora and its influences from antiquity to the present. 
Emphasis is placed on societal, cultural, and political influences on musicians, their music, and 
performance practices. 

MUS 221 History of Music III - World Music (3) 

This course is a survey of World Music with special focus on Asian music and its influences from 
antiquity to the present. Emphasis is placed on societal, cultural, and political influences on musicians, 
their music and performance 
practices. 

MUS 231 Applied Voice III (2) 

This is the level three foundation course for the formal study of voice and is a continuation of MUS 132. 

MUS 232 Applied Voice IV (2) 

This is the level four foundation course for the formal study of voice and is a continuation of MUS 231. 

MUS 233 Applied Keyboard III (2) 

This is the level three foundation course for the formal study of keyboards and is a continuation of MUS 
133. 

MUS 234 Applied Keyboard IV (2) 

This is the level four foundation course for the formal study of keyboards and is a continuation of MUS 

233. 

MUS 235 Applied Brasswind III (2) 

This is the level three foundation course for the formal study of brasswind instruments and is a 
continuation of MUS 135. 

MUS 236 Applied Brasswind IV (2) 

This is the level four foundation course for the formal study of brasswind instruments and is a 
continuation of MUS 235. 

MUS 238 Vocal Techniques (1) 

This course serves as an introduction to using the human voice as an instrument. Emphasis is placed 
upon voice production, projection, breathing, and techniques. 

MUS 241 Concert Chorale III (1) 

This course is a continuation of MUS 142. 

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MUS 242 Concert Chorale IV (1) 

This course is a continuation of MUS 241. 

MUS 243 Techniques/Brasswinds (1) 

This course serves as an introduction to playing brasswind instruments. Emphasis is placed upon tone 
production, projection, breathing, and techniques. 

MUS 245 Applied Woodwind III (2) 

This is the level three foundation course for the formal study of woodwind instruments and is a 
continuation of MUS 146. 

MUS 246 Applied Woodwind IV (2) 

This is the level four foundation course for the formal study of woodwind instruments and is a 
continuation of MUS 245. 

MUS 247 Techniques/Woodwinds (1) 

This course serves as an introduction to playing woodwind instalments. Emphasis is placed upon tone 
production, projection, breathing, and techniques. 

MUS 255 Applied Strings III (2) 

This is the level three foundation course for the formal study of string instruments and is a continuation 
of MUS 156. 

MUS 256 Applied Strings IV (2) 

This is the level four foundation course for the formal study of string instruments and is a continuation of 

MUS 255. 

MUS 257 Techniques/Strings (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course serves as an introduction to playing stringed instruments. Emphasis is placed upon tone 
production, projection, and techniques. 

MUS 261 Concert Band III (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 162. 

MUS 262 Concert Band IV (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 261. 

MUS 265 Applied Percussion III (2) F, Sp, Su 

This is the level three foundation course for the formal study of percussion instruments and is a 
continuation of MUS 166. 

MUS 266 Applied Percussion IV (2) F, Sp, Su 

This is the level four foundation course for the formal study of percussion instruments and is a 
continuation of MUS 265. 

MUS 267 Techniques/Percussion (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course serves as an introduction to playing percussion instruments. Emphasis is placed upon tone 
production, projection, and techniques. 

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MUS 268 Applied Steel III (2) F, Sp, Su 

This is the level three foundation course for the formal study of steel pan instruments and is a 
continuation of MUS 169. 

MUS 269 Applied Steel IV (2) F, Sp, Su 

This is the level four foundation course for the formal study of steel pan instruments and is a continuation 
of MUS 268. 

MUS 271 Jazz Band III (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 172. 

MUS 273 Jazz Band IV (1) 

This course is a continuation of MUS 271. 

MUS 281 Chamber Ensemble III (1) 

This course is a continuation of MUS 181. 

MUS 282 Chamber Ensemble Pop IV (1) 

This course is a continuation of MUS 281. 

MUS 285 Chamber Ensemble Steel III (1) 

This course is a continuation of MUS 186. 

MUS 286 Chamber Ensemble Steel IV (1) 

This course is a continuation of MUS 285. 

MUS 291 Music Criticism (3) F, Sp, Su 

The course is designed to prepare performing arts students to evaluate their preparation and 
performances. The course focuses on reviewing and writing performing arts reviews for the media. 

MUS 296 Music Production Workshop III (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 197. 

MUS 297 Music Production Workshop IV (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 296. 

MUS 300 Music Seminars/Recitals (0) F, Sp, Su 

This course, mandatory for all music majors, focuses on performance and recital techniques, master 

classes, and discussion of relevant issues with presentations by students, faculty and experts in the field. 

MUS 302 Composition/Arranging Vocal (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 203 or permission of instructor. The course uses standard and contemporary melodies for J 

vocal ensemble arrangements with and without instruments. The student will present at least fifteen 1 

minutes of music covering different styles and tempos to be performed by an ensemble. 

MUS 304 Piano Class - Accompanying (1) F, Sp, Su I 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This course is suggested for all keyboard principals and focuses on 
sight reading and score preparation for accompanists through the study of vocal and instrumental 

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literature. Students demonstrating competence in these skills will be assigned to a vocal or instrumental 
studio, or (by audition), an ensemble. 

MUS 305 Class Piano - Accompanying II (1) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Pennission of the instructor. This course is a continuation of MUS 304. 

MUS 306 Anthems, Spirituals and Hymns (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 203 or permission of instructor. The course is designed for the student to analyze, select, 
rehearse, and perform anthems hymns, and spirituals for different audiences and congregations. 

MUS 307 Spirituals & Lined Hymn Tunes (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course analyzes the use and practice of African American folk spirituals and lined hymn tunes in 
traditional and contemporary church services. 

MUS 311 Big Band Arranging (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 315 or permission of instructor. This course emphasizes the big band arrangement styles 
of the Count Basie Orchestra, The Duke Ellington Orchestra, Thad Jones, and others. Various jazz styles 
from swing to modern contemporary music will also be explored. Students are required to write and 
perform two big band arrangements for jazz ensemble. 

MUS 312 Conducting (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 203 or permission of instructor. This course serves as an introductory course to basic 
conducting patterns in simple, duple, and triple meters. Particular emphasis is placed on executing the 
anacrusis, fermata, and tempo changes. 

MUS 313 Conducting II (Choral) (1) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 203 or permission of instructor. This course is a continuation of MUS 312. Emphasis is 
placed on choral conducting technique. Left hand expression, vocal warm-ups, and choral rehearsal 
techniques are analyzed. Students study repertoire from the middle ages through contemporary times 
and learn scene reading techniques, complex meter and rhythmic devices. 

MUS 314 Conducting II (Instrumental) (1) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 203 or permission of instructor. This course is a continuation of MUS 312. Emphasis is 
placed on instrumental conducting technique. Left hand expression, orchestral and band warm-ups, and 
instrumental rehearsal techniques are analyzed. Orchestra/band repertoire from the Baroque Period 
through contemporary times is studied. Students learn score reading techniques arid complex meter and 
rhythmic devices. 

MUS 315 Small Ensemble Arranging (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 203 or permission of instructor. The course uses standard and contemporary melodies for 
small ensemble arrangements with and without vocals. The student will present at least fifteen minutes of 
music covering different styles and tempos to be performed by an ensemble. 

MUS 331 Applied Voice (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Four semesters of MUS 232 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the advanced level 
of training for the voice student. The course is designed to prepare the student for the senior recital, 
professional auditions, and graduate study. The voice major must enroll in and pass each of the four 
different levels of the course prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

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MUS 332 Applied Voice VI (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 331 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the second advanced level of 
training for the voice student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, 
and graduate study. The voice major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels prior to 
earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 333 Applied Keyboard (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 234 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the advanced level of training for the 
keyboard student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 
graduate study. The keyboard major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels prior to 
earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 334 Applied Keyboard VI (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 333 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the second advanced level of 
training for the keyboard student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional 
auditions, and graduate study. The keyboard major must enroll in and pass each of the four different 
levels prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 335 Applied Brasswind V (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 234 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the advanced level of training for the 
brasswind student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 
graduate study. The brasswind major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels prior to 
earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 336 Applied Brasswind VI (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 335 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the second advanced level of 
training for the brasswind student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional 
auditions, and graduate study. The brasswind major must enroll in and pass each of the four different 
levels prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 341 Concert Chorale V (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 242. 

MUS 342 Concert Chorale VII (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 141. 

MUS 345 Form and Analysis (3) F, Sp, Su 

The course prepares the student to analyze the basic forms of composition using accepted practices from 
traditional and contemporary approaches. 

MUS 348 Applied Woodwind V (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 246 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the first advanced level of training 
for the woodwind student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 
graduate study. The woodwind major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels prior to 
earning a passing grade for recital. 



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MUS 350 Applied Woodwind VI (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 246 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the second advanced level of 
training for the woodwind student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional 
auditions, and graduate study. The woodwind major must enroll in and pass each of the four different 
levels prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 355 Applied Strings V (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 256 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the first advanced level of training 
for the string student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 
graduate study. The string major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels of the course 
prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 356 Applied Strings VI (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 355 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the second advanced level of 
training for the string student. The course is designed to prepare the student for the senior recital, 
professional auditions, and graduate study. The string major must enroll in and pass each of the four 
different levels prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 361 Concert Band V (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 262. 

MUS 362 Concert Band VI (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 361. 

MUS 364 History of Jazz (3) F, Sp, Su 

Emphasis is placed on the importance of jazz and the representation of jazz from its early inception in the 
late 1899s to the late 1900s. The course promotes a critical analysis of the various styles and the most 
influential musicians and 
bands from early jazz, hard bop, cool jazz, avant-garde (free-jazz), and fusion. 

MUS 365 Applied Percussion V (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Four semesters of MUS 165 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the first advanced 
level of training for the percussion student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, 
professional auditions, and graduate study. The percussion major must enroll in and pass each of the 
four different levels of the course prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 366 Applied Percussion VI (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 365 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the second advanced level of 
training for the percussion student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional 
auditions, and graduate study. The percussion major must enroll in and pass each of the four different 
levels prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 367 Instrumental Methods (3) F, Sp, Su 

The course is designed as an introduction to the development, tone production, and fingering for 
brasswinds, woodwinds, strings, and percussions. 



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MUS 368 Applied Steel V (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 269 or -permission of instructor. This course serves as the first advanced level of training 
for the steel pan student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 
graduate study. The steel pan major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels of the course 
prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 369 Applied Steel VI (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 368 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the second advanced level of 
training for the steel pan student. The course is designed to prepare the student for the senior recital, 
professional auditions, and graduate study. The steel pan major must enroll in and pass each of the four 
different levels of the course prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 370 History of Popular Music (3) F, Sp, Su 

Emphasis is placed upon the history, styles, musicians, and sociological conditions of its development. 

MUS 371 Jazz Band V (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 272. 

MUS 372 Jazz Band VI (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 371. 

MUS 381 Chamber Music Pop V (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 282. 

MUS 382 Chamber Music Pop VI (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 381 

MUS 385 Chamber Ensemble Steel V (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 286. 

MUS 386 Chamber Ensemble Steel VI(1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 385. 

MUS 394 Jazz Improvisation & Arranging (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: MUS 207, 208 or permission of instructor. The course is centered around the study and 
application of various styles of improvisation and arrangement for jazz and its progenitors with emphasis 
on composing and arranging while performing and writing or recording hard copy. Basic melodic, 
harmonic and rhythmic patterns and Greek scales will be performed. 

MUS 396 Music Production Workshop V (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 297. 

MUS 397 Music Production Workshop VI (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 396. 

MUS 431 Applied Voice VII (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 332 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the third advanced level of training 
for the voice student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 

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graduate study. The voice major must enroll in and pass each of the tour different levels of the course 
prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 432 Applied Voice VIII (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 431 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the fourth advanced level of training 
for the voice student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 
graduate study. The voice major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels of the course 
prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 433 Applied Keyboard VII (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 334 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the third advanced level of training 
for the keyboard student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 
graduate study. The keyboard major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels of the course 
prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 434 Applied Keyboard VIII (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 433 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the fourth advanced level of training 
for the keyboard student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 
graduate study. The keyboard major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels of the course 
prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 435 Applied Brasswind VII (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 336 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the third advanced level of training 
for the brasswind student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 
graduate study. The brasswind major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels of the 
course prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 436 Applied Brasswind VIII (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 435 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the fourth advanced level of training 
for the brasswind student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 
graduate study. The brasswind major must enroll in arid pass each of the four different levels of the 
course prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 441 Concert Chorale VIII (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 342. 

MUS 442 Concert Chorale VIII (1) F, Sp, Su 

Tliis course is a continuation of MUS 441. 

MUS 444 Instrumental Methods - Steelpan Making & Tuning (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This course is designed to give the student hands-on experience in 
making and tuning instruments of the steel orchestra. 

MUS 447 Applied Woodwind VII (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 350 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the third advanced level of training 
for the woodwind student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 
graduate study. The woodwind major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels of the 
course prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

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MUS 449 Applied Woodwind VIII (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 447 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the fourth advanced level of training 
for the woodwind student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 
graduate study. The woodwind major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels of the 
course prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 453 Introduction to Church Music (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course defines the development of authentic religious music practices and genres, influences from 
various traditional and non-traditional church denominations and institutions. It examines the history 
and policies of church denominations as related to the roles and functions of church musicians and music 
ministry management. 

MUS 455 Applied Strings VII (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 356 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the third advanced level of training 
for the string student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 
graduate study. The string major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels of the course 
prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 456 Applied Strings VIII (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 455 or pennission of instructor. This course serves as the fourth advanced level of training 
for the string student. The course is designed to prepare the student for the senior recital, professional 
auditions, and graduate study. The string major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels 
prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 461 Concert Band (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 362. 

MUS 462 Concert Band (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 461. 

MUS 465 Applied Percussion VII (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 366 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the third advanced level of training 
for the percussion student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 
graduate study. The percussion major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels of the 
course prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 466 Applied Percussion VIII (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 465 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the fourth advanced level of training 
for the percussion student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 
graduate study. The percussion major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels of the 
course prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 468 Applied Steel VII (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 369 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the third advanced level of training 
for the steel pan student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 
graduate study. The steel pan major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels of the course 
prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

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MUS 469 Applied Steel VIII (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUS 468 or permission of instructor. This course serves as the fourth advanced level of training 
for the steel pan student. The course prepares students for the senior recital, professional auditions, and 
graduate study. The steel pan major must enroll in and pass each of the four different levels of the course 
prior to earning a passing grade for recital. 

MUS 471 Jazz Band VII (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 372. 

MUS 472 Jazz Band VIII (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 471 

MUS 474 Foundations of Music Education (3) F, Sp, Su F, Sp, Su 

The course defines the historical, psychological, and sociological developments of music education. 

MUS 481 Chamber Music Pop VII (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 382. 

MUS 482 Chamber Ensemble Pop VIII (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 481. 

MUS 485 Chamber Ensemble Steel VII (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 386. 

MUS 486 Chamber Ensemble Steel VIII (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 485. 

MUS 487 Applied Music Recital (1) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Permission of faculty. This course represents a culmination of systematic training in voice or an 
instrument. It is required for all graduating Bachelor of Music students or it may be exempted by faculty 
upon presentation of documentation of successful performances at the professional level. 

MUS 491 Business of Music (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course prepares the student to understand and function as a professional artist in dealing with 
contracts, copyrights, negotiations, management, recordings, agents, etc. 

MUS 492 Emotion and Music (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course presents examples of the way music has been used throughout history, as well as in the 
present, as a vehicle for modifying the listener's responses. It presents an understanding of ways to 
perform for different audiences. 

MUS 493 Major Applied Research Project I (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course gives the student the opportunity to incorporate professional experiences through a 
documented format. 

MUS 494 Music Internship (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course is designed for the student to gain practical experience in the performing arts field of his or 
her choice. 

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MUS 496 Music Production Workshop VII (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 397. 

MUS 497 Music Production Workshop VIII (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 496. 

MUS 498 Major Applied Research Project II (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a continuation of MUS 493 and gives the student the opportunity to incorporate 
professional experiences through a documented format. 

MUS 499 Comparative European Languages (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course is designed to introduce the student to basic pronunciation and definition of musical terms 
and lyrics in French, German, and Italian. 

Music Business 

MUB 301 Introduction to Music Business (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course presents the history and development of the music industry, focusing upon contemporary 
theory and practice. 

MUB 311 Computers and Music (3) F, Sp, Su 

Introduction to basic computing skill for the musician, exploring Musical instrument Digital Interface 
(MIDI) as a tool in the marketplace. The course includes: Basic acoustics theory, Midi Sequencing using 
two of the leading software ( Sonar 4.0), Music notation (Finale 2007). 

MUB 312 MIDI Techniques (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUB 311 or permission of the instructor. Composing, editing, mixing using various MIDI 
controllers, MIDI sequencer programs and "soft" synthesizers in "Reason 3". 

MUB 313 MIDI Techniques (Lab) (1) F, Sp, Su 

This course should he taken together with MUB 312. An introduction to the latest software and hardware 
technologies. 

MUB 314 MIDI/Digital Audio Work Stations (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUB 312 or permission of instructor. The course covers the fundamentals and practical 
applications of a digital audio system, as well as methods for functioning in an integrated MIDI/Digital 
Audio Workstation (DAW)/Analog studio environment. Course topics include system set up and 
interconnections; MIDI interface and synchronization; aspects of digital recording consoles/mixers, such 
as paged architecture, I/O, word clock, sample rate, and bit depth); and basics of a DAW, such as the 
elements of hard-disk recording, track and file management, digital audio, and sequencing strategies. 

MUB 315 Music Production with Pro Tools and Reason (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MUB 314. This course provides the student with the essential knowledge of recording, editing 
and mixing projects in the environment of the leading software programs today Pro Tools 7 and Reason 
3.0 using Rewire technology. The student will learn practical applications that go beyond remix 
production, and you'll develop a diverse skill set that will help you to better understand mixing, editing, 
and producing original material. 

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MUB 331 Music Copyright and Publishing (3) F, Sp, Su 

The course is a study of the national and international protection of intellectual property through laws 
such as the 1976 Copyright Act. National and international publishing and licensing agreements are 
examined. 

Philosophy 

PHI 200 Aesthetics (3) 

Aesthetics (also spelled esthetics) is a branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of beauty, art, and 
taste, and with the creation and appreciation of beauty. It is more scientifically defined as the study of 
sensory or sensori-emotional values, sometimes called judgments of sentiment and taste. 

PHI 301 Introduction to Western Philosophy (3) 

Western philosophy is the philosophical thought and work of the Western or Occidental world, as 
distinct from Eastern or Oriental philosophies and the varieties of indigenous philosophies. Historically, 
the term was recently invented to refer to the philosophical thinking of Western civilization, beginning 
with Greek philosophy in ancient Greece, and eventually covering a large area of the globe, including 
North America and Australia. We will survey the two main traditions of contemporary philosophy: 
analytic philosophy and continental philosophy 

PHI 302 Introduction to Eastern Philosophy (3) 

Eastern philosophy includes the various philosophies of Asia, including Indian philosophy, Chinese 
philosophy, Iranian philosophy, Japanese philosophy and Korean philosophy. Central to our focus will 
be the thought of Confucius, Mencius, Tao Tzu, and the Buddha. 

PHI 311 History of Ancient Western Philosophy (3) 

In Western philosophy, the spread of Christianity through the Roman Empire marked the end of 
Hellenistic philosophy and ushered in the beginnings of Medieval philosophy. We will begin with the 
pre-Socratic philosophers, journey through Socrates, Plato and Aristotle, and end just short of Rene' 
Descartes and the Enlightenment (This course is a requirement for PHI 312 and has the prerequisite of 
REL201). 

PHI 312 History of Western Philosophy (3) 

History of Western Philosophy is an extension of PHI 311. We begin with Rene' Descartes and the 
Enlightenment, travel through the sentimentalists and the social contract theorists of analytic philosophy 
and end with American pragmatism and the deconstruction and phenomenology of continental 
philosophy. (Prerequisites: REL 201, PHI 312). 

PHI 321 Philosophy of Art (3) 

This course builds upon PHI 200. It has a tighter focus on art than the broader aesthetics course, and can 
well be called the art epistemology, i.e., how do we know art and what art is. There seems to be 
something deeply metaphysical about art as well, for it has the capacity to communicate emotions and is 
a major conduit for religion. As they say, "This piece of art speaks to me," but how does this work? 
(Prerequisites: REL 201, PHI 200). 

PHI 331 Contemporary Ethics (3) 

This course surveys our modern views on ethics. We begin with an analysis of G.E.M. Anscombe's essay 
on "Modern Moral Philosophy." From there we derive the mechanics of deontological (primarily 

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Kantianism) and teleological ethics (namely consequentialism and utilitarianism). These theories will 
logically and historically give rise to the re-hirth of virtue ethics and its sentimentalist empathy and care 
derivatives. (Prerequisite: REL 201) 

PHI 341 Logic (3) 

Logic is the study of arguments. Logic is used in most intellectual activities, but is studied primarily in 
the disciplines of philosophy, mathematics, and computer science. Logic examines general forms which 
arguments may take, which forms are valid, and which are fallacies. It is one kind of critical thinking. In 
philosophy, the study of logic falls in the area of epistemology, which asks: "How do we know what we 
know?" In mathematics, it is the study of valid inferences within some formal language. This course 
surveys propositional and predicate logic. 

PHI 411 Philosophy of Education (3) 

Philosophy of education is a field of applied philosophy, drawing from the traditional fields of 
philosophy (ontology, ethics, epistemology, etc.) and its approaches (speculative philosophy, prescriptive, 
and/or analytic) to address questions regarding education policy, human development, and curriculum 
theory, to name a few. We will study what constitutes upbringing and education, the values and norms 
revealed through upbringing and educational practices, the limits and legitimization of education as an 
academic discipline, and the relation between educational theory and practice. We will have as our 
primary thinkers will be James Fowler and Nel Noddings. 

PHI 421 Philosophy of Humanities (3) 

This is not simply a course on the humanities; this is a philosophy course. Therefore it deals with the 
philosophical and meta questions of the humanities. The humanities are academic disciplines that study 
the human condition, using methods that are primarily analytic, critical, or speculative, as distinguished 
from the mainly empirical approaches of the natural and social sciences. Examples of the disciplines of 
the humanities are ancient and modern languages, literature, law, history, philosophy, religion, and 
visual and performing arts (including music). 

PHI 431 Philosophy of Science (3) 

The philosophy of science is concerned with the assumptions, foundations, methods and implications of 
science. In addition to these central problems for science as a whole, many philosophers of science 
consider these problems as they apply to particular sciences (e.g. philosophy of biology or philosophy of 
physics). Some philosophers of science also use contemporary results in science to draw philosophical 
morals. 

PHI 441 Philosophy of the Social Sciences (3) 

The philosophy of social science is the study of the logic and method of the social sciences, such as 
sociology, anthropology and political science. Philosophers of social science are concerned with the 
differences and similarities between the social and the natural sciences, causal relationships between 
social phenomena, the possible existence of social laws, and the ontological significance of structure and 
agency 

PHI 491 Phenomenology (3) 

Phenomenology is a philosophical movement. It was founded in the early years of the 20th century by 
Edmund Husserl, expanded together with a circle of his followers at the universities of Gottingen and 
Munich in Germany, and spread across to France, the United States, and elsewhere, often in contexts far 
removed from Husserl's early work. Phenomenology, in Husserl's conception, is primarily concerned 

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with the systematic reflection on and analysis of the structures of consciousness, and the phenomena 
which appear in acts of consciousness. Such reflection was to take place from a highly modified "first 
person" viewpoint, studying phenomena not as they appear to "my" consciousness, but to any 
consciousness whatsoever. 

Physical Education 

PED 110 Dimensions of Wellness (2) F, Sp, Su 

This required course is designed to introduce students to the physical, emotional, intellectual, social, 
spiritual, occupational, and environmental dimensions of wellness. Elements of this course will assist 
students in acquiring the realization that their present and future health/wellness depends on how they 
live and the choices they make throughout life. 

PED 210 Swimming (1) F, Su 

This course provides basic instruction in the skills and knowledge of swimming. Elements of the course 
include crawl, back crawl, sidestroke, breaststroke, swimming and diving techniques. 

PED 212 Advanced Swimming (1) F, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of PED 210. This course provides basic instruction in the development of 
the principal strokes, water skills, and methods of self-preservation. 

PED 213 Safety and First Aid (2) F, Sp, Su 

This course is a comprehensive study in the various areas of general safety education in the total school 
program, home, and community. It is designed to acquaint students with appropriate first aid techniques 
used in accidents and injuries. 

PED 301 Historical and Philosophical Foundation of Sports and Physical Education (3) F 

Prerequisite: PED 210, 212, 316. This course is designed for the contemporary undergraduate physical 
education and kinesiology student and will acquaint the student with the history and philosophy of sport 
and physical education. It provides materials that could bridge the gap between experience and research 
in the sub-disciplines of sport history and sport philosophy. In doing so, it may increase the knowledge in 
the philosophical systems that emphasize holistic thought in a hierarchy of mind over body and help 
students understand the historical and contemporary nature and demands of professional occupations in 
physical education. 

PED 308 Movement Skills, Ryhtm and Dance (2) F 

Prerequisite PED 110, 210, 212. This course teaches skill development, knowledge and performance of 
basic dance patterns, basic movement and leadership techniques in dance and rhythmic activities, 
creative movement, folk, and social dance. This course also offers students experiences in performing, 
analyzing and leadership rhythmic aid dance activities utilizing a wide range of rhythmic opportunities. 
It is a means for students and dance activities utilizing a wide range of rhythmic opportunities. It is a 
means for students to construct/add to their knowledge base of the need for rhythmic activity and 

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understanding in education as a means for skill development, kinesthetic awareness, and enhancement of 
self image. 

PED 311 History and Principles of Physical Education (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 200 level PED courses. Principles of modern physical education 
programs including the history related to the present day program. 

PED 312 Introduction to Sports Philosophy (3) Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 200 level PED courses. An introductory course dealing with the 
philosophy of Physical Education as applied to athletics, and community recreation. 

PED 314 Social and Community Health (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 200 level PED courses. A study of the social aspects of community 
problems. Attention will be given to contemporary problems including alcohol, tobacco, substance abuse 
and communicable diseases. 

PED 315 Play and Community Recreation (2) F 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 200 level PED courses. Recreational activities, especially games of low 
organization, nature and outings, activities, drama, arts and crafts. 

PED 316 Theory of Coaching and Officiating (3) F 

Prerequisite PED 110,210, 212. Tine purpose of this course is to provide students with learning experiences 
that will lead to the development of basic skills in team sports. In addition to skill acquisition, the course 
will focus on how to plan and implement the four stages of skill development in games through the use 
of extending, refining, and application tasks. An emphasis will be placed on developing lesson plans, 
teaching proper technique, developing a basic understanding of the fundamental skills, game strategy, 
and the enhancement of performance skills. Students will be expected to achieve an intermediate level of 
skill in the selected team sports. Practice outside of class time and individual tutoring may be necessary 
for some students to achieve the expected performance level. 

PED 322 Theory of Coaching and Officiating (3) F 

Prerequisites: PED 301,0323. A study of events for students who plan to officiate, coach, score, and analyze 
play situation. Intramural games will provide the necessary laboratory for this analysis. 

PED 323 Individual Group Activities (2) F 

Prerequisites: PED 301, 316. Demonstration and techniques in individual and group and activities with an 
analysis of the skills, practice drills, and progression in activities. 

PED 401 Organization and Administration of Physical Education Programs (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: PED 403, 410. Organization and administration of physical education, highlighting the 
relationship to other functions of the school and athletics. 

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PED 403 Adaptive and Corrective Physical Education (3) Sp 

Prerequisites: PED 308, 410. This course gives students first hand information and contact with children 
with special needs. Adapted physical education is an individualized program of developmental activities, 
exercises, games, rhythms, and sport designed to meet the unique physical education needs of disabled 
individuals. Therefore, this course aids students in adequately planning, organizing, administering, and 
evaluating an adapted individualized and group physical education program for the disabled. 

PED 407 Exercise Physiology (3) Sp 

Prerequisites: PED 401, 403. Designed to study the changes in various body mechanisms that occur during 
exercise including long-term effects of systemic physical training. 

PED 408 Kinesiology (3) F 

Prerequisites: PED 407, 409, EDU 412. A comprehensive study of the body and its movements. 

PED 410 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries (3) Sp 

Prerequisites: PED 308, 322. The prevention and care of athletic injuries including advanced techniques in 
taping, wrapping, and the use of therapeutic modalities. 

PED 411 Psychomotor Learning (3) F 

Prerequisite: EDU 402. A study of muscular activity associated with the mental processes in the acquisition 
of skills. 

PED 499 Independent Study in Physical Education (3) F, Sp, S 

Prerequisites: Completion of General Core Courses. This course provides independent direction and 
supervision of a special topic in Physical Education under the supervision of a physical education 
instructor. 

PED 499 Independent Study in Physical Education K-12 (3) 

Prerequisite: Completion of General Core Courses. This course provides independent direction and 
supervision of a special topic in a specific area of Physical Education under the supervision of an 
education instructor. 

Physical Science 

PSC 101 Physical Science (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of MAT 110. This course is for non-science majors only. It provides a brief 
overview of the major theories and problems in physics, chemistry, earth science, and astronomy. Topics 
include elementary mechanics, scientific notation, measurement, atomic structure, energy, 
electromagnetism, geology, meteorology, and the solar system. 



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Physics 

AST 200 Stellar Astronomy (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MAT 111. This course covers general principles of Astronomy: structure and evolution of 
stars, stellar systems, galaxies and the universe. Neutron stars and black holes, galactic distances and the 
expansion of the universe. 

PHY 140 General Physics I (3) F, Sp, 

This remedial physics course is a non calculus-based introductory physics course sequence designed and 
intended for freshmen students majoring in physics / engineering and who did not take physics at high 
school. The course covers fundamental concepts of mechanics, forces and equilibrium motion of a particle 
in one and two dimensions, laws of motion, work and energy, momentum, collisions in one dimension, 
circular motion, motion of fluids, heat, kinetics, laws of thermodynamics, wave motion and sound. 

PHY 141 General Physics I Lab (1) F, Sp 

This entails laboratory courses to accompany PHY140 General Physics I and consisting of experiments in 
fundamental mechanics, thermodynamics and waves. 

PHY142 General Physics II ( 3) F, Sp 

Co-requisite: PHY 143. This is a continuation of PHY 140 covering Electric fields and forces, Gauss' Law, 
electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, current and resistance, direct current circuitry, magnetic 
fields and their sources, Faraday's Law, inductance and alternating current circuits, geometric optics, and 
physical optics. 

PHY143 General Physics II Lab (1) F, Sp 

Co-requisite PHY142. General Physics II consists of experiments in Electromagnetics and Optics. 

PHY 200 College Physics I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MAT 111 Co-requisite: PHY 201. This course covers fundamental concepts of mechanics, 
forces and equilibrium; motion of a particle in one and two dimensions, laws of motion, work and 
energy, momentum, collisions in one dimension, circular motion, motion of fluids, heat, kinetics, laws of 
thermodynamics, wave motion and sound. 

PHY 201 College Physics I Laboratory (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: PHY 200. Experiments include laws of linear motion and collisions, extended circular 
motion, mechanical equivalent of heat, diffraction, polarization, analysis of spectral lines, propagation, 
reflection, and refraction of light, propagation of heat and expansion of materials. 

PHY 202 College Physics II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 200 and 201 Co-requisite: PHY 203. This is a continuation of PHY 201 covering electric 
fields and forces, Gauss' Law, electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, current and resistance, direct 
current circuitry, magnetic fields and their sources, Faraday's Law, inductance and alternating current 
circuits, geometric optics, and optical spectra and atomic structure, natural radioactivity and nuclear 
disintegration. 

PHY 203 College Physics II Laboratory (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: PHY 202. Experiments include: induction; electric circuits; Ohm's Law; dependence of 
resistance on length; area, and temperature; parallel and series connection of resistors; motors; 

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electromagnetism and induction; characteristics of parallel plate capacitor; motion of charges in magnetic 
fields; and deflection of an electron beam by homogeneous magnetic fields. 

PHY 250 Physics with Calculus I (4) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: MAT 202 Co-requisite: PHY 251. This course covers the principles of classical mechanics using 
the techniques of the calculus— vectors, laws of circular motion, work/energy conservation laws, linear 
and angular momentum, rotation of rigid bodies, oscillatory motion, the laws of thermodynamics, and 
the kinetic theory of gases. 

PHY 251 Physics with Calculus I Laboratory (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: PHY 250. Experiments include error estimation, laws of linear motion and collision; extended 
circular motion; mechanical equivalent of heat; diffraction; polarization; analysis of spectral lines; 
propagation, reflection, and refraction of light; transfer of heat, and expansion of materials using calculus. 

PHY 252 Physics with Calculus II (4) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 250, PHY 251. Co-requisite: PHY 253. This course covers electric fields and forces, 
Gauss' Law, electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, current and resistance, direct current circuitry, 
magnetic fields and their sources, Faraday's Law, inductance and alternating current circuits, geometric 
optics, and physical optics using the calculus techniques. 

PHY 253 Physics with Calculus II Laboratory (1) F, Sp, Su 

Co-requisite: PHY 252. Experiments include induction; electric circuits; Ohm's Law; dependence of 
resistance on length, area, and temperature; parallel and series connection of resistors; motors; 
electromagnetism and induction; characteristics of parallel plate capacitors; motion of charges in a 
magnetic field; and deflection of an electron beam by homogeneous magnetic fields. 

PHY 310 Modern Physics I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 252, PHY 253. Co-requisite: PHY 311. Recent developments in physics are discussed. 
Subject matter includes review of classical physics, special relativity, four-vectors, wave-particle duality, 
the hydrogen atom, many electron atoms, nuclear instrumentation, nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, 
elementary particles, introduction to quantum mechanics, and solid state physics. 

PHY 311 Modern Physics I lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

This entails laboratory courses to accompany Modern Physics I, consisting of experiments in atomic and 
nuclear physics. 

PHY 312 Modern Physics II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 310, PHY 311. Co-requisite: PHY 313. Continuation of PHY 310 Modern Physics I . This 
course consists of classical physics, special relativity, four-vectors, wave-particle duality, the hydrogen 
atom, many electron atoms, nuclear instrumentation, nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, elementary 
particles, introduction to quantum mechanics, and solid state physics. 

PHY 313 Modern Physics II Lab (1) F, Sp, Su 

This entails laboratory courses to accompany Modern Physics II, consisting of experiments in atomic and 
nuclear physics. 



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PHY 318 Optics (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 312, PHY 313. This course covers geometrical optics and interaction of light with 
matter. 

PHY 320 Thermodynamics (3) F, Sp , Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 312 Modern Physics II. Fundamental principles of thermodynamics, the first, second, 
and third laws, free energy, entropy, the chemical potential, phase rule and its applications. 

PHY 410 Mechanics I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 252 Physics w/Cal. I. Laws of motion, static's of particles and rigid bodies, motion of 
particles in one, two, and three dimensions, systems of particles, rigid bodies in a plane, central forces. 
Accelerated reference systems, rigid body in three dimensions, generalized coordinates. 

PHY 411 Mechanics II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 411 Mechanics U. This course consists of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of 
mechanics, vibrating systems, and normal coordinates. 

PHY 440 Electromagnetism I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 411 Mechanics II. The theory of electromagnetic fields and waves is developed from 
basic principles. Vector calculus, Coulomb's law, Gauss's Law, electrostatic potential, dielectrics, 
solutions to Laplace's and Poisson's equations, magnetic induction. 

PHY 441 Electromagnetism II (3) F, Sp , Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 440 Electromagnetism I. Vector potential, magnetic materials, Maxwell's equations, 
and propagation of waves in space and various media are discussed. 

PHY 460 Quantum Mechanics I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 441 Electromagnetism II. A comprehensive introduction to quantum mechanics with 
wave mechanics applied to standard one dimensional problems and the hydrogen atom. 

PHY 461 Quantum Mechanics II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 460 Quantum Mechanics I. A comprehensive analysis of general matrix formalism; 
angular momentum, symmetries, perturbation theory and variation methods. Also an introduction to 
relativistic theory and theory of fields. 

PHY 462 Statistical Physics (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 461 Quantum Mechanics II. General probabilistic theory, classical and quantum statistics 
of equilibrium and non-equilibrium states are discussed. 

PHY 463 Solid State Physics(3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 462 Statistical Physics. An investigation of crystalline form of solids, lattice dynamics, 
metals, insulators, semiconductors, crystalline surfaces, and amorphous materials. 

PHY 465 Semiconductor Physics (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 463 Solid State Physics. Introduction to semiconductor physics with some of the latest 
theories and developments. 



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PHY 470 Senior Physics Lab (2) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 461 Quantum Mechanics II. Advanced laboratory topics are treated. Modern physics 
laboratory equipment is used and the student is introduced to current laboratory practice. 

PHY 480 Senior Research (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 470 Senior Physics Lab. Students perform original investigation in theoretical or 
experimental physics under direct faculty supervision. 

PHY 481 Seminar in Physics(l) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 480 Senior Project Senior Researcli. This entails a series of specialized lectures/seminars 
on selected topics in Physics. 

PHY 490 Mathematical Physics I (3) F, Sp , Su 

Prerequisites: MAT 401. Mathematical physics covers variation principles, complex variables, partial 
differential equations, integral equations, and transforms. 

PHY 491 Mathematical Physics II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 490. Additional mathematical methods for physicists: Perturbation methods, Laplace's 

and 

Poisson's Equations, waves, special functions, vector fields, vector waves. 

PHY 495 Laser Physics (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: NSC 453 Senior Project. This course consists of principles of lasers and laser applications, 
including atom-field interactions, stimulated emission and dipole oscillators, optical resonators and 
electromagnetic modes, semi-classical and quantum laser theory, and specific laser systems. 

PHY 497 Special Relativity (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 491 Mathematical Physics II. A detailed study of special relativity: Lorentz 
transformations relativistic electrodynamics. 

PHY 498 General Relativity (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: PHY 491 Mathematical Physics II. General relativity through differential geometry and tensor 
analysis. Field equations and their solutions and applications are studied. 

Political Science 

POL 301 U.S. Government (3) F, Su 

A survey of the structure, function, theory and practices of the United States government. 

POL 302 State and Local Government (3) Sp, Su 

A study of state and local government in America with emphasis on principles, functions and 
administration of state, county and local government. 

POL 311 Comparative Government (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: POL 301. A comparative study of the backgrounds, institutions, and policies of the United 
States, England, France, the Soviet Union and Sweden. 



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POL 330 International Politics (3) F 

Prerequisite: POL 301. A study of geographic political, economic and ideological factors which influence 
the behavior of nations. 

POL 331 Politics of Black Americans (3) Sp 

An analysis of the political behavior of Black Americans and the issues which affect them. 

POL 333 Politics of Governmental Finance (3) F 

Prerequisite: POL 301. An assessment of politics, planning and administration of governmental budgets. 

POL 334 Public Personnel Administration (3) Sp 

Focuses upon the theory, practice and organization of public personnel training, classification, 
compensation, promotion and human relations. 

POL 337 Public Policy Analysis (3) Sp 

A study of the forces shaping public policy and the consequence of policy design, public bureaucracy and 
their programs and decision making. 

POL 338 Administration of Social Services (3) F, Su 

Designed to enable one to understand the process of planning and administering basic social services, 
including housing, recreation, health care, policy and welfare. 

POL 340 Third World Politics (3) F 

An analysis of selected political systems in Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean and Asia. 

POL 403 Management of Federal Government (3) Sp 

An investigation of the executive, legislative and judicial branches of government. 

POL 407 Constitutional Law I (3) F, Sp 

This course takes a look at the development and philosophies of constitutions. Emphasis is placed on the 
role, interpretations, and procedures of the Constitution of the United States of America. 

POL 408 Constitutional Law II (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite: POL 407. This course is a continuation of Constitutional Law I and examines the 
interpretations and amendments of the Constitution. An exploration of constitutional limitations and 
guarantees is included. 

POL 430 Research in Political Science (3) F, Su 

This course deals with principles and techniques of research in political science. 

POL 436 Political Theory (3) Sp, Su 

Political thought and writings from Greek antiquity to modern times. Emphasis is placed on the leading 
political figures. 

POL 438 International Law and Organization (3) Sp, Su 

Using the United Nations and the International Public Sector as a backdrop for this course, issues such as 
peacekeeping, trade, and social and humanitarian efforts are covered. This course also examines why 
states act through formal international organizations such as the United Nations as well as informal non- 
governmental organizations (NGOs) such as multinational corporations. 

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POL 490 Field Placement I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Supervised field work with a governmental or other public affairs oriented organization. 

POL 491 Field Placement II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: POL 490. A continuation of field placement I with supervised field work in a governmental or 
other public affairs agency. 

POR 301 - Portfolio Seminar (3) F, Sp 

In this intensive writing course, students document their prior learning experience, gain understanding 
of the policies and practices of recognition of prior learning, and then apply for prior learning credit. The 
course introduces students to the techniques of preparing a portfolio that clearly identifies college level 
learning, while guiding students in structuring their materials to provide sufficient supporting 
information and documentation for the faculty to use as a basis for evaluation. 

POR 302 Portfolio Review (3) F,Sp 

This is an intensive writing course required for all students working towards completion of the CLEO 
Portfolio. This required course is for students whose preliminary portfolio has been accepted. Students 
have until the end of the semester of enrollment in POR 302 to present the final portfolio for the CLEO 
Committee's evaluation toward awarding of college level credit. Applicable credits are not awarded until 
the Portfolio has been evaluated and approved by the CLEO Committee. Pre-requisite: POR 301 - 
Portfolio Seminar and approval by CLEO Director. 

Psychology 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology (3) F, Sp, Su 

This is an intensive reading course. The course is an introduction to psychological terms, facts, and 

principles and is designed to aid students in understanding themselves and others. Behavior is analyzed 

and interpreted through 

a discussion of such topics as growth and development in infancy, childhood, adolescence, and 

adulthood; states of awareness; learning and thinking; motivation and emotion; mental health; and social 

behavior. 

PSY 300 Foundations of Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3) 

This course is designed to introduce students to the science and practice of psychology in organizations. 
The course will examine the effects of employee attitudes, behavior, cognitions, emotions, and personality 
on worker satisfaction 
and performance. 

PSY 301 Psychopathology (3) F 

The study of various abnormal phases of behavior, prevention and treatment of certain social-emotional 
problems, examination of recent clinical and experimental findings. 

PSY 302 Clinical Psychology (3) Sp 

The history and current status of clinical psychology, professional ethics and interpersonal concerns, 
clinical assessment and prediction, theory and practice of behavior change. 

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PSY 303 Experimental Psychology (3) F 

This course deals with selected laboratory experiments and demonstrations, lectures, collateral readings 
in methods and results of psychological experimentation. 

PSY 304 Physiological Psychology (3) Su 

An investigation of basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology followed by an introduction to the 
physiological basis of sensation, arousal, motivation, memory, and learning. 

PSY 306 Developmental Psychology (3) F 

The study of the development of personality, intelligence, and motivation from childhood to adulthood. 
The role of social learning in the developmental process will be investigated. 

PSY 307 History and Systems of Psychology (3) Sp, Su 

A study of the development of psychology as a body of science and the historical background of 
psychology. 

PSY 308 Personality Theory (3) Sp, Su 

An examination of the place of personality theory in various approaches or the fields of personality. 
Studies include the structures, determinants, dynamics and developmental characteristics of personality. 

PSY 309 Research Methods (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course provides an overview of various research methods vised in psychology and other social and 
behavioral sciences. Emphasis is placed on the logic of social inquiry, problems of research design and 
execution, and qualitative 

and quantitative analyses. Students will be guided through a research proposal that may be used in the 
development of their senior project. 

PSY 310 Community Psychology (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course gives students a basic understanding of the content, approach, and philosophy that 
characterize community psychology. The focus is on the importance of and strategies for producing social 
change and for treating community problems with prevention oriented community psychology 
interventions. Organized around community settings, such as the educational system, the criminal justice 
system, social service system, and mental health system, the course aids students in understanding that 
principles of prevention and empowerment can be transferred from one community arena to another. A 
central concept in this course is the idea that setting or environment is as important as the individual(s) in 
it and that many academic disciplines and counseling methods can offer solutions to psychological 
problems found in the community. 

PSY 312 Introduction to Statistics (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of MAT 102 or a higher level math course. This course is designed to 
introduce students to the basic concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics and to build a 
groundwork for better understanding of social science data and statistics commonly used in social 
research. Emphasis will be placed on practical application of statistical theories and techniques applicable 
to social sciences, the use of statistical computer software, and the interpretation and production of 
statistical tables and charts. Measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, tests of significance, 
and correlation are covered. 



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PSY 316 Psychology of Culture (3) F 

An introduction to the influence of cultural factors that serve as independent variables in the dynamic 
process of human behavior, development and interpersonal exchange. A major focus will be African 
American, Asian American, Hispanic American and Native American cultures. 

PSY 317 Psychology of the African Diaspora (3) Sp 

This course examines the psychological dimensions of the African American experience as it occurs 
within the conceptual framework of the African Diaspora. Topics to be covered include African culture 
and consciousness before the coming of the Europeans, the psychological impact of slavery, the 
psychology of resistance to domination, the psychology of creolization, the psychology of religion, the 
African American family, the psycho-spiritual development of African American people, identity and 
psychological health and healing. 

PSY 401 Advanced Statistics (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: PSY 312 or SSC 302. Further study of quantitative methods including correlation, chi-square, 
contingency and analysis of variance. This course is designed for students who have completed a basic 
statistic course and desire a greater understanding of social science data and statistics commonly used in 
behavioral research. Emphasis will be placed on practical application of statistical theories and techniques 
applicable to social sciences, the use of statistical computer software, and the interpretation and 
production of statistical tables and charts. 

PSY 402 Clinical Interview and Behavioral Assessment (3) F, Sp, Su 

An introduction to approaches to counseling. The theoretical foundations and methodologies of the major 
clinical psychology theorists will be examined. 

PSY 403 Psychology of Learning (3) F, Sp, Su 

A study of the theories of learning, the course includes motivation of learning and experimental findings 
relative to animal and human learning and retention. Theories of Pavlov, Thorndike, Hull, Tolman, 
Guthrie, Skinner, and Hebb are introduced. 

PSY 405 Assessment and Evaluation (3) F, Sp, Su 

An introduction to the process of psychological testing. Topics will include basic test terminology, 
administration, interpretation, validity, reliability, ethics. 

PSY 406 Social Psychology (3) F, Sp, Su 

The study of the relationship of the individual to social systems. This course surveys the effects of 
physical, mental, and emotional growth and development on social interaction and social and cultural 
influences on behavior, attitude development, social conflict; group processes will be investigated. Major 
schools of social psychological perspective are, also, reviewed. 

PSY 407 Psychology of the African American (3) F, Sp, Su 

The primary focus of this course will be to examine the major psycho-cultural influences which have 
shaped the psychological lives and functioning of African Americans. Special attention will be given to 
examining the appropriateness of the Eurocentric psychological tradition in examining and describing the 
behavior and experience of African Americans. 



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PSY 408 PSY 410 Practicum I (3)/(6) F, Sp, Su 

This course provides institutional placement, composed of an on-site study of research practices, group 
treatment practices and psychotherapy for psychology majors. Authorization for placement must be 
obtained from the School/Department's practicum placement director. Registration and planning with the 
practicum director must be completed one semester prior to placement. 

PSY 409 PSY 411 Practicum II (6) F, Sp, Su 

The continuation of PSY 410 for psychology majors. Composed of on-site study, research practices, testing 
and analysis, and group treatment practices and psychotherapy. 

PSY 451 Minority Mental Health (3) Sp 

This course allows students to understand how a complex variety of social and psychological factors 
come together to shape mental health providers ability to work with those who are culturally different. 
Some of the topics include cultural competence, racism, culture and ethnocentricity, ethnic children, 
parenting and families, ethnic mental health issues, and biases in the mental health service delivery. 

PSY 452 Organizational Behavior (3) F, Su 

This course is concerned with the psychology of individuals and how their behavior is influenced by 
others in the organization. A major emphasis will be placed on examining the basics of individual 
motivation, attitudes, and decision- making, to determine how these human tendencies may lead to 
productive and ethical actions. 

PSY 453 Psychology and Law (3) F 

The overall objective of this course is to introduce students to the emerging field of psychology and law. 
The course examines the assumptions about human behavior as well as the various psychological 
processes that underlie and influence the operation and functioning of the law. Students are introduced to 
the major topics, issues, theories and empirical studies that comprise this particular field of social 
scientific inquiry. 

PSY 454 Theory & Practice of College Mentoring (3) F 

This course explores historical and contemporary approaches to mentoring in academic and business 
environments and examines central theoretical and empirical paradigms. A major emphasis is placed on 
the development of student leadership and mentoring skills. 

Public Administration 

PAD 301 Concepts and Issues of Public Administration (3) Sp, Su 

An introductory study of the theory and practice of governmental administration in differing 
environments, the role of administrators in public policy, issues facing administrators, and techniques of 
administration. 

PAD 302 Management of Urban Government (3) Sp, Su 

A study of the problems of local government units in the urban environment. Emphasis is placed on the 
organization and function of local agencies. 

PAD 303 Principles of Public Planning (3) F 

A study of the basic concepts of community, regional, county and city planning. Consideration is given to 
master plans, including purpose, content, and method of implementation. 

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PAD 304 Public Personnel Administration (3) F, Su 

An analysis of personnel problems with emphasis on supervision and management of public employees 
and public organizations in a period of change. 

PAD 305 Florida Law and Public Governance (3) F 

A study of Florida law governing the nature, regulation, and control of counties, charter cities, school 
districts and special districts. The creation, alteration, dissolution, legal actions by and against, powers 
and duties, the rights 
and liabilities of local governments are also studied. 

PAD 306 Administrative Behavior (3) Sp, Su 

A study of social, psychological and behavioral theories of organization. Consideration is given to the 
concepts of administrative leadership, the organization, and the individual with emphasis on 
governmental organizations. 

PAD 401Management of State Government (3) F 

Prerequisites: POL 301 and PAD 301. A study of the administration and constitutional problems of state 
management in the American federal system. Emphasis is placed on the State of Florida. 

Reading 

REA 101 Critical Thinking and Reading (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion ofDSR 099 or the required minimum score on the placement or diagnostic tests. 
This course develops and strengthens the critical thinking skills needed for reading college and 
professional materials, and will include bias and propaganda, fallacies, connotation/denotation, 
inductive/deductive reasoning, problem-solving, and inferential thinking. Students will read and discuss 
a wide range of materials taken from the various disciplines, and will complete projects which 
incorporate critical thinking abilities 

Religion 

REL 101 Intro to Religion (3) F, Sp, Su 

This is an intensive reading and writing course surveying the practices and associated customs of the 
major recognized religions of the world, such as Judaism, Christianity, Hinduism and Islam. 

REL 201 Introduction to Philosophy (3) F, Sp, Su 

This is an intensive reading and writing course surveying Western philosophy and its major 
philosophers. 

REL 202 Philosophy of Religion (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course is designed to give students an incisive approach to understand the basic philosophy of 
religions concepts. Special emphasis is placed on fundamental concepts and ideas of ethics, epistemology, 
metaphysics, and aesthetics. 

REL 204 History of the Hebrew People (3) Sp 

This course is designed to give students an appreciation for the history of the ancient Hebrew people and 
the development of the Judaic faith. Cultural intermingling of the Hebrews with surrounding nations and 

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its effect on the development of Hebrew social, political and religious perspectives of life will be 
emphasized. 

REL 206 Old Testament Survey (3) F 

A study of the history, literature, geography and theo-philosophical concepts presented in the Old 
Testament. The course deals with content, structure, dating, attitudes expressed at various stages, and a 
general overview of God's 
relationship to the Hebrew people. 

REL 207 New Testament Survey (3) Sp 

Introduction to the history, literature and theology of the New Testament. Attention will be given to the 
mission, ministry, and message of Jesus, the formation of the gospel tradition, the Jewish and Hellenistic 
background of the early church, the life and letters of Paul, other New Testament writings and the 
development of the canon. 

REL 303 Elementary New Testament Greek I (3) F 

Introduction to the elements of New Testament Greek, pronunciation and grammar, fundamentals of 
syntax, and acquisition of basic vocabulary. 

REL 308 Elementary New Testament Greek II (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: REL 303. This is a continuation of the fundamentals of Greek grammar. Attention is given to 
vocabulary, sentence structure. Rapid reading of Greek text. 

REL 310 The Psalms (3) Sp 

A study of the origin and liturgical use of selected Psalms with attention to their form and content. Their 
importance as a reflection of Israel's worship life and their poetic and religious value for our generation 
will be emphasized. 

REL 313 Life and Letters of Paul (3) F 

A study of the pre and post salvation life of Paul. Emphasis will be placed on his conversion, message, 
mission and ministry. His epistles will be surveyed briefly as they relate to various themes. 

REL 314 Survey of Baptist Doctrine (3) 

Analysis, interpretation, and critical appraisal of the beliefs commonly held among Baptists. 

REL 322 Christian History (3) Sp 

The growth and development of the early Christian church and its progress toward present times. The 
impact of secular movements on Christian thinking will be observed. The stability of the Christian church 
through changing times will be emphasized. 

REL 323 History of the Baptists (3) F 

The origin of the Baptist denomination on the European continent through its transmission to the 
Western hemisphere. Similarities and dissimilarities to other denominations will be pointed out. The 
course includes a basic understanding of its fundamental doctrines and beliefs. Recommended only for 
students in sympathy with sectarian emphasis. 



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REL 324 The Intertestamental Period (3) Sp 

A brief survey of the political conditions of this period. The impact of foreign culture on Jewish theology, 
the rise of religious parties, and the writing of the books of the Apocrypha. Special attention will be given 
to the change or changes in Jewish theological concepts carried over into the New Testament. 

REL 351 Pastoral Ministry (3) F 

For ministerial students only. A study of principles and methods for the preparation and delivery of 
sermons, with pastoral visiting and counseling, the planning of church worship services and other special 
duties for pastors. 

REL 353 Church Leadership (3) F 

Designed for both ministers and religiously mature lay students wishing to equip themselves for effective 
church leadership. Students will be assigned responsibilities in their churches, visit other churches for 
observation and carry out assigned work under the joint supervision of church leaders and Religion and 
Philosophy staff. 

REL 401 Christian Education (3) F 

A study of the foundations and principles of Christian Education, with a view toward understanding the 
methods by which the Christian faith can be inculcated in the total life of the home and the church. 

REL 402 8th and 7th Century Prophets (3) Sp 

An examination of the function and importance of prophecy and poetry in Old Testament times, followed 
by a detailed study of the Biblical books in these classifications. 

REL 405 Internship I (3) F, Sp, Su 

A program of Internship in a church or agency where ministerial students and mature lay persons may 
learn how to operate within these systems. 

REL 406 Internship II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Continuation of REL 405. 

REL 408 Evangelism (3) F, Sp, Su 

A survey of evangelistic endeavors, including Christ, the Master Evangelist, early evangelism in Acts, and 
strategies for evangelism in contemporary society. 

REL 409 Pastoral Counseling (3) F, Sp, Su 

A survey of counseling in the ministry, including practice and process (the Biblical approach), problems 
and dangers, reliable resources and referral agencies. 

REL 410 Homiletics (3) Sp 

This course emphasizes the structure, preparation, and delivery of sermons with a view toward 
improving the presentation of the gospel message through the medium of preaching. 

REL 420 Internship in Religious Education (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: REL 401. A program of research in Christian education practices in a local church. Open to 
students interested in Christian education. Students, supervisors and Religion and Philosophy faculty 
will work out a contract for this internship. Students' grades will be reported by supervisors prior to the 
end of the term. 

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REL 431 Biblical Ethics (3) F 

This course uses the case study method approach to the ethics of the Bible; it will help students 

understand the variety of ethical approaches present in Old and New Testament scriptures as a 
prerequisite to all other ethics courses. 

REL 432 Christian Ethics (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: REL 431. An introduction to Christian ethical theology. Includes a study of historical and 
contemporary ethicists and special issues raised by them. This course will explore subjects of personal 
choice, social concern and policies. 

REL 434 Life of Christ (3) Sp 

A comprehensive study of the life of Christ, including his teaching ministry, the miracles, parables and 
pithy sayings. Emphasis will be placed on his role as Messiah, Savior, and Lord. 

REL 435 African American Religion (3) F 

A comprehensive examination of the roots of the cultural and religious experience of African Americans 
in the American ethos. The course explores the African background, the slave experience, emancipation 
and the growth of cultural nationalism as these have contributed to American culture. 

REL 463 Black Theology (3) F 

An in-depth study of major black Christian thinkers in America, particularly the thought of James Cone 
and Martin Luther King, Jr. Also, attention will be given to other liberation theologies, e.g., third world, 
feminist, and womanist. 

REL 473 and 474 Systematic Theology I & II 

A systematic study of the principal theological doctrines of the Christian faith, doctrines of revelation, 
inspiration the triune nature of God, sin, election, redemption, and eschatology. 



REL 495 Senior Project (3) 

A culminating activity in religion researched, written, and presented for publication. 

Safety and Security 



Sp 



AHS 301 Principles of Homeland Security (3) F, Su 

This course will cover the factors involved with protecting our nation from terrorist threats/attacks. The 
student will explore mitigation, prevention, preparedness and other related national security concerns. 

AHS 302 Transportation Security (3) Sp, Su 

This course is a study of the federal, state and local organizations involved in border and coastal security, 
associated homeland security issues, the various policy and operational strategies used for border and 
coastal access and security, and contemporary border and coastal security concerns. Topics also include 
immigration and non-U. S. approaches to border and coastal security. 

AHS 303 Contemporary Security Management (3) Sp 

This course provides an overview of Contemporary Security Management. It serves as an indispensable 
working tool for Homeland Security student at all levels of experience and is designed to provide the 
hard facts on modern practices to run a security department efficiently and effectively. Vital topics 
covered include: leadership in management, employee relations, risk management and mitigation, 

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terrorism, information security, access control, investigations, substance abuse, workplace violence, and 
emergency management. 

AHS 411 Disaster Recovery (3) F, Su 

This course will detail the discipline of emergency management as it has developed over the past six 
decades, including the rapid evolution of the field since the turn of the century. It will bring the ideal 
combination of practical and experience to their presentation of disaster preparedness, mitigation, 
response, recovery and communications. 

AHS 412 Homeland Security Law and Policy (3) F 

This course will present a broad range of legal and policy issues that face our country as we grapple with 
the new reality of terrorism. The subject matter is very extensive, encompassing the entire range of 
activities in the American economy and government; to include the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency (FEMA), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and the Department of Defense (DOD). 

AHS 413 Terrorism & Homeland Security (3) Sp 

This course is a comprehensive overview of terrorism, public and private sector counterterrorism, and "all 

hazards" emergency management. It presents national, state, and local perspectives and up-to-date information, 

including the reorganization of the Department of Homeland Security, the renewed Patriot Act, and intelligence 

reform. 

AHS 414 Total Security Management (3) Sp, Su 

This course will cover the business practice of developing and implementing comprehensive risk 
management and security best practices for a firm's entire value chain. It will include an evaluation of 
suppliers, distribution channels, and internal policies and procedures in terms of preparedness for 
disruptive events such as terrorism, political upheaval, natural disasters, and accidents. 

AHS 415 Maritime Security (3) F, Su 

This course provides a thorough introduction to the topic of maritime security, as seen through the eyes 
of practitioners who have decades of on-the-ground experience-based knowledge in seaport security, 
vessel security, and commercial maritime transport. It will also detail the fundamentals of commercial 
shipping and how the business functions. 

SAF 101 Introduction to Occupational Health & Safety (3) F, SP 

Introduces the student to the field of safety and covers basic health, safety, and regulatory issues that 
apply to aviation and non-aviation business in the United States. Included is a comprehensive health and 
safety overview of legislative development and enactment of appropriate statues, regulations and laws. 
Additional topics include safety data statistics, safety culture and practices of the field of safety. 

SAF 245 Industrial Safety & Health Management (3) SP 

Binds together the traditional examination of time-tested concepts and techniques of safety and health 
management with a modern perspective on compliance with mandatory standard for workplace safety 
and health. Will add reason, explanation, and illustration of the hazard mechanisms that form the 
underlying basis for the volumes of detailed standards for workplace safety and health. 

SAF 241 Safety and Security of Aviation Ground Operations (3) F 

Discusses general aviation airport ground operations, particularly from the pilot and ramp worker's 
perspective. Focus will be on increasing awareness of airport operations and improving airport safety by 

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creating an enhanced awareness of rules, policies, procedures, and potential hazards that affect the safety 
and security of aircraft, crew, passengers, and others within the airport ground environment. 

Social Sciences 

SSC 101 Contemporary Society I (3) F, Sp, Su 

This is an intensive reading course. The course covers the basic concepts of culture, individual and group 
interaction, social stratification, socialization, primary groups and associations, and a study of the 
methods, techniques, and findings of sociology, psychology and anthropology as they are combined to 
reveal humans in their cultural environment. 

SSC 102 Contemporary Society II (3) F, Sp, Su 

This is an intensive reading course. This course covers the evolution of social political and economic 
institutions. Consideration is given to the scarcity of resources and the struggle for power. 

SSC 200 Cultural Anthropology (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course covers the comparative study of cultures, with emphasis on kinship, economic and political 
organizations and cultural change. 

SSC 300 Research Methods (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course provides an overview of various research methods used in sociology, political science, public 
administration, criminal justice, and other areas of social and behavioral science. Emphasis is placed on 
the logic of social inquiry, problems of research design and execution, and qualitative and quantitative 
analyses. Students will be guided through a research proposal that may be used in the development of 
their senior project. 

SSC 302 Introduction to Statistics (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of MAT 102 or a higher level math course. This course is designed to 
introduce students to the basic concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics, and to build a 
groundwork for better understanding social science data and statistics commonly used in social research. 
Emphasis will be placed on practical application of statistical theories and techniques to social science 
data, the use of statistical computer software, and the interpretation and production of statistical tables 
and charts. Measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, tests of significance, and correlation 
are covered. 

SSC 304/CUL 304 Cultures and Film (3) F, Sp 

This course will view independently and commercially made films. The analytical perspective is 
sociocultural. Focus will be placed on African, Latin American, Asian and Francophone film productions 
dealing, with issues of class, religion, and gender. 

SSC 320 Cooperative Education (6) F, Sp, Su 

Approval of the dean/department chair and the director of cooperative education is required. This course allows 
students to undertake employment related to the major in order to obtain practical experience and 
financial compensation. This course can be taken by any student with a major in Social Sciences who has 
completed the junior year of study. 



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SSC 321 Cooperative Education (6) F, Sp, Su 

Approval of tlie deanl department chair and the director of cooperative education is required. This course allows 
students to undertake employment related to the major in order to obtain practical experience and 
financial compensation. This course can be taken by any student with a major in Social Sciences who has 
completed the junior year of study. 

SSC 400 African American Women in American Society (3) Sp, Su 

An examination of historical arid contemporary roles of African American women in society. The course 
includes study of socio-political and psychological forces affecting African American women. 

SSC 403 Afro-Brazilian Society (3) 

This course is designed to provide students with a general understanding of twentieth century Afro- 
Brazilian society. By the conclusion of the course, students should be able to discuss, in both oral and 
written form, the major points, concepts, key theories, and issues in history, religion, sociology, politics 
and economics concerning Afro-Brazilian society and culture. 

SSC 404 Selected Topics in Social Science (3) F, Su 

An opportunity for interdisciplinary study in the social sciences as well as special topics of current 
relevance in the various social science disciplines. 

SSC 405 Contemporary Social Change (3) Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: SSC 300. An analysis of the dynamic basis of American social change, dealing with 
perspectives on American culture from a point of view that analyzes the American myth of western 
cultural supremacy. Cultural nationalism, with special emphasis on Black cultural life, will be the core 
consideration in the course. Reading will be extensive. Students will participate in and monitor projects 
and seminars that bear on the course of study. It is an advanced course of study for upper-level students 
committed to intensive reflections on nationalism and social change in American life. 

SSC 406 Advanced Statistics (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: PSY 312 or SSC 302. Further study of quantitative methods including correlation, chi-square, 
contingency and analysis of variance. This course is designed for students who have completed a basic 
statistic course and desire a greater understanding of social science data and statistics commonly used in 
behavioral research. Emphasis will be placed on practical application of statistical theories and techniques 
applicable to social sciences, the use of statistical computer software, and the interpretation and 
production of statistical tables and charts. 

SSC 419/421 Field Placement I (6) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: Senior Status. Advisor's approval. Learning through authorized, supervised work experience in 
the students' area of study. Student placement at appropriate, area-related work sites are conducted by. 

SSC 420/422 Field Placement II (6) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: SSC 421. A continuation of Field Placement I. Learning through authorized, supervised work 
experience in the student's area of study. Student placement must be authorized by the Department's 
field placement director, one semester before placement. 



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SSC 423 Senior Project (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisites: SSC 300 and Senior Status. A culminating course for seniors in the social sciences. Seniors are 
required to demonstrate an understanding of their field by developing and presenting an in-depth study 
in their major. The topic investigated must be submitted to and approved by the advisor and instructor. 

Social Work 

SOW 300 Introduction to Social Work (3) F, Sp 

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an historical and philosophical foundation for 
social work practice. Emphasis will be placed introducing the ethical concepts and values of the social 
work profession as well as the processes and interventions that take place in micro and macro level social 
work practice. 

SOW 301 Human Behavior and Dynamics (3) F, Sp 

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: SOW 300. This course examines the life course of human development within 
the context of social, cultural, psychological, and biological factors. Human behavior theories that focus 
on a life course perspective and integrate an ecosystems framework are studied. The influence of race, 
ethnicity, culture, gender, and socioeconomic variables on human development and behavior is 
examined. Person-in-environment transactions as a basis for understanding human behavior, and for 
social work practice are explored. 

SOW 302 Human Behavior and the Social Environment (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: SOW 301 or permission of instructor. This course prepares students for generalist social work 
practice through the acquisition of knowledge, theories, and concepts about human behavior in 
interaction with the social environment. The course integrates knowledge culled from empirically-based 
sociological, psychological, and other social science theories as well as natural science theories. 

SOW 303 Social Work Research Methods (3) Sp 

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSY 312/SSC 302, or permission of instructor. In this course, students are 
introduced to the logic and tools of the scientific method and to both qualitative and quantitative research 
designs. Students study the role that research plays in the design and assessment of social welfare policies 
and generalist social work practice. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of the knowledge and skills 
needed to critique, interpret, and apply research findings. The central role of research with populations- 
at-risk and efforts to promote social and economic justice is examined as well as sensitivity to cultural 
diversity in research designs and methods. Students will examine methods of evaluating social work 
practice at the micro, meso, and macro levels in varied settings. 

SOW 402 Social Work as a Profession (3) F, Su 

Survey of the field of social work including casework, group work, community organization, research, 
and administration. Case material is used to illustrate certain concepts and methods. 

SOW 405 Social Policy (3) F 

Prerequisite: SOW 300; Prerequisite or Co-requisite: POL 301. The course examines the policymaking 
process with attention to the structure of power and decision-making at the national, state and local levels 
of government. The course compares the structure and interests of the public and private sector. Models 
for policy formulation and analysis are critiqued as well as the functions and methods of policy practice. 
Students explore the background and development of social services in relation to economic, policy and 
social change. The history of social welfare services in diverse communities in the United States and other 

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countries is examined. The course provides an analysis of the delivery of social services with attention 
directed to the development of social welfare policies and programs. Field work is utilized to examine 
social welfare history in local communities. 

SOW 408 Social Work Writing Techniques (1) Sp 

Prerequisite: SOW 301; Co-requisite: SOW 409. This course focuses on the recording activities and relevant 
writing skills utilized in generalist social work practice. Students focus on applying knowledge culled 
from social work practice coursework and composing commonly used written venues employed by social 
workers. 

SOW 409 Social Work Practice I (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: SOW 301; Co-requisite: SOW 408. This course introduces students to entry-level generalist 
social work practice, with a focvis on micro and meso level interventions. A broad range of theories and 
the accompanying intervention strategies employed by social workers are examined. Students focus on 
developing generalist practice skills, with an emphasis on practice with individuals, groups, and families. 

SOW 410 Social Work Practice II (3) F 

Prerequisite: SOW 408 and SOW 409. This course introduces students to macro-level generalist social work 
practice. This course engages the student in an examination of a broad range of theories that promote an 
understanding of organizations such as the courts and social service agencies, and communities. The role 
of the social worker in these settings is studied. Emphasis is placed on assisting students in the 
development of generalist practice skills that foster effective service delivery systems, and prompt 
organizational change and community/neighborhood development, when needed. 

SOW 411 Social Work Field Practicum and Seminar I (6) F 

Prerequisites: SOW 302, SOW 303, SOW 409. During this course, students are provided with structured, 
supervised, field-based learning opportunities, practicing primarily with individuals, families, and 
groups. Students complete 200 hours of field work and attend a weekly field seminar. The focus of this 
course is micro-level generalist social work practice. The field setting provides practice opportunities with 
individuals, families and small groups, supervisory sessions with the agency-based field instructor, 
activities that involve collaboration with colleagues, and attendance at case staffings, staff meetings, and 
in-service activities. Students are required to adhere to a weekly work schedule, which may limit the 
amount of time off for intersession. This course is taken concurrently with SOW 410. Social Work Practice 
II. 

SOW 412 Social Work Field Practicum and Seminar II (6) Sp 

Prerequisite: SOW 405, SOW 409, SOW 411. During this course, students are provided with structured, 
supervised, field-based learning opportunities, with expanded opportunities to conduct macro-level 
practice with large groups, organizations and communities. Students complete 200 hours of field work 
and attend a weekly field seminar. The focus of this course is macro-level generalist social work practice. 
Students are expected to continue a moderate amount of practice with individuals, families and small 
groups, while engaging in practice with macro-level client systems including community groups and 
organizations. The weekly schedule continues to incorporate sessions with the agency-based field 
instructor and collaborative activities with colleagues with a focus on understanding the interdependence 
of organizational, community systems, and social policies. Students are required to adhere to a work 
schedule, which precludes time off for spring break. 



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SOW 413 Senior Project in Social Work (3) F 

Prerequisites: SOW 302, SOW 303, SOW 409. This is a course for seniors majoring in social work. Seniors 
are required to demonstrate an understanding of the contribution of research to the social work field by 
conducting a single subject study or a case study. The course enables students to integrate and apply 
learning from previous social work courses and apply scientific reasoning to address an aspect of social 
work practice. This course prepares students for effective social work practice and graduate studies. 

Sociology 

SOC 200 Introduction to Sociology (3) F, Sp, Su 

A study of man in social relationships. A study of the nature, concepts and principles of sociology, 
society, culture, socialization, groups, institutions and organizations; class systems; social change and 
social processes. 

SOC 303 Social Problems (3) F 

A study of the nature, extent, causes and consequences of major social problems which relate to social 
disorganization and pathology in American communities today. Analysis of attempts to alleviate such 
problems is included. 

SOC 304 Social Psychology (3) F, Sp, Su 

The study of the relationship of the individual to social systems. This course surveys the effects of 
physical, mental, and emotional growth and development on social interaction. Social and cultural 
influences on behavior, attitude 

development, social conflict, and group processes will be investigated. Major schools of social 
psychological perspective are also reviewed. 

SOC 305 Group Dynamics (3) F, Sp, Su 

This course focuses on the study of group interaction patterns and the role individuals play in group 

interaction. The course combines both theory and practice. Special attention is given to perception, 

communication, leadership 

and observation in a group setting. Other issues discussed include group goal setting, problem solving 

and decision-making. Students also talk about the ethical and professional issues of group therapy as well 

as review effective 

group counseling methods and techniques. Finally, issues of culture, gender, ethnicity, race and class are 

discussed in relation to group dynamics on Eviropean developments. 

SOC 306 Urban Social Movements (3) F, Su 

This course examines different forms of collective behavior. Special emphasis is given to social 
movements as a form of collective behavior and as a response to social problems, values, disorganization, 
and deviance. 

SOC 307 Community Organization (3) F, Sp, Su 

The evolution of community organizations, their structure, functions and practices. Emphasis is placed on 
the creation of community organizations and techniques of community organizations to meet social 
problems. 



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SOC 308 Urban Sociology (3) F, Sp, Su 

Study of the nature, causes and consequences of urbanization, the origin and development of the city, 
social and demographic characteristics of urban population, ecological processes, organization, functions 
and problems of urban communities, such as transportation, housing, homelessness. 

SOC 309 Sociology of Deviance (3) Sp, Su 

This course presents an examination of the definition and nature of deviance and its function in social 
settings, the various forms of deviance and the historical and contemporary definition of deviance. 

SOC 400 Independent Study (3) Sp, Su 

This course provides independent research of specific areas with direction and supervision of a sociology 
instructor. 

SOC 402 Racial and Cultural Groups (3) F, Su 

An analysis of intra-group and inter-group relations from the standpoint of contemporary sociology, 
anthropology, and social psychology. Major theoretical developments and research problems in the field 
of race relations are included. The nature and types of racial and cultural groups, causes and 
consequences of prejudice and discrimination, democratic values and scientific facts, and approaches to 
resolving inter-group problems are emphasized. 

SOC 403 Marriage and Family (3) Sp, Su 

A study of marriage and family as a social institution subject to the impact of biological, psychological, 
socio-cultural and religious-ethnic forces. Special emphasis is placed on the African American family in 
America. 

SOC 404 Seminar in Social Theory (3) Sp, Su 

A survey of the major social theories and their relationship to social research. Theories included are those 
of Marx, Durkheim, Park, Summer, Cooley, Mead, Veblen, Johnson, Frazier, Weber, Parsons and others. 

SOC 405 Survey Research (3) F, Su, Su 

Prerequisite: SSC 300. This course provides an opportunity for exploring and utilizing survey research 
techniques. Opinion polls, telephone surveys, mail questionnaires, panel studies and others are 
investigated. 

SOC 406 Contemporary Black America (3) F, Sp, Su 

This is an intensive reading course which examines historical, social, political, and economic factors 
affecting those of African descent living in America today. This course focuses on African Americans, 
Africans, South Americans, and individuals from the Caribbean islands in America. 

SOC 408 African American Women in American Society (3) F, Sp 

This is an intensive reading and writing course, which traces the historical, social, and political roles and 
perspectives of African American women. 

SOC 421 Field Placement I (6) F, Sp, Su 

Supervised on-site learning experiences. Student placement at appropriate sites are conducted by the field 
placement director. Regular seminars are held to discuss agency experiences and to provide feedback. 
Authorization for placement must be obtained from the field placement director one semester before 

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placement. Registration and planning with the field placement director must be completed one semester 
prior to placement. 

SOC 422 Field Placement II (6) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: SOC 421. A continuation of Field Placement I. Students learn through authorized, supervised 
work experience in sociology. Student placement in appropriate agencies or organizations is conducted 
by the School/Department's field placement director. 

SOC 431 Seminar in Drug Abuse (3) F, Su 

An introduction to the field of substance abuse and drug abuse counseling. Students study types of 
drugs, classification of drugs, the effects of drugs, drug abuse, and counseling modalities. Students 
identify local, state and national resource persons in the area of substance abuse. 

SOC 450 Sociology of Religion (3) Sp, Su 

Permission of chairperson required. Emphasis is given to the sociological foundation and development of 
major denominations, the Black church, and cults. The course is offered to majors in Social Science and 
Religion and Philosophy. 

Spanish 

SPA 201 Elementary Spanish I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 101. This course and its sequel, SPA 202, constitute the basic 
sequence in Spanish. Emphasis is on the development of competence in the language. NOT open to native 
or near-native speakers of Spanish. 

SPA 202 Elementary Spanish II (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of SPA 201. This course completes the sequence in the Spanish language 
core requirement. It prepares students for advanced course work in Spanish if desired. NOT open to 
native or near-native speakers of Spanish. 

SPA 301 Intermediate Spanish I (3) F, Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: SPA 202. This course is a continuation of Spanish 202 stressing improved fluency in spoken 
and written Spanish as well as reviewing and developing a greater understanding of the structure of the 
Spanish language. It includes an emphasis on Hispanic culture. NOT open to native speakers of Spanish 
(See FM Language Requirement). 

SPA 302 Intermediate Spanish II (3) Sp, Su 

Prerequisite: SPA 301. This course is a continuation of SPA 301 designed to improve fluency in spoken and 
written Spanish as well as to review and develop a greater understanding of the structure of the Spanish 
language. It includes an emphasis on Hispanic culture. NOT open to native speakers of Spanish (See FM 
Language Requirement). 

SPA 308 Advanced Spanish Composition (3) F 

Prerequisite: SPA 302 or permission of instructor. A further review of Spanish grammar and its application in 
written exercises, focusing on personal, journalistic, and academic topics. 



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SPA 311 Advanced Spanish Grammar (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: SPA 302 or 324. A further review of Spanish grammar and its application in written exercises 
focusing on personal, journalistic, and academic topics. 

SPA 312 Peninsular Culture and Civilization (3) F 

Prerequisite: SPA 302 or 312 or 324. A survey of the most important aspects of Peninsular (European) 
Spanish culture, including geography, history, folklore, and social customs of the people of Spain. 

SPA 313 Hispano-American Culture and Civilization (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: SPA 302 or 312 or 324. A survey of the most important aspects of Hispano-American culture, 
including geography, history, folklore, and social customs of the people of the former colonies of Spain. 

SPA 314 Survey of Peninsular Spanish Literature (3) F 

Prerequisite: SPA 302 or 324. A survey of representative examples of the most important literary works of 
Spain from El Cid through the 20th century. 

SPA 315 Survey of Hispano-American Literature (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: SPA 302 or 324. A survey of representative examples of the most important literary works of 
Hispano-America. 

SPA 309 Business Spanish (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: SPA 302 or 312. Concentrated practice in the vocabulary and style of commercial 
correspondence and other business documents as used in present day Spain and Hispano- America. This 
course is designed to improve skills in Spanish for native speakers and others desiring to improve 
professional communication in the world of commerce. 

SPA 319 Advanced Spanish Reading and Conversation (3) F 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 101. Concentrated practice in speaking skills at the advanced 
level. This course requires intensive reading, conversation and oral presentations in Spanish. Designed 
primarily for future teachers. Open ONLY to native speakers or students with near native fluency. 

SPA 323 Spanish for Native Speakers I (3) F 

Pre-requisite: Successful completion of ENG 101. This course is intended for native Spanish speakers having 
little or no formal course work in Spanish in high school. It covers spelling and grammar, focusing on 
problems faced by native speakers as well as readings and practice in writing compositions in Spanish 
(see FM Language Requirement). 

SPA 324 Spanish for Native Speakers II (3) Sp 

Pre-requisite: Successful completion of ENG 101 and SPA 323. This course is a continuation of SPA 312 and 
focuses on readings and practice in writing compositions in Spanish. It includes a variety of written 
materials found in magazines, newspapers and literature. Concentrated practice in developing writing 
skill (see FM Language Requirement). 

SPA 370 Spanish Study Abroad (3-6) Su 

This course offers a total immersion in Spanish language and culture through basic conversations, 
readings, and written work. It focuses on fundamental grammar and on the culture and folklore of the 
host country. School/Department approval required. 

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SPA 371 Intermediate Spanish Study Abroad (3-6) Su 

Prerequisite: SPA 202 or equivalent. This course offers a total immersion in Spanish language and culture 
through intermediate level conversations, readings, and writings. It focuses on intermediate level writing 
and grammar. Class discussions will cover contemporary Hispanic cultural issues as well as the history 
and folklore of the host country. School/Department approval required. 

SPA 401 The Hispanic Novel (3) F 

A survey of the Novel in Spain and Hispano-America. Periods and authors will be specified by the 
instructor. 

SPA 403 El Siglo de Oro (3) Sp 

Prerequisite: SPA 302 or 324. A survey of the major works of Golden Age of Spanish literature (c. 1520- 
1650) with particular emphasis on the works of Fray Luis de Leon, Lope de Vega, Luis de Gongora, 
Francisco de Quevedo and Pedro Calderon de la Barca. 

SPA 407 Cervantes (3) F 

Prerequisite: SPA 302 or 324. An examination of the major works of Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra with 
special attention to El Quijote and its influence on the development of the modern novel. 

Theatre 

THE 181 Theater Ensemble I (3) F 

Practical experience in theater production, including design, casting, directing, lighting, technical support 
and public performance, under faculty supervision. 

THE 182 Theater Ensemble II (3) Sp 

Continuation of THE 181. 



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University Board of Trustees 

Mr. Charles W. George, Chairman 

Mr. John W. Ruffin, Jr., (Vice Chairman) Chairman and CEO, J. D. Raffin Associates, Inc. 

Rev. Bartholomew Banks, Sr., President, Progressive M&E Baptist Convention of Florida, Inc.; Pastor, St. John 
Progressive Missionary Baptist Church 

Bishop Billy Baskin, Pastor, New Way Fellowship Praise & Worship Center 

Gershwin T. Blyden, M.D., Ph.D. 

Dr. Gwendolyn V. Boyd, Professor of Criminal Justice, Broioard College 

Rev. Dr. Kelly E. Brown, Jr., Pastor, Greater Mount Vernon Missionary Baptist Church 

Rev. Dr. Mack King Carter, Retired Pastor 

Mrs. Patricia Carter, President, Women's Auxiliary to the Florida General Baptist Convention, Inc. 

Mr. Julian Coakley, President, Florida Memorial University Student Government Association 

Mr. Kareem J. Coney, President, Florida Memorial University Alumni Association 

Bishop Victor T. Curry, Pastor, New Birth Baptist Church 

Rev. Marcus D. Davidson, (designee for National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc.), Sr. Pastor, New Mount 
Olive Baptist Church 

Ms. Lynn Fenster, Community Activist 

Mr. Marc T. Henderson, Metro-Dade Aviation Department, Office of Public Affairs 

JoLinda L. Herring, Esq., Bryant Miller Olive 

Rev. Dr. R.B. Holmes, Jr., Pastor, Bethel Missionary Baptist Church 

Mr. Horace C. Hord, Jr., Sr. Vice President, ICABA Media Holdings, LLC 

Mr. Frederick Jackson, CEO, Beecher Jackson 

Ms. Sharon Wamble-King, Vice President of Corporate Communications, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida 

Ms. Roberta R. Kressel, Sr. Vice President, Human Resources Team Leader, TD Bank 

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Rev. Wayne B. Lomax, Pastor, The Fountain of New Life 

Rev. Dr. Henry T. Rhim, Pastor, St. Joseph Missionary Baptist Church 

Rev. Dr. James B. Sampson, President, Florida General Baptist Convention; Pastor, First New Zion Missionary 
Baptist Church 

Mr. E. Ray Smith, Compliance Supervisor, UPS 

Mr. Michael B. Smith, President, Miami Skyline Consulting Company 

Rev. Stephen John Thurston, President, National Baptist Convention of America; Pastor, New Covenant 

Missionary Baptist Church 

Raul Valdes-Fauli, Esq., Managing Partner, Fowler Rodriguez Valdes-Fauli 

Rev. Dr. Richard L. Wilson (Secretary) 

Sharon Wilson, Esq., Shawn Wilson & Co. 

Mrs. Barbara Wright, President, Women's Auxiliary Progressive M&E Baptist Convention of Florida, Inc. 

Dr. Richard Yaklich, President, Florida Memorial University Faculty Senate 

HONORARY BOARD MEMBERS 

Mr. Garth C. Reeves, Sr„ Publisher Emeritus, The Miami Times 

Emeritus 

I. W. Williams, Esq., St. Petersburg, Florida 



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UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL 

President's Leadership Team 

Henry Lewis III, Pharm.D., President. B.S., Florida A&M University; Pharm.D., Mercer University Southern 
School of Pharmacy. 

Dr. Makola M. Abdullah, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. B.S., Howard University; M.S. and 
Pli.D., Northwestern University 

Dr. Harold R. Clarke, Jr., Vice President for Administration. B.A., M.A., California State University-Long 
Beach; M.A., South Carolina State University; M.A., Central Michigan University; Ph.D., Bam/ University 

Ms. Danneal Jones, Interim Vice President for Student Affairs. B.A., Fisk University-Nashville; M.A., Xavier 
University of Louisiana 

Dr. Mary A. O'Banner, Chief of Staff. B.S. Ed., M.S. Ed., Ed. S., Jackson State University; Ph.D., Southern 
Illinois University-Carbondale 

Mr. Tony Valentine, Vice President for Business and Fiscal Affairs. B.S., Norfolk State University; M.A., Regent 
Un iversity 

Dr. Adriene B. Wright, Vice President for Institutional Advancement. B.S., Florida A&M University; M.A., 
Frinity College of the Bible Fheological Seminar]/; Ph.D., Covenant Bible College and Fheological Seminary 

Faculty 

Idriss Abdoulaye, Associate Professor of Reading. Director of QEP. B.A., Baylor University, M.A, Ph.D., 
Unwersity of Arizona 

Keshia N. Abraham, Interim Chair of Humanities, Associate Professor of English. B.A., Spelman College, M.A., 
Ph.D., State University of New York (SUNY) 

Allee K. Allen, Director of Lou Raiols Center for the Performing Arts, Assistant Professor ofFheater, B.A., M.S., 
Florida State University 

Lynette Atteloney, Assistant Professor of Social Work. B.S., York College, MSW, Ph.D., Florida International 
Un iversity 

Tiffany Austin, Assistant Professor of English, B.A. Spelman College, M.F.A. Chicago State University., J.D., 
Northeastern University School of Law 

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Dawn Batson-Borel, Chairperson of Visual and Performing Arts and Professor of Music. B.S., Hofstra 
University; Mus., M.M., Ph.D., University of Miami 

Adela Beckerman, Professor of Social Work. MSW and B.S., SUNY at Stony Brook. Ph.D., SUNY at Albany 

Mildred E. Berry, Dean, School of Education and Professor of Education. B.S., Paine College; M.S., Ed.D., Wayne 
State University 

Jacques L. Bonenfant, Assistant Professor of Education. BA, Florida Atlantic University; Ed. Lp., MS., Nova 
Southeastern University ; Ph.D., Tlie Union Institute & Universihj 

Moussa Boucekkine, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, M.S., Ph.D., Carleton University 

Denise Callwood-Brathwaite, Associate Provost, Professor of Special Education. B.A., Hampton Institute; 
M.A., University of the Virgin Islands; Ph.D., Universihj of Miami 

Carlos Canas, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Director of Institutional Research. B.S.E.E., B.S.C.I.S., 
M.S., University of Florida, D.A. University of Miami 

H. K. Chaudhari, Professor of Biology. B.S., M.S., Universihj of Rajasthan; Ph.D., Nexo Mexico State University 

Wayne Christensen, Associate Professor of English. A. A., Miami-Dade Community College; B.A., MFA, Florida 
International University 

Carrol Christian, Associate Professor of Management Information Systems. B.P.S., M.S., Barry Universih/ Ed.D., 
University of Miami 

Zoila Y. Clark, Assistant Professor of Spanish, B.A., Feminine Universihj of the Sacred Heart, M.A., M.S., Nova 
Southeastern Universihj, M.A., Ph.D., Florida International University 

L. Trey Coleman, Associate Professor. B.S., M.S., Universihj of Nebraska; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Franklin Coronado, Instructor of Aviation & Safety, B.S., M.S., Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University 

Andrea L. Davis-Craig, Visiting Professor of Dance, B.S., Florida A&M University; M.A., Ph.D., Florida State 
Universihj 

Martha Dawson, Associate Professor of English. B.A., Florida International Universih/ M.A., Ph.D., Universihj 

of Miami 



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Telahun Desalegne, Associate Professor of Mathematics. B.S., Haile Selassie University; M.A., Ph.D., Bowling 
Green State University 

Nicolas C. Diogo, Assistant Professor of Computer Science, B.A., National University of Benin; M.S., Ph.D., 
Barry University 

Althea Duren, Assistant Professor of Reading, B.S., Nova Southeastern University; M.S., Ph.D., Florida 
International University 

Barbara Edwards, Associate Professor of Management, B.S., MBA, Bernard Baruch College; DBA, Nova 
Southeastern University 

Michael J. Elliott, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. B.A., University of Virginia; Ph.D., University of Texas at 
Austin 

Abbass Entessari, Dean, and Professor of Economics, School of Business. B.S., University of Tehran; M.A., 
University of Arizona; Ph.D., Hozoard University 

Renee L. Forbes, Associate Professor of Accounting, B.S., Tennessee State University; M.S., Clark Atlanta 
University; Ph.D; Argosy University 

Derek Ford, Visiting Instructor of Reading, B.A., M.S.; Florida Memorial University 

C. Anthony Fraser, Assistant Professor of History. B.A., University of Massachusetts-Amherst; M.A., State 
University of New York 

Edward J. Good, Instructor of Mathematics; B.S., Florida Memorial College; M.A., University of Miami 

Ana Guthrie, Assistant Professor/Reference Librarian, BA. University of Florida; M.S. Florida State University 

Nelson Hall, Assistant Professor of Music. B.S. Columbia Union College; M.Mus., D.M.A., University of Miami 

Augustus Henry, Visiting Instructor, B.S., DeVry University; M.S. Florida Memorial University 

Tameka Bradley Hobbs, Visiting Assistant Professor of History, B.A., F.A.M.U; M.A. Ph.D., Florida State 
University 

William A. Hobbs, Associate Professor of English, B.A., F.A.M.U.; M.A., Florida State University; Ph.D., 
Florida State University 



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David A. Hodge, Sr., Associate Professor of Religion. B.A., American Baptist College; M.A., Oral Roberts 
University; M.T.S., Emory University; D. Min., Columbia Theological Seminary 

Nathaniel Holmes, Jr., Assistant Professor of Religion and Philosophy, B.A., Florida Memorial University; M.S., 
Christian Tlieological Seminary; Ph.D., St. Tliomas University 

William E. Hopper Jr., Dean, School of Arts and Sciences, Director, Center for Urban Environmental Studies and 
Professor of Chemistry and Environmental Studies. B.S., Oklahoma State University; M.S., Florida International 
University; M.S., Ph.D., Universih/ of South Carolina 

Michael W. Hudson, Assistant Professor of Sociology. B.A., Columbia College M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 
at Chicago 

Ayivi Huisso, Associate Professor of Physics. B.S., University of Benin; M.S., Universih/ of Odessa; Ph.D., 
University of Montreal 

Olivia A. Jackson, Associate Professor of Political Science. B.S., Universih/ of Florida; M.P.A., The Ohio State 
University; Ph.D., University of Miami 

Randy James, Director of the Honors Program and Study Abroad, Associate Professor of English. B.A., Louisiana 
State University.; M.A., Eastern Kentuch/ University; Ph.D., Universih/ of Louisiana at Lafayette 

Annamaria Jerome-Raja, Assistant Professor, Special Education, B.S., Osmana University; M.A. Universih/ of 
Madras, Women's Christian College; Ph.D. Florida International Universih/ 

William Jong-Ebot, Associate Professor of Communication. B.A., Viterbo College; M.S., University of Minnesota- 
Twin Cities; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin -Madison 

Rita Koyame-Marsh, Associate Professor of Economics. B.S., U7iiversity of Kinshasa; M.S., Ph.D., University of 
Illinois at Urbana- Champaign 

Robert Labadie, Professor of Business Administration. B.A., MBA, Columbia University; Ph.D., Florida 
International University 

Thelma Cuttino Lawton, Associate Professor of Education. B.S., South Carolina State University; M.S., Indiana 
University; Ed.D., University of Central Florida 

Cheulho Lee, Associate Professor of Finance. B.S. Seoul National Universih/, MA, Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute and State Universih/ 

Dolores Lewis, Associate Professor of Reading. B.S., Tougaloo College; M.Ed., Ed.Sp., ]ackson State Universih/ 

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Tanner Ying Liu, Associate Professor of Health Education, B.S., China Medical College, M.S., Memphis State 
University, Ph.D., Texas Woman's University 

Milagros Coromoto Loreto, Assistant Professor of Computer Science & Mathematics, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Simon 
Bolivar University 

William D. Lucky, Jr., Assistant Professor of Marketing. B.S., Jackson State University; MBA, Ph.D. Florida 
International University 

Alessandra Manzon-Hernandez, Visiting Instructor of Biology, B.S., University of Miami; M.S. Walden 
University; M.S., James Cook University 

Elaine Marshall-Asfour, Associate Professor of Management Information Systems. B.A., B.S., Tufts University; 
M.S., Texas Tech University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Miami 

Malia L. McCarrick, Visiting Instructor of English, B.A., Central Michigan Universih/; M.A. Western Michigan 

Abigail C. Mobley-Bellinger, Associate Professor of Physical Education. B.S., Florida A&M University, M.Ed., 
Florida State Universih/, Ph.D., Florida State University 

Michael Moss, Visiting Instructor, B.S., University of Texas at Tyler; M.A., St. Thomas Universih/; Ph.D., Nova 
Southeastern University 

Russell O. Motley, Instructor of Communications. B.S., Universih/ of Miami; M.S., F.A.M.U. 

Melton Mustafa, Associate Professor. B.S., Florida A&M University; M.Mus., Universihj of Miami 

Earl R. Niles, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice. B.A., Brandeis University; M.A., Princeton Universihj; 
J.D., Universihj of Miami 

Christine Nucci, Assistant Professor of Education. B.A., Hunter College of CUNY; M.S., Brooklyn College of 
CUNY; Ph.D., University Center of CUNY 

Max C. E. Orezzoli, Visiting Assistant Professor, B.A., M.A., M.S., Ph.D., Florida International University; 

Lucy A. Osemota, Head of Reference/Archives Librarian and Assistant Professor. B.S., M.L.S., Universih/ of 
Tennessee 

Gloria Oswald, Director of Library and Technical Services Librarian and Associate Professor. B.S., M.L.S., 
Florida State University 

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Kimberly C. Pellegrino, Associate Professor of Management. BBA, Pennsylvania State University, MBA, West 
Virginia University; DBA, Louisiana Tech. University 

Robert J. Pellegrino, MBA Program Director and Associate Professor of Marketing. BBA, MBA, Western Illinois 
University; DBA, Louisiana Tech. University 

Debra Perkins, Associate Professor of Management. B.A., Indiana State University, MBA, The University of 
Nebraska at Omaha, DBA., University of Southern Indiana 

William D. Perry, Assistant Professor of French B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley 

Alvin Pondexter, Associate Professor of Art. B.S., Florida A&M University; M.A., M.F.A., University of 
Wisconsin at Madison 

Audley G. Reid, Associate Professor of Social Sciences. B.A., University of the West Indies; MTS, Emory 
University; Ph.D., The Union Institute 

Yvonne C. Ribeiro de Souza-Campbell, Assistant Professor of Reading Education, B.A., University of Pretoria; 
B.S., Vista University; M.S., Ph.D, University of Miami 

Tamar Franchette Riley, Associate Professor of Special Education. B.S., Liberty University; M.Ed., Ph.D., 
University of Florida 

Marilyn J. Ross, Professor of Higher Education. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Miami 

Ivan D. Rothstein, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, B.S., Kent State; M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Tech. 

Christopher Saffici, Associate Professor of Physical Education, B.A., Rutgers; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Houston 

Mary-Angie Salva-Ramirez, Assistant Professor of Communication. B.S., M.A., Universidad Del Sagrado 
Corazon, San Juan Puerto Rico; Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Debora Smith, Visiting Instructor of Reading, B.S., M.S., Florida Memorial University 

Channapatna Shalini, Collection Development and Electronic Resources Librarian, B.S., MLIS., Bangalore 
University; MIS., Florida State University 

Eshagh Shehniyilagh Assistant Professor of Psychology. B.S., University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma; M.S., 
Ph.D., Tennessee State University 

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Marilyn Lee Sherman, Assistant Professor of Biology. B.S. Southern Illinois University Carbondale; M.S., 
Western Illinois Universih/, Pli.D., Bowling Green State University 

Carolina Simon, Visiting Instructor of English, B.A. Loyola University; M.A., The University of Texas at Dallas 

VV. Ruth Sims, Reference/Instruction Librarian and Assistant Professor. B.S., Florida A&M University; M.L.S., 
Florida State University 

Thomas E. Snowden, Associate Professor of Biology. A.S., Montgomery County Community College; B.S., Paine 
College; Ph.D., Meharry Medical College 

Robert J. Steinhoff, Associate Professor of Computer Science. B.S., U.S. Coast Guard Academy; M.S., George 
Mason Universih/; Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University 

Edward G. Stephenson, Associate Professor of Psychology., B.A., Queens College; Ph.D., University of 
California 

Rose Mary Stiffin, Chairperson, Department of Health and Natural Sciences and Associate Professor of 
Chemistry. B.S., Mississippi Valley State Universih/; M.S., Mississippi State University; Ph.D., Universih/ of 
Tennessee - Memphis 

Robert L. Strain, Jr., Assistant Professor of Communication. B.A., M.A, Baylor Universih/; Ph.D., University of 
Kansas 

Ethel Alvena Symonette-Johnson, Instructor of Aviation & Safety, B.S., Florida Memorial University, M.S., 
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University 

Jauquina Sturdivant, Circulation Audio-Visual Media Librarian and Associate Professor. B.A., University of 
Florida; M.L.S., Atlanta University 

Jeffrey Dean Swain, Interim Director of Freshman Studies, Instructor of English, B.A., Morehouse College, 
M.S., Nova Southeastern University, J.D., University of Miami School of Laio, Ph.D., Union Institute & 
University 

Dimitri Tamalis, Associate Professor of Chemistry. B.S., McPherson College; Ph.D. Kansas State University 

Rose C. Thevenin, Associate Professor of History. B.A. & B.S., State University College ofNeiv York , College at 
Buffalo; M.A., University of Miami; Ph.D., Michigan State University 



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A Promise. A Future. 2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 

Sandra T. Thompson, Associate Vice President of Institutional Effectiveness, Professor of Sociology. B.A., 
Voorhees College; M.A., Fisk University; Ph.D., University of Florida 

Arnold James Tolbert (Captain), Director of Aviation a)id Assistant Professor, B.A., University of South 
Carolina; M.S., Central Missouri State University; Ph.D., Warren National University 

Wing Tong, Instructor of Computer Science. M.S., B.S., University of Miami; B.S., Tak Ming College, Hong Kong 

Priye S. Chris Torulagha, Chairperson, Department of Social Sciences and Associate Professor of Political 
Science. B.A., MA., Oklahoma State University; MHR, Ph.D, University of Oklahoma 

Eghosa Ugboma, Associate Professor of Management Information Systems. B.S., M.S., University of Paris VIII; 
DBA., University of Sarasota 

Josefino Z. Villanueva, Instructor of Mathematics, B.S., M.S., University of the Philippines, M.S., University of 
Miami 

Melvin White, Assistant Professor of Music and Director of Ambassador Chorale. B.A., Tougaloo College; 
M.Mus., Ohio State University 

Michelle L. Witherspoon, Assistant Professor Public Speaking, B.A. University of Missouri, M.A., Wichita 
State University; Ph.D., Barry University 

Boonserm Wongsaroj, Chairperson, Department of Computer Sciences and Mathematics and Professor of 
Engineering and Computer Science. B.S.I.E., University of Oklahoma; M.S.I.E, M.SXC.I.S.), University of Miami; 
Ph.D., Barry University 

Devon A. Wright, Visiting Instructor of History. B.A., M.A., Florida International University 

Richard Yaklich, Associate Professor of Music. B.A., University of Southern Colorado; M.Mus., Colorado State 
University; DMA, University of South Carolina 

Nicole K. Yarling, Assistant Professor of Music, B.A., Baruch College; M.A. Teachers' College 

Abbas Hassan Zadegan, Associate Professor of Mathematics. B.S., M.S.T., University of Florida; M.S., Florida 
International University, Ph.D., Florida Atlantic University 

Faculty Emeriti 

Helen Bergovoy, Professor Emeritus of Education 



328 



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Jesse Silverglate, Professor of Emeritus of Social Science 
Zdzislaw P. Wesolowski, Professor Emeritus of Airway Science 

Professional and Administrative Staff 

Jacklan Alexander, Director of Residential Life, Department of Residential Life. B.S., Florida A&M University; 

M.A., Pepperdine University; M.S., California State University - Los Angeles 

Annisa Ali, Senior Benefits Specialist 

Ronald Allen, Manager Inventory Control and Material Distribution 

Lelia AIlen-Efford, University Registrar, Office of the Registrar. A. A., Palm Beach Junior College; B.S., Florida 

Memorial College; M.B.A., University of Phoenix 

Doris Arnold, Counselor for Student Support Services 

Linda Arnold-Johnson, Residence Hall Director 

Wilkens Auguste, Graduate Recruiter 

Brenda Ausborn, Secretary, Athletics Department; B.S., Florida Memorial College 

Frances Ba, Reference and Archives, Library. B.S., Florida State University 

Regine Beauboeuf, Director of Annual Giving 

Sonianna Barrett-Anderson, Administrative Assistant to the Vice-President for Business and Fiscal Affairs 

Kenny Bellinger, Head Men's Basketball Coach. B.S., Florida Memorial College 

Yvonne Bendross, Director, Hospitality Services and Scheduling 

Sophretta Benjamin, Administrative Assistant, School of Business 

Mary Jenell Blake, Executive Assistant to Vice President of Institutional Advancement 

Katrenia Blue, Academic Service Assistant, School of Education 

Marie Boone, Administrative Assistant of Student Affairs 

Archie Bouie, II, Associate Vice President Auxiliary Services 

Alphonso Bre wester, Director Budgeting & Cash Management 

Chris Bromfield, Senior Netzoork Engineer, BS, Florida Memorial University 

Darlene Brown, College Reach Out Program Coordinator 

Daniel T. Buggs, Reference Librarian (Part-Time), College Library. B.A., Voorhees College; M.A., The Ohio State 

University; M.A.L.S., University of Michigan- Ann Arbor 

Alphonso Burnside, Director, Property & Risk Managemnt, B.S., Florida A&M University 

Lucinda Campbell, Living and Learning Advisor 

Patricia T. Carter, Director of Church Relations and Instructor, Freshmen Studies. B.S., Florida A&M University; 

M.Ed., University of Louisville 

Rachel Castrello, Secretary of Grants and Sponsored Research 

Glenn Carter, Purchasing Clerk 

John Rodney Carter, Assistant Director Student Activities 

April Chandler-Thomas, Advancement Services Specialist, Office of Development 

Nehemy Cher-¥rere,(Part-Time) Library Technician, College Library. B.S., Florida Memorial College; M.S., St. 

Thomas University 

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Caterina Clark, Copy Center Clerk 
Coby Chessman, Acquisitions Technical 

Eugenia Cole-Russell, Academic Advisor, Freshman Studies. B.S., M.S., Bam/ University 
Kareem J. Coney, Director, Black Male College Explorers Program. M.S., Nova, Southeastern University 
Shelia P. Cohen, Director of Alumni Affairs 

Osubi Craig-Bowser, Interim Director of Grants & Sponsored Research 
Regina Cumbie-McPhee, Secretary, Institutional Research 

Treon Cummings, Scholarship Coordinator, Office of Admissions. B.S. Florida Memorial College 
Robyn-Anne Davis, Student Account Manager 
Leighton Delvaille, Telecommunication Analyst I 

Samantha Dennis, Administrative Assistant of Health and Natural Sciences 
Leslie Derne, Library Assistant 
Rodney Dickey, Manager of Technical Support 
Shannon Dixon, Administrative Secretary for the Office of the Provost 

Priscilla Dobbs, Director of Educational Interns, School of Education. B.S., Florida Memorial College, M.S., Nova 
Southeastern University 

David Dobson, Driver, Facilities Management & Plant Operations 
Zefonic Dobynes, Academic Advisor, Freshman Studies. 
Cesar Dominguez, PC Technician, Information Management and Technology 
Rosa Dominguez, Library Technician, College Library. B.A., Union Institute & University 
Balfour Duncan, Cataloging/ Systems Technician, College Library, B.S., Florida Memorial College 
Michael Dysart, Library Assistant, College Library 

Lenora Edwards, Admissions Officer, Office of Admissions, B.S., Florida Memorial University 
Paulette Elliott-Whitsett, Academic Service Assistant for School of Business 
Patricia Fleeman, Secretary, Department of Humanities and Dept. of Visual & Performing Arts 
Sharonda L. Ford, Coordinator of Student Publications. B.S., MBA, American Intercontinental University 
Christopher Garcia, Assistant Coach, Men's Basketball 

Gladys Gonzalez, Director, Evening and Weekend Programs, Continuing Education, B.S., Biscayne College; 
M.Ed., University of Havana 
Carla Green, Secretary, Office of Church Relations 
Carolyn Green, Living and Learning Advisor 
Mary A. Green, Project Counselor, Student Support Services 
Ana Guthrie, Reference Librarian/ Assistant Professor 

Roberta Habersham, Secretary, Office of the Registrar. B.S., Florida Memorial College 
Kenrick Hadaway, Assistant Controller 

Walter J. Hale, Academic Advisor, Alumni Affairs. B.S., Florida Memorial College; M.A., Baruch 
College/CUNY 

Sheryl Hampton-Bain, Secretary, Career Development Center 

Irene Handsford, Administrative Assistant, Office of the Provost, B.S., Florida Memorial College 
Laurice Harris, Assistant Director, Office of Human Resource Management/ Payroll Management 
Tweedia Hillman, Testing Coordinator, Testing Center 

Hillary J. Hixon, Academic Advisor. B.S., Florida Memorial College, M.S., Nova Southeastern University 

330 



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Orlando Huertas, Director of Academic & Administrative Systems, BA, Universidad Metropolitana de Rio Pidras 

David Jaccarino, Director of Facilities and Plant Operations 

Athena Jackson, Director of Career Development Center, B.S., Fexas College, MP A., Florida International 

University 

Kuristan Jackson, Interim Assistant Bursar, Office of the Bursar, BS, Florida Memorial University 

Cynthia Jacobs, Staff Accountant 

Sheila Jenkins-Boone, Senior Project Counselor, Student Support Services, M.S., Barry University 

Bamikole Johnson, Cataloging Technician 

Ethel Johnson, Receptionist/ Switchboard Operator, Office of the President 

Lois Johnson, Administrative Assistant, Office of the Vice President for Administration, B.S., Florida Memorial 

College 

Linda G. Johnson, Living and Learning Advisor 

Winifred Jones, Associate Registrar, Registrar's Office, B.S. Florida Memorial College, MBA, University of 

Phoenix 

Delores Joseph, Manager, Accounts Payable, B.S., Florida Memorial College 

Willie D. Kemp, Assistant Controller 

Desmond C. King, Library Audio-Visual Media Coordinator. A.A., Miami-Dade Community College 

Carla King-Crockett, Academic Advisor, Freshman Studies Department. B.S., Jackson State University 

Natosha King, Secretary, Brozoard Campus 

Natalie Knight, Secretary, Alumni Affairs 

Cheryl Lacey, Assista)it Director of Admissions, Admissions Department. A. A., Miami-Dade Community 

College; B.S., Florida Memorial College 

Mirlande Laguerre, Residence Hall Counselor, Residential Life 

Trevor Lewis, Admissions Officer, Office of Admissions 

Sandra Long, Student Accounts Coordinator, Budgeting & Cash Management 

Curtis Major, Fleet Manager/ Driver, Facilities Management & Plant Operations 

C. Vernon Martin, Jr., Director of Student Activities B.S., Lincoln University 

Peggy D. Martin, Director of Admissions. B.S., Tuskegee Institute; M.S., Southern Illinois University - 

Edwardsville 

Terisia Matthew, Secretary, Budgeting and Cash Management 

Montrice McClain, Data Entry Clerk for Admissions 

Shamona McFadden, Counselor 

Toshiba Mitchell, Director of Distance Learning & Instructional Technology, BA, MS and EDS, St. Thomas 

University 

Valda Mckinney, Living and Learning Advisor 

Regina C. McPhee, Secretary for Institutional Research! Aviation! Computer Science and Mathematics 

Willys G. Michel, Living and Learning Advisor 

Archie Mobley, Bursar, Budgeting and Cash Management , B.S., Tlorida A&M University 

Carolyn Mosley, Administrative Assistant for University Library 

Ester Nelson, Living and Learning Advisor 

Gus Nero, Residence Hall Counselor, Residential Life, MSW, University of Pittsburgh 

331 



Florida Memorial University 

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Nelda Nunez-Cortez, Administrative Assistant, Counseling Center 

Phillip O'Hara, Financial Aid Officer 

Shirley Paremore, Director, Broward Off-Site Campus, Continuing Education, B.S., Barn/ University; MBA, 

Embnj-Riddle Aeronautical University 

Wynifreth Pardo, Staff Accountant, Controller's Office 

Wendell Paris, Campus Minister 

Monique Parris, Living and Learning Advisor 

Jubriell Paulk, Secretary, Freshman Studies 

Ann Payne-Nimmons, Secretary for Lou Raids Center of Performing Arts 

Gloria Penn, Financial Aid Officer, Financial Aid Department, B.S., Mississippi Valley State University 

Russell Penn, Living and Learning Advisor 

Cheryl Phillip, Manager of Procurement and Contract Services, Controller's Office 

Norwyn Phillips, Director of Technical Services, BA, New Jersey State University, MS, Nova Southeastern 

University 

Joyce Powell, Seer etani for Residential Instructor 

Richard Qualis, Admissions Officer 

Homer Randle, III, Aviation Recruiter/Instructor 

Joan Redd, Administrative Assistant, Office of Vice President Institutional Advancement, BA., University of 

Miami 

Lorenzo Reed, Residence Hall Director, Residential Life 

Ayana Reid, System Administrator 1 

Sadie Reyes, Library Technician, College Library. B.S., Florida Memorial College 

April Richards, Secretary for the Office of the President 

Roosevelt Richardson, Women's Track Coach, Athletics Department 

Veronica Ricketts, LPN/ Secretan), Health Clinic 

Zachary R. Rinkins, Communications Coordinator 

Magalie Ripert, Mail Center Manager 

Robert Robaina, Part-time Recruiter, Admissions 

Gwendolyn Robinson, Director of Pre-Student Teaching, School of Education. B.S., Bethune-Cookman College; 

M.A., Ed.D., University of Northern Colorado 

Faye Rodney, Financial Aid Officer, B.S., Barry University of the Bahamas 

Sidra Sargent, Administrative Assistant for Arts & Sciences/ Social Science 

Pomona Seay, Cataloging Technician, College Library, B.S. Florida Memorial University 

Channapatna Shalini, Technology Resource/Librarian & Acquisitions 

Peter L. Shaw, Auxiliary Services Coordinator I Cafe Supervisor Auxiliary Services 

Natalie Simpson, Web Master I Content Coordinator 

Bernice Smith, Periodicals Librarian (Part-Time), College Library. B.A., M.S.L.S., University of Pittsburgh 

David Smith, P.C. Technician 

Robert Smith, Athletic Director, and Baseball Coach. Assistant Professor of Physical Education . B.S., Lincoln 

University, M.S., Indiana University 

Rodney Sobelson, Controller 

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OIlie W. Speed, Living & Learning Advisor 

James Sterlin, Scholarship Coordinator, Office of Admissions 

Latasha Strawder, Assistant Cheerleader Coach, Athletic Department 

Kozman D. Stroman, Assistant Director of Financial Aid, Financial Aid Department, B.S., Florida Memorial 

College 

Kimberly Tarver, Secretary, Office of the Associate Provost, and Institutional Effectiveness 

Sheryl Thomas, Accounting Assistant, Controller's Office, B.S., Florida Memorial College 

Belina Thompson, Administrative Professional for Student Support Services 

Rachel Turner, Assistant, President's Office; B.S., South Carolina State University 

Trevor Walker, Manager, Duplication Center 

Roscoe Warren, Director of Enrollment Management B.S. Georgetown University 

Keith Webb, Library Technical Services Technician, College Library 

Cheryl Wilcher, Periodical Technician, College Library, B.S., Florida Memorial University 

Angela Williams, Secretary, School of Education, B.S., Florida Memorial University 

Argerine Williams, Director, Student Support Services, M.S.W., Barry University 

Edward Williams, Skills Lab Coordinator, Freshman Studies, B.S., Florida Memorial College 

Kim Williams, Secretary for Admissions 

Valerie Williams, Director, Office of Human Resource Management, B.S. Barry University, M.S. University of 

Phoenix 



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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



University index 



A-C 



Academic Affairs, 39 

Academic Appeal, 43 

Academic Calendar, 4 

Academic Dismissal, 43 

Academic Honor Code, 57 

Academic Honors, 53 

Academic Progress, 43 

Academic Probation, 43 

Academic Regulations, 40 

Academic Standing, 43 

Academic Suspension, 43 

Academic Warning, 43 

Access to Student Records, 16 

Accounting, Major in, 167 

Accreditation, 11 

Add, Drop and Withdrawal, 55 

Admissions, 18 

Advance Placement (AP), 21 

Aeronautical Science, Major in, 74 

African American Studies, Minor in, 115 

Airway Science, Major in, 79 

Attendance Policy, 50 

Aviation Safety, Minor, 76 

Anti-Hazing Policy, 30 

Articulation Agreement, 45 

Auditing a Course, 56 

Biology, Major in, 98 

Biology, Minor in, 119 

Biology w/Concentration in Radiobiology, Major in, 107 

Biology Education, 181 

Biology/Nursing, Major in, 100 

Business Administration, Major in, 169 



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Business Administration, Minor in, 176 

Campus Directory, 16 

Campus Facilities and Resources, 13 

Campus Map, vi 

Career Development, 38 

Center for Academic Advisement and Retention, 68 

Center for Urban Environmental Studies, 62 

Change of Grades, 52 

Chemistry, Major in, B. A., 109, B. S., 110 

Chemistry, Minor in, 120 

Chemistry w/ Concentration in Radiochemistry, Major in, 112 

Classification of Students, 57 

College Level Examination Program (CLEP) Policies, 47 

Communications, Major in, 122 

Communications, Minor in, 125 

Computer Information Systems, Major in, 83 

Computer Information Systems, Minor in, 86 

Computer Science, Major in, 87 

Computer Science, Minor in, 90 

Concurrent Enrollment, 57 

Core Curriculum, 70 

Course Cancellation, 55 

Course Descriptions, 215 

Credit by Examination, 42 

Credit for Life Experience, 46 

Criminal Justice, Major in, 135 

Criminal Justice, Minor in, 141 

D-G 

Deferred Payment Plan, 37 

Degree Programs, 40 

Developmental Courses, 67 

Dual-Hospitality Mgmt Program, 164 

Dual Majors, 50 

Ecology, Minor in, 120 

Elementary Education/ESOL(K-6), Major in, 185 

English, Major in, 126 

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Florida Memorial University 

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English, Minor in, 129 

Environmental Studies, Major in, 114 

Environmental Science, Minor in, 120 

Exam Permit, 36 

Exceptional Student Education/ESOL , Major in, 189 

Faculty, 321 

Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA), 59 

Finance, Major in, 172 

Finance, Minor in, 177 

Financial Aid, 22 

Financial Information, 32 

Foreign Language, Minor in, 129 

Freshman and New/Transfer Student Orientation, 29 

Freshman Studies, 66 

Grade Appeal, 52 

Grade Reports, 52 

Grading System and Quality Points, 51 

Graduation Requirements, 49 

Grants and Sponsored Research, 63 

Grievance Procedure for Students, 30 

H-L 

Health Ed, Minor, 220 

History, Minor, 151 

Homeland Security, Minor, 77 

Honor Societies, 53 

Honors Program, 71 

Human Resource Management, Minor in, 177 

Institutional Research, 64 

Institutional Statement of Purpose, 10 

Interdisciplinary Studies, Major in, 163 

M-P 

Mgmt Info Systems, Major in, 91 
Mgmt Info Systems, Minor in, 94 
Marketing, Major in, 174 

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Marketing, Minor, 177 

Mathematics, Major in, 95 

Mathematics, Minor in, 97 

Memberships and Affiliations, 12 

Middle Grades English/ESOL Education(5-9), Major in, 193 

Middle Grades Mathematics Education(5-9),Major in, 197 

Middle Grades Science (5-9),Major in, 201 

Music Education K-12, Major in, 204 

Music, Major In, 159 

Music w/Elective Studies, Major in, 162 

Music, Minor in, 161 

Music, Church Music, Major in, 156 

Music, Jazz Studies, Major in, 158 

Physical Education (K-12), Major in, 208 

Physics, Major in, 115 

Physics, Minor in, 120 

Physics-Engineering Program, Major in, 118 

Poli Sci/Public Admin, Major in, 139 

Poli Sci/Public Admin, Minor in, 141 

Pre-College/Development Studies Program, 69 

Pre-Hospitality Management, Major in, 176 

President's Leadership Team, 321 

Professional & Administrative Staff, 329 

Psychology, Major in, 142 

Psychology, Minor in, 152 



R-S 



Re-admission, 22 

Refunds or Adjustments, 37 

Refunds Schedule, 37 

Registration, 55 

Religion and Philosophy, Major in, 130 

Second Baccalaureate Degree, 50 

Secondary English Education (6-12), Major in, 212 

Secondary Mathematics Education(6-12), Major in, 216 

Service Charges, 33 

Services Charges, Description of, 34 

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2011-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 



Social Work, Major in, 145 
Social Welfare, Minor in, 152 
Sociology, Major in, 149 
Sociology, Minor, 153 
Special Stipulations, 36 
Statement of Disclosure, iv 
Student Affairs, 18 
Student Records, 58 

T-Z 

Testing Center Services, 69 

Transfer Credits from Int'l Institutions, 20, 49 

Transfer of Credits Policy, 44 

Transient Permit, 57 

Trustees, Board of, 319 

Tuition and Fees, 32 

Tuition and Fees, Payment of, 35 

University Library and Services, 63 

University Personnel, 321 

Veteran Affairs, 62 

Visual Arts, Minor in, 162 



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Social 

Social Welfare, N 

Socio 

Sociolo^, 

Special Stip 

State rru 

Student 

Student 

T-Z 

Testing Cei 1 

Transfer i ns, 20, 49 

Transfer 

Transient. Pe 

Trustees, Boa 

Tuition and i 

Tuition and ! 

University 1 

University i 

Veteran Affa 

Visual Arts,